The Grid – Evolver

Fans of mid-1990s dance music cannot fail to be aware of The Grid‘s third album Evolver, and the huge hit singles that came from it. Famously named in homage to The Beatles‘ Revolver, this is the album where Richard Norris and Soft Cell‘s Dave Ball finally made their impact on the world of dance music.

It opens with Wake Up,

The second track was also the third single, the adorable Rollercoaster,

The huge hit from this album, and probably honestly the only reason most people remember anything about The Grid, was its second single, the joyful banjo-meets-trance track Swamp Thing,

There’s little else here with quite that same level of energy, but that isn’t necessarily a problem. Throb

The big surprise, in many ways, with The Grid is just how different each of their albums was – 1990 debut Electric Head is deliciously electronic pop, with some underground leanings, and 1992’s 456 is a transitory album, with only its final single Crystal Clear really sounding anything like Evolver. Then after a long break, 2008’s Doppelgänger is pure house.

With that in mind, it’s a little surprising just how unchallenging some of this album’s central tracks such as Rise

Some tracks do stand out though, for all of that, and Shapes of Sleep

Higher Peaks has a slightly different mood, sounding a bit more like a self-help tape than anything else we’ve heard up to now. But this is a long album, and it’s easy to get lost in between the hits.

Finally, we get the brilliant Texas Cowboys, released twice, as both the first and last single from this album, hitting number 21 and 17 respectively. The huge sirens, whiplash samples, and vocals are just mesmerising. This is easily the best track on here – it may not have had the novelty appeal of the banjos on Swamp Thing, but it’s a much better piece of music.

Spin Cycle follows, another huge dance piece, this time built around a rippling electric piano arpeggio. Good, but nothing particularly world-changing. In fact, it’s closing track Golden Dawn that offers the first real surprise here – it’s slower, and a bit less manic, except for a reasonably insane operatic lead vocal that eventually turns up halfway through. Leave the CD playing a little longer after the track finishes, and you’ll be treated to an entirely bonkers answerphone message to close the album out. Odd, but strangely enjoyable.

So Evolver is a good album – perhaps not a great album, and definitely one very much of its time – but definitely a good one. It’s undoubtedly The Grid‘s best known work, but is it even their best? We can debate that another time. Either way, if nothing else, if you’re looking for an hour of solid mid-90s dance and trance, this is a pretty good way to fulfill that desire.

You can still find the original release of Evolver at major retailers.

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Ivor Novello Awards – The 1970s

Having discovered popular music in the mid-1960s, the Ivor Novello Awards seem to have taken a bit of a step back in the 1970s, by becoming obsessed with musicals and jazz, and ignoring the stuff that people were actually listening to.

Ivor Novello Awards 1970

Fifteen ceremonies in, the Ivor Novello Awards entered the 1970s on 10th May 1970, at Talk of the Town. The ceremony was broadcast on TVR.

  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1969 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Get Back, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da, performed by The Beatleswritten by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The British Songwriter of the Year: Tony Macaulay
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Noel Coward
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Where Do You Go To My Lovely, written by Peter Sarstedt
  • Best Score from a Film or Musical Play: Madwoman of Caillot, written by Michael Lewis
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Arranger / Composer: Ernest Tomlinson
  • British International Hit of the Year: Love Is All, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • International Artist of the Year: Tom Jones
  • Special Award for Originality: Space Oddity, written by David Bowie
  • Special Award for The Most Contemporary Song: Melting Pot, performed by Blue Mink, written by Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway

Ivor Novello Awards 1971

The 1971 ceremony was the sixteenth.

  • British Songwriters of the Year: Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Cliff Richard
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1970 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: In the Summertime, performed by Mungo Jerry, written by Ray Dorset
  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Yellow River, performed by Christie, written by Jeff Christie
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Something, performed by The Beatles, written by George Harrison
  • Best Theme from Any Film, Television Programme or Theatrical Production: Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mr Hitler, written by Jimmy Perry and Derek Taverner
  • The Best Ballad or Romantic Song, Musically and Lyrically: Home Lovin’ Man, performed by Andy Williams, written by Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway and Tony Macaulay
  • The Best Pop Song: Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes), performed by Edison Lighthouse, written by Tony Macaulay and Barry Mason
  • The Best Novel or Unusual Song, Musically and Lyrically: Grandad, performed by Clive Dunn, written by Herbie Flowers and Ken Pickett
  • The International Hit of the Year by British Writers: In the Summertime
  • Light Music Award: March from the Colour Suite, written by Gordon Langford

Ivor Novello Awards 1972

The 1972 ceremony was introduced by Robin Boyle, and broadcast on BBC Radio 2 on 28th June 1972.

  • British Songwriters of the Year: Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Jimmy Kennedy
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1971 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: My Sweet Lord, written by George Harrison
  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: My Sweet Lord
  • Entertainment Music: Ron Goodwin
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Don’t Let It Die, written by Hurricane Smith
  • The Best Song and/or Theme Score from any Film, Television Programme or Theatrical Production: I Don’t Know How To Love Him, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • The Best Ballad or Romantic Song, Musically and Lyrically: No Matter How I Try, written by Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • The Best Pop Song, Musically and Lyrically: A Simple Game, performed by The Moody Blues, written by Mike Pinder
  • The Best Novel or Unusual Song, Musically and Lyrically: Ernie, written by Benny Hill
  • The International Hit of the Year by British Writers: Jesus Christ Superstar, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Ivor Novello Awards 1973

On 3rd May 1973, at the Connaught Rooms in London, the Music Publishers Association Lunch hosted the eighteenth Ivor Novello Awards.

  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Vivian Ellis
  • British Songwriter of the Year: Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Beg Steal or Borrow, written by Tony Cole, Graeme Hall and Steve Wolfe
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1972 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Mouldy Old Dough, performed by Lieutenant Pigeon, written by Nigel Fletcher and Rob Woodward
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Without You, performed by Badfinger, written by Tom Evans and Peter Ham
  • The Best Song and/or Theme or Score from any Film or Theatrical Production: Diamonds Are Forever, written by John Barry and Don Black
  • The Best Song and/or Theme from any Radio or Television Programme: Colditz, written by Robert Farnon
  • The Best Ballad or Romantic Song: The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, performed by Roberta Flack, written by Ewan MacColl
  • The Best Pop Song: Oh Babe What Could I Say, written by Hurricane Smith
  • The Best Novel or Unusual Song: The People Tree, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • The International Hit of the Year by British Writers: Without You

Ivor Novello Awards 1974

BBC Radio 2 broadcast the 1974 ceremony on 17th May, introduced by Alan Black.

  • Songwriters of the Year: Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Tolchard Evans
  • International Hit of the Year by British Writers: Power to All Our Friends, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Guy Fletcher and Doug Flett
  • Most Performed British Song: Get Down, written by Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • Best Selling British Record: I Love You Love Me Love, written by Mike Leander
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Daniel, written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • The Best Score from any Film or Theatrical Production: Jesus Christ Superstar, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • The Best Song or Theme from any Radio or TV Programme: Galloping Home, written by Denis King
  • The Best Ballad or Romantic Song: Won’t Somebody Dance with Me, written by Lynsey De Paul
  • The Best ‘Pop’ Song: You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me, performed by New Seekers, written by Tony Macaulay and Geoff Stephens
  • The Best Novel or Unusual Song: Nice One Cyril, performed by Cockerel Chorus, written by Helen Clarke and Harold Spiro
  • The Best Beat Song: Rubber Bullets, performed by 10cc, written by: Lol Crème, Kevin Godley and Graham Gouldman

Ivor Novello Awards 1975

The 1975 ceremony took place at the Dorchester Hotel, London and was broadcast on BBC Radio 2 on 22nd May 1975. The awards were introduced by Len Jackson.

  • Songwriters of the Year: Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Vera Lynn
  • Most Performed British Song: Wombling Song, performed by The Wombles, written by Mike Batt
  • Best Selling British Record: Tiger Feet, performed by Mud, written by Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • The Best Light Orchestral Work: Four Dances from Aladdin, written by Ernest Tomlinson
  • The Best New Musical: Treasure Island, written by Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • The Best Song: Streets of London, written by Ralph McTell
  • The Best Pop Song: Kung Fu Fighting, written by Carl Douglas
  • The Best Theme from a Film or a Stage, Radio or Television Production: No Honestly!, written by Lynsey De Paul
  • The British International Hit of the Year: The Night Chicago Died, written by Peter Callander and Mitch Murray

PRS Ivor Novello Awards 1976

The 1976 ceremony too place on 11th May at the Dorchester Hotel, London.

  • Songwriters of the Year: Wayne Bickerton and Tony Waddington
  • Music Publisher of the Year: Geoffrey Heath
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Dick James
  • Most Performed British Work: I’m Not In Love, performed by 10cc, written by Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • Best Selling British Record: Bohemian Rhapsody, performed by Queen, written by Freddie Mercury
  • Best Middle of the Road Song: Harry, written by Catherine Howe
  • Best Pop Song: I’m Not In Love
  • Best Theme from TV or Radio: The Edwardians (Upstairs, Downstairs Theme), written by Alexander Faris
  • Best Film Score: Murder on the Orient Express, written by Richard Rodney Bennett
  • Best British Musical: Great Expectations, written by Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • International Hit of the Year: I’m Not In Love
  • Best Instrumental Work: Introduction and Air to a Stained Glass Window, written by John Gregory
  • Best British Work for Children: Captain Noah and His Floating Zoo, written by Michael Flanders and Joseph Horovitz

Ivor Novello Awards 1977

The 1977 ceremony took place at Grosvenor House, in London.

  • Best Pop Song: Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin. Also nominated: Heart On My Sleeve, performed by Gallagher and Lyle, written by Benny Gallagher and Graham Lyle; We Do It, performed by R&J Stone, written by Russell Stone
  • Best Middle of the Road Song: Music, written by John Miles. Also nominated: Don’t Cry for Me Argentina, by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber; Miss You Nights, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Dave Townshend
  • Best Theme from Radio or Television Production: Sam, composed by John McCab. Also nominated: Bouquet of Barbed Wire, by Dennis Farnon; The Sweeney, by Harry South
  • International Hit of the Year: Save Your Kisses for Me, performed by Brotherhood of Man, written by Tony Hiller, Martin Lee and Lee Sheriden; Don’t Go Breaking My Heart; You Should Be Dancing, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • Most Performed Work and Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Save Your Kisses For Me. Also nominated: Don’t Go Breaking My Heart
  • Best Instrumental Work: Rain Forest, written by Biddu; Theme from a Non-Existent TV Series, by Elton John and Bernie Taupin; The Sweeney, by Harry South
  • Special Award for their Contribution to British Music: Led Zeppelin (John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant)
  • Special Award for the James Bond Theme: Monty Norman
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Adrian Boult
  • Songwriter of the Year: Biddu

Ivor Novello Awards 1978

The 1978 ceremony took place at Grosvenor House, in London.

  • The Best Pop Song: Mull of Kintyre, performed by Wings, written by Paul McCartney and Denny Laine. Also nominated: How Deep Is Your Love, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice GibbBoogie Nights, performed by Heatwave, written by Rod TempertonDon’t Cry for Me Argentina, by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Don’t Cry for Me Argentina. Also nominated: Sam, performed by Olivia Newton-John, written by John Farrar, Hank Marvin and Don BlackHow Deep Is Your Love
  • The Best Theme from a Radio or Television Production: Poldark, composed by Kenyon Emrys-Robert. Also nominated: Wings, by Alexander FarisLove for Lydia, by Harry Rabinowitz
  • The Best Film Music or Song: How Deep Is Your Love. Also nominated: The Duellists, by Howard Blake; The Scarlet Buccaneer, by John Addison
  • The Outstanding Lyric of the Year: Matchstalk Men and Matchstalk Cats and Dogs, performed by Brian and Michael, written, written by Michael Coleman and Brian Burke. Also nominated: Don’t Cry for Me ArgentinaHeaven on the 7th Floor, performed by Paul Nicholas, written by Dominique Bugatti and Frank Musker
  • The Best Instrumental or Popular Orchestral Work: Cavatina, composed by Stanley Myers. Also nominated: The Snow Goose, by Ed Welch and Spike MilliganLove Transformation, by Roger Greenaway
  • The International Hit of the Year: Don’t Cry for Me Argentina. Also nominated: How Deep Is Your LoveAngelo, performed by Brotherhood of Man, written by Tony Hiller, Lee Sheridan and Martin Lee
  • The Most Performed Work: Don’t Cry for Me Argentina. Also nominated: Don’t Give Up On Us, by Tony Macaulay; I Don’t Want to Put a Hold On You, by Berni Flint and Michael Flint
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Mull of Kintyre. Also nominated: Don’t Cry for Me Argentina; Don’t Give Up On Us, performed by David Soul, written by Tony Macaulay
  • The Best British Musical: Privates on Parade, by: Denis King and Peter Nicholls
  • Special Award: Bee Gees (Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb)
  • Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Harry Mortimer
  • Songwriter of the Year: Tony Macaulay

Ivor Novello Awards 1979

The 1979 ceremony took place at Grosvenor House, in London.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Baker Street, written by Gerry Rafferty. Also nominated: Wuthering Heights, by Kate BushCan’t Smile Without You, performed by Barry Manilow, written by Chris Arnold, David Martin and Geoff Morrow
  • The Best Pop Song: Baker Street. Also nominated: Wuthering Heights; Night Fever, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • The Best Theme from a Radio or Television Production: Lillie, composed by Joseph Horovitz. Also nominated: Fawlty Towers, by Dennis Wilson; Hong Kong Beat, by Richard Denton and Martin Cook
  • The Best Film Score: The Silent Witness, composed by Alan Hawkshaw. Also nominated: Watership Down, by Angela Morley, Mike Batt and Malcolm Williamson; The 39 Steps, by Ed Welch
  • The Best Film Song: Bright Eyes, performed by Art Garfunkel, written by Mike Batt. Also nominated: Grease, perfoemd by Frankie Valli, written by Barry Gibb; Stayin’ Alive, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • The Outstanding British Lyric: The Man With The Child In His Eyes, written by Kate Bush. Also nominated: Railway Hotel, by Mike Batt; Baker Street
  • The Best Instrumental or Popular Orchestral Work: Song for Guy, composed by Elton John. Also nominated: Dr. Who, by Ron Grainer; Heartsong, by Gordon Giltrap
  • The International Hit of the Year: Stayin’ Alive. Also nominated: It’s a Heartache, performed by Bonnie Tyler, written by Ronnie Scott and Steve WolfeDreadlock Holiday, performed by 10cc, written by Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman
  • The Most Performed Work: Night Fever, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb. Also nominated: Mull of KintyreThe Floral Dance, performed by Terry Wogan, written by Kate Moss
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Night Fever. Also nominated: Rat Trap, performed by The Boomtown Rats, written by Bob Geldof; Matchstalk Men and Matchstalk Cats and Dogs
  • The Best British Musical: Evita, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: George Martin
  • Special Award for Services to British Songwriters: Victor Knight
  • Special Award for their Contribution to British Music: Jeff Lynne
  • Songwriters of the Year: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb

Further Reading

Ivor Novello Awards – The 1960s

Before we launch into the “Ivors” from the sixties, a quick word about the credits here. The Ivor Novello Awards are, unusually and entirely laudably, given for songwriting rather than performing, but that isn’t necessarily compatible with most people understand music. In the interests of context, I’ve therefore added performer names where I know them (but I didn’t bother researching them in a lot of detail, so please comment below if you see things you feel need changing!)

Apart from the usual pop suspects, it’s great to see awards and nominations for John Barry and Ron Grainer in amongst these lists!

Ivor Novello Awards 1960

The fifth Ivor Novello Awards were broadcast on BBC Television on 6th June 1960, with Eric Robinson conducting the Orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: Side Saddle, written by Russ Conway. Also nominated: Living Doll, by Lionel Bart
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: The Village of St. Bernadette, written by Eula Parker. Also nominated: Maybe This Year, by Ronald Wakley and Marcel Stellman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Item: The Ballad of Bethnal Green, written by Paddy Roberts. Also nominated: Little White Bull, by Michael Pratt, Lionel Bart and Tommy Steele
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Beaulieu Festival Suite, written by Kenny Graham. Also nominated: Jazzboatby Joe Henderson
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Windows of Parish, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Ring Ding, by Steve Race
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Lock Up Your Daughters, written by Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson. Also nominated: Meet The Familyby Peter Greenwell and Peter Wildeblood
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Lionel Bart

Ivor Novello Awards 1961

The 1961 ceremony was presented by W.E. Butlin, and broadcast on BBC Television on 20th May 1961. The broadcast was introduced by David Jacobs, and starred Max Bygraves, Georgia Brown, Matt Monro, Craig Douglas, Bert Weedon, Paddy Roberts, Max Harris and Douglas Gamley. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra which was led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: As Long As He Needs Me, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: Apache, performed by The Shadows, written by Jerry Lordan
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: Portrait Of My Love, written by Norman Newell and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: As Long As He Needs Me, by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Seashore, written by Robert Farnon. Also nominated: The Willow Waltz, by Cyril Watters
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Apache. Also nominated: Hit and Miss, by John Barry
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Oliver, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: The Gurney Slade Theme, by Max Harris
  • Judges’ Choice Award (any work which in the opinion of the Judges, is worthy of an Award, but which may not necessarily be governed by Existing Categories): Goodness Gracious Me, written by Herbert Kretzmer and David Lee. Also nominated: The Belle of Barking Creek, by Paddy Roberts
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Eric Maschwitz
  • Special Award: What Do You Want If You Don’t Want Money?, written by Johnny Worth

Ivor Novello Awards 1962

W.E. Butlin turned up again for the 1962 ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 13th May 1962. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Cliff Richard and The Shadows, Anthony Newley, Helen Shapiro and Her Hair, Matt Monro, Johnny Dankworth and His Orchestra, Tony Osborne, Ron Grainer and The Ivor Raymonde Singers. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: My Kind of Girl, written by Leslie Bricusse. Also nominated: Portrait of My Love, by Cyril Ornadel and Norman Newell
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1961 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Walkin’ Back To Happiness, written by Michael Hawker and John Schroeder. Also nominated: Are You Sure, by Bob Allison and John Allison
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: What Kind of Fool Am I?, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley. Also nominated: No Greater Love, by Michael Carr and Bunny Lewis
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: The Secrets of the Seine, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Stranger on the Shore, by Acker Bilk
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: African Waltz, written by Galt Macdermot. Also nominated: Duddly Dell, by Dudley Moore
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Stage Play: Stop The World I Want to Get Off, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: The Maigret Theme, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: The Avengers’ Theme, by Johnny Dankworth
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Cliff Richard and The Shadows

Ivor Novello Awards 1963

For the third year running, W.E. Butlin presented the eighth Ivor Novello ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 4th May 1963. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Acker Bilk, Matt Monro, The Tornados, Steve Race, Ron Grainer, Gordon Franks and Cliff Richard and The Shadows.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Stranger on the Shore, written by Acker Bilk. Also nominated: Wonderful Land, by Jerry Lordan
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1962 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Telstar, written by Joe Meek. Also nominated: Bachelor Boy, by Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: My Love and Devotion, written by Howard Barnes, Harold Fields and Joe Roncoroni. Also nominated: Jeannie, by Norman Newell and Russ Conway
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral or Other Non-Vocal Composition: Nicola, written by Steve Race. Also nominated: Turkish Coffee, by Tony Osborne
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: Outbreak of Murder, written by Gordon Franks. Also nominated: Revival, by Joe Harriott
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical: Summer Holiday, performed by Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Also nominated: Blitz, written by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: Steptoe and Son, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: March from A Little Suite, by Trevor Duncan
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Popular and Light Music: Lawrence Wright

Ivor Novello Awards 1964

As we now know, 1963 was the year when popular music changed for good, with The Beatles rising to fame. For the 1964 award ceremony, they evolved quickly, ditching most of the jazz instrumentals and switching to a heavy focus on the Fab Four.

  • The Most Broadcast Work of the Year: She Loves You, performed by The Beatles and written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Dance One, by Elaine Murtagh, Valerie Murtagh and Ray Adams
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1963 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: She Loves You, by The Beatles. Also nominated: I Want To Hold Your Hand, same artist
  • The Year’s Outstanding Song: If I Ruled The World, written by Leslie Bricusse and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: All My Loving, by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Carlos’ Theme, written by Ivor Slaney. Also nominated: Scarlett O’Hara, by Jerry Lordan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Jazz Work: What the Dickens, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Sweet September, by Bill McGuffie
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Show, For Stage, Cinema, Television or Radio: Theme from The Avengers, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Half a Sixpence, by David Heneker
  • The Year’s Most Amusing or Novel Composition: Flash, Bang, Wallop, written by David Heneker. Also nominated: Harvest of Love, by Benny Hill and Tony Hatch
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: The Beatles and some additional hangers-on (Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr)
  • Special Award in Recognition of Fifty Years’ Service to the Music Industry: Performing Rights Society

Ivor Novello Awards 1965

The tenth ceremony, somewhat hilariously sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin (yes, him), took place on 13th July 1965 at the Savoy Hotel.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Can’t Buy Me Love, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1964 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Can’t Buy Me Love. Also nominated: I Feel Fine, same artist
  • Outstanding Song of 1964: Downtown, written by Tony Hatch. Also nominated: Losing You, by Tom Springfield and Clive Westlake
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Bombay Duckling, written by Max Harris
  • The Year’s Outstanding Theme from Radio, TV or Film: Not So Much A Programme, More A Way Of Life, written by Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Robert and Elizabeth, written by Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar. Also nominated: Maggie May, written by Lionel Bart
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Paddy Roberts

Ivor Novello Awards 1966

The 1966 ceremony, also sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, took place at the Hammersmith Palais, London, and was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra. It was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 12th July 1966.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: I’ll Never Find Another You, written by Tom Springfield. Also nominated: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1965 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: We Can Work It Out, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Help
  • Outstanding Song of 1965: Yesterday, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Where Are You Now My Love, written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • The Year’s Outstanding Beat Song: It’s Not Unusual, performed by Tom Jones, written by Gordon Mills and Les Reed. Also nominated: Look Through Any Window, by Graham Gouldman and Charles Silverman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Composition: A Windmill In Old Amsterdam, written by Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge. Also nominated: Mrs Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter, written by Trevor Peacock
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Charlie Girl, written by David Heneker and John Taylor
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contemporary Folk Song: Catch the Wind, by Donovan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Instrumental Composition: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr. Also nominated: The Kiss, by Jack Parnell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: BBC TV, for the production of the series A Song For Europe

Ivor Novello Awards 1967

Still sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, the twelfth ceremony took place at the Lyceum Ballroom, London, was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra, and was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 27th March 1967.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Michelle, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Yesterday
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1966 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Yellow Submarine, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: What Would I Be, written by Jackie Trent
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Winchester Cathedral, written by Geoff Stephens. Also nominated: Call Me, written by Tony Hatch
  • Film Song of the Year: Born Free, written by John Barry and Don Black. Also nominated: Time Drags By, performed by The Shadows, written by Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch, Brian Bennett and John Rostill
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy?, written by Allan Smethurst. Also nominated: Dedicated Follower of Fashion, written by Ray Davies
  • Instrumental Composition of the Year: The Power Game, written by Wayne Hill. Also nominated: Khartoum, written by Frank Cordell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Joe Loss

Ivor Novello Awards 1968

For some reason, from 1968 onwards, history no longer seems to record the nominated but losing entries.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Puppet on a String, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1967 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: The Last Waltz, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: A Whiter Shade of Pale, performed by Procul Harum, written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid
  • Best British Song, Musically and Lyrically: She’s Leaving Home, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Grocer Jack, written by Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • Best Instrumental Theme: Love in the Open Air, written by Paul McCartney
  • Special Award: Leslie Bricusse, for The Film Score Doctor Dolittle
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Alan Herbert

Ivor Novello Awards 1969

The fourteenth Ivor Novello Awards were sponsored by the BBC, and took place on 22nd May 1969.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Congratulations, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1968 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Hey Jude, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Delilah, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • The Most Romantic Song of the Year: I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten, written by Clive Westlake
  • Outstanding Dance / Beat Song of the Year: Build Me Up Buttercup, written by Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • Novelty Song of the Year: I’m The Urban Spaceman, written by Neil Innes
  • Light Music Composition of the Year: Ring of Kerry, written by Peter Hope
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Andrew Gold (presented posthumously)

Further Reading

NME Award Winners 1994-2018 (Part Two)

Let’s now complete our summary of the NME Awards, with all the winners in one single, easy-to-digest place. So, as an extension of part two of the NME Poll Winners 1952-1992, here’s the final part!

Best Newcomer

Continuing the list that saw Cliff Richard and The Stone Roses share the limelight previously, these are the more recent newcomers.

Best New Artist

  • 1994 – Elastica (Best New Band), Credit to the Nation (Best New Solo Act)
  • 1995 – Oasis
  • 1996 – Supergrass
  • 1997 – Kula Shaker
  • 1998 – Embrace
  • 1999 – Gomez
  • 2000 – Muse
  • 2001 – Coldplay
  • 2002 – The Strokes
  • 2003 – The Libertines
  • 2004 – Kings of Leon
  • 2005 – Razorlight
  • 2006 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2007 – Klaxons
  • 2008 – The Enemy
  • 2009 – MGMT
  • 2010 – Bombay Bicycle Club
  • 2011 – Hurts
  • 2012 – The Vaccines
  • 2013 – Palma Violets
  • 2014 – Drenge
  • 2015 – Royal Blood
  • 2016 – Rat Boy
  • 2017 – Dua Lipa
  • 2018 – Stefflon Don

Philip Hall Under the Radar Award

  • 1995 – Gene
  • 1996 – Rocket from the Crypt
  • 1997 – Super Furry Animals
  • 2000 – Terris
  • 2001 – Starsailor
  • 2002 – The Coral
  • 2003 – Yeah Yeah Yeahs
  • 2005 – Kaiser Chiefs
  • 2006 – The Long Blondes
  • 2007 – The Twang
  • 2008 – Glasvegas
  • 2009 – The Big Pink
  • 2010 – The Drums
  • 2011 – The Naked and Famous
  • 2012 – The Child of Lov
  • 2014 – Fat White Family
  • 2018 – Pale Waves

Best Live Music Categories

Most award ceremonies now seem to recognise live music, but the NME Awards have been doing it since way back in the early 1990s.

Best Live Act

  • 1995 – Blur
  • 1996 – Oasis (Best Live Act), Pulp (NME Live Act of the Year)
  • 1997 – Manic Street Preachers
  • 2000 – Super Furry Animals (Best Live Act), Mogwai (NME Live Act of the Year)
  • 2001 – Moby
  • 2002 – U2
  • 2003 – The Datsuns
  • 2004 – Queens of the Stone Age
  • 2005 – Muse
  • 2006 – Franz Ferdinand
  • 2007 – Kasabian
  • 2008 – Muse
  • 2009 – Muse
  • 2010 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2011 – Biffy Clyro
  • 2012 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2013 – The Rolling Stones
  • 2014 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2015 – Royal Blood
  • 2016 – Wolf Alice
  • 2017 – The 1975
  • 2018 – Kasabian

Best Festival Headliner

  • 2017 – Adele
  • 2018 – Muse

Best Live Event

  • 1994 – Megadog
  • 1995 – Orbital at Glastonbury Festival
  • 1996 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 1997 – Oasis at Knebworth (Best Musical Event)
  • 1998 – Glastonbury Festival (Best Musical Event)
  • 1999 – Glastonbury Festival (Best Musical Event)
  • 2000 – Glastonbury Festival (Best Musical Event)
  • 2001 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds (Best Musical Event)
  • 2002 – Ozzfest (Best Musical Event)
  • 2003 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds (Best Musical Event)
  • 2005 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2006 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds (Best Musical Event)
  • 2007 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds
  • 2008 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds
  • 2009 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2010 – Blur at Hyde Park

Best Festival

  • 2010 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2011 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2012 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2013 – Carling Weekend – Reading and Leeds
  • 2014 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2015 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2016 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2017 – Glastonbury Festival
  • 2018 – Glastonbury Festival

Best Small Festival

  • 2011 – RockNess
  • 2012 – RockNess
  • 2013 – Festival No. 6
  • 2014 – Sŵn
  • 2015 – Liverpool Psych Fest
  • 2016 – End of the Road
  • 2017 – End of the Road
  • 2018 – Festival No. 6

Radio Session of the Year

  • 1997 – Suede (Radio 1 Evening Session of the Year)
  • 1998 – Radiohead (Radio 1 Evening Session of the Year)
  • 1999 – Junior Carter (Breezeblock Mix of the Year)
  • 2000 – Supergrass (Radio 1 Session of the Year), Ooberman (Best NME Premier Show Performance)
  • 2001 – Coldplay (Radio 1 Session of the Year)
  • 2002 – The Charlatans (Radio 1 Session of the Year)

Best Club / Live Venue

  • 1994 – The Forum
  • 1995 – Brixton Academy
  • 1996 – Brixton Academy
  • 1997 – Brixton Academy
  • 1998 – Brixton Academy
  • 1999 – Brixton Academy
  • 2000 – Brixton Academy
  • 2001 – Cream
  • 2003 – London Astoria
  • 2004 – Brixton Academy
  • 2005 – Brixton Academy
  • 2006 – Brixton Academy
  • 2007 – Brixton Academy
  • 2008 – Wembley Stadium

Tour Award

  • 2001 – Amen / JJ72 / Alfie
  • 2002 – Lostprophets / Andrew WK / The Coral

Genre-Specific Artist Categories

These are just a selection of the artist categories that relate to a particular genre of music.

Best Dance Act

  • 1994 – Orbital
  • 1996 – The Prodigy (Best Dance Act), Goldie (Vibes Award for Best Dance Act)
  • 1997 – The Prodigy (Best Dance Act), Orbital (Vibes Award for Best Dance Act)
  • 1998 – The Prodigy
  • 1999 – Fatboy Slim
  • 2000 – The Chemical Brothers (Best Dance Act), Death in Vegas (On the Decks Award for Best Dance Act)
  • 2001 – Fatboy Slim
  • 2002 – Basement Jaxx

Best Hip Hop / Rap Act

  • 1994 – Cypress Hill
  • 1995 – Warren G
  • 2001 – Eminem
  • 2002 – Missy Elliott

Best Metal Act

  • 2001 – Marilyn Manson
  • 2002 – Lostprophets

Best Rock Act

  • 2001 – U2

Best Pop Act

  • 2001 – All Saints
  • 2002 – Kylie Minogue

Best R&B / SOUL Act

  • 2001 – Kelis
  • 2002 – Aaliyah

One-off awards

There are a whole load of odd, eclectic, and occasionally wonderful one-off awards. Here are all the ones I could find.

One-off Awards

  • 1996 – Special Award for Services Beyond the Call of Duty – Tony Crean
  • 1999 – Brain That Should Be Kept Alive for Posterity – Nicky Wire
  • 1999 – Would Make the Best Drugs Czar – Shaun Ryder
  • 1999 – Would To See On A Blind Date – Marilyn Manson and Billie Piper
  • 1999 – Would Most Like as Your Doctor – Natalie Imbruglia
  • 1999 – Would Most Like to Go Shopping with – Brian Molko
  • 1999 – Would Most Like to Cook You a Meal – Tiny Woods
  • 1999 – Would Most Like to Be Marooned on a Desert Island with – Louise
  • 1999 – Would Most Like as Prime Minister – Nicky Wire
  • 1999 – Most Like as Your Driving Instructor – Jay Kay
  • 1999 – Most Like to See in a Ring with Mike Tyson – Billie Piper
  • 2004 – Fight of the Year – Jack White vs. Jason von Bondie
  • 2004 – Living Legend – Arthur Lee
  • 2004 – Most Missed – Johnny Cash
  • 2005 – Special Award for Lifelong Service to Music – John Peel
  • 2010 – Giving it Back Fan Award – Lily Allen
  • 2014 – Songwriters’ Songwriter – Paul McCartney
  • 2016 – Best Actor – Idris Elba
  • 2016 – Best Actress – Vicky McClure
  • 2016 – Vlogger of the Year – KSI

Best Solo Artist

In earlier decades, this award had been split pretty arbitrarily, and this continues. I’ve grouped these into British and International, since this is what they are currently going with, but we’re actually looking at about six different award categories here.

Best British Solo Artist

  • 1995 – Paul Weller (Best Solo Artist)
  • 1996 – Paul Weller (Best Solo Artist)
  • 1999 – Robbie Williams (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2001 – Badly Drawn Boy (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2002 – Ian Brown (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2005 – Graham Coxon (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2007 – Jamie T (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2008 – Kate Nash (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2009 – Pete Doherty (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2010 – Jamie T (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2011 – Laura Marling (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2012 – Florence + the Machine (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2013 – Florence + the Machine (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2014 – Lily Allen (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2015 – Jake Bugg (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2016 – Charlie XCX
  • 2017 – M.I.A. (Female), Skepta (Male)
  • 2018 – Loyle Carner

Best International Solo Artist

  • 1994 – Björk (Best Solo Artist)
  • 1997, 1998, 2000 – Beck (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2003-2004 – Ryan Adams (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2006 – Kanye West (Best Solo Artist)
  • 2016 – Taylor Swift
  • 2017 – Christine and the Queens (Female), Frank Ocean (Male)
  • 2018 – Lorde

Best DJ

  • 2000 – Fatboy Slim
  • 2001 – Carl Cox

Best Group

Next, here are the categories for best group – of which there are still many.

Best British Band

  • 1994 – Suede (Best Band)
  • 1995 – Blur (Best Band)
  • 1996-1997 – Oasis (Best Band)
  • 1998 – The Verve (Best Band)
  • 1999 – Manic Street Preachers (Best Band)
  • 2000 – Blur (Best Band), Travis (NME Band of the Year)
  • 2001 – Radiohead (Best Band)
  • 2003 – Oasis (Best British Band and NME Band of the Year)
  • 2004-2005 – The Libertines
  • 2006 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2007 – Muse
  • 2008 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2009 – Oasis
  • 2010-2011 – Muse
  • 2012 – Kasabian
  • 2013 – Biffy Clyro
  • 2014 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2015 – Kasabian
  • 2016 – The Maccabees
  • 2017 – Biffy Clyro
  • 2018 – Alt-J

Best International Band

  • 2002 – The Strokes (Best Band)
  • 2003 – The Hives
  • 2004 – Kings of Leon
  • 2005 – The Killers
  • 2006 – The Strokes
  • 2007 – My Chemical Romance
  • 2008-2009 – The Killers
  • 2010 – Paramore
  • 2011 – My Chemical Romance
  • 2012 – Foo Fighters
  • 2013 – The Killers
  • 2014 – Haim
  • 2015 – Foo Fighters
  • 2016 – Run the Jewels
  • 2017 – Metallica
  • 2018 – Haim

Best Band Ever

  • 2000 – The Beatles

Worst Band

  • 1997 – Oasis
  • 2003 – Nickelback
  • 2005 – Insane Clown Posse
  • 2006 – Son of Dork
  • 2007 – Panic! At the Disco
  • 2008 – The Hoosiers
  • 2009-2011 – Jonas Brothers
  • 2012-2013 – One Direction
  • 2014 – The 1975
  • 2015-2017 – 5 Seconds of Summer

Best Collaboration

  • 2018 – Craig David and Bastille

Most Dedicated Fans / Best Fan Community

  • 2012-2013 – Muse
  • 2014 – Arctic Monkeys
  • 2015 – Muse
  • 2016 – The Libertines

Best of All Time Awards

Finally, NME introduced the Godlike Genius Award in 1994, and have therefore followed with a suite of “best of all time” awards.

Godlike Genius Award

  • 1994 – John Peel
  • 1995 – Alan McGee
  • 1996 – Michael Eavis
  • 1997 – Mark E. Smith
  • 1999 – Massive Attack
  • 2000 – Shaun Ryder
  • 2001 – U2
  • 2002 – Nick Kent and Pennie Smith
  • 2005 – New Order and Joy Division
  • 2006 – Ian Brown
  • 2007 – Primal Scream
  • 2008 – Manic Street Preachers
  • 2009 – The Cure
  • 2010 – Paul Weller
  • 2011 – Dave Grohl
  • 2012 – Noel Gallagher
  • 2013 – Johnny Marr
  • 2014 – Blondie
  • 2015 – Suede
  • 2016 – Coldplay
  • 2017 – Pet Shop Boys
  • 2018 – Liam Gallagher

Outstanding Contribution to Music

  • 2002 – The Charlatans
  • 2009 – Elbow
  • 2010 – The Specials
  • 2011 – PJ Harvey
  • 2012 – Pulp
  • 2013 – The Cribs
  • 2014 – Belle and Sebastian
  • 2017 – WIley

The Fuck Me! / John Peel Award for Innovation / NME Innovation Award

  • 2003 – The Polyphonic Spree
  • 2004 – Dizzee Rascal
  • 2005 – The Others
  • 2006 – Gorillaz
  • 2007 – Enter Shikari
  • 2008 – Radiohead
  • 2011 – Crystal Castles
  • 2014 – Damon Albarn
  • 2018 – Boy Better Know

NME Icon

  • 2018 – Shirley Manson

And that concludes the results of the NME Polls and Awards, from 1954 to 2018. Join us in 2019 for another new ceremony!

NME Awards – 2015-2017

Finally, by the current decade, NME seemed to have regained their taste. Several decades after being obsessed with guitars and the lower reaches of the charts, they finally even decided to associate themselves with acts such as Pet Shop Boys. Let’s complete our journey through the history of their awards, with the last few years.

NME Awards 2015

  • Godlike Genius Award: Suede
  • Best British Band: Kasabian. Also nominated: Alt-J, Arctic Monkeys, Chvrches, Royal Blood, The Libertines
  • Best Album: Kasabian, for 48:13
  • Also nominated: Jamie T, for Carry On The Grudge, La Roux, for Trouble In Paradise, Royal Blood, for Royal Blood, Run The Jewels, for Run The Jewels 2, St Vincent, for St Vincent
  • Best International Band: Foo Fighters. Also nominated: Arcade Fire, Haim, Interpol, Queens Of The Stone Age, Tame Impala
  • Best Live Band: Royal Blood. Also nominated: Arctic Monkeys, Fat White Family, Foo Fighters, Kasabian, The Libertines
  • Best New Band: Royal Blood. Also nominated: Circa Waves, FKA Twigs, Jungle, Slaves, Superfood
  • Best Solo Artist: Jake Bugg. Also nominated: Jack White, Jamie T, La Roux, Lana Del Rey, St Vincent
  • Best Festival: Glastonbury. Also nominated: Bestival, Isle Of Wight Festival, Latitude, Reading & Leeds, T In The Park
  • Best Track: Jamie T, for Zombie. Also nominated: Future Islands, for Seasons (Waiting On You), Jungle, for Busy Earnin, Kasabian, for Eez-Eh, Noel Gallagher, for In The Heat Of The Moment, Royal Blood, for Little Monster
  • Best Video: Jamie T, for Zombie. Also nominated: Fat White Family, for Touch The Leather, FKA Twigs, for Two Weeks, Jungle, for Busy Earnin’, Peace, for Lost On Me, Royal Blood, for Figure It Out
  • Best Music Film: Pulp, for A Film About Life, Death and Supermarkets. Also nominated: 20,000 Days On Earth, Finding Fela, Kasabian, for Summer Solstice, Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon, The Possibilities Are Endless
  • Best Film: Northern Soul. Also nominated: Boyhood, Frank, Get On Up, God Help The Girl, The Inbetweeners 2
  • Best TV Show: Game of Thrones. Also nominated: Girls, Foo Fighters, for Sonic Highways, Peaky Blinders, Sherlock, True Detective
  • Best Dancefloor Filler: Iggy Azalea feat. Charli XCX, for Fancy. Also nominated: Jamie T, for Zombie, Kasabian, for Eez-Eh, Mark Ronson & Bruno Mars, for Uptown Funk, Metronomy, for Love Letters, SBTRKT feat. Ezra Koenig, for New Dorp. New York
  • Worst Band: 5 Seconds of Summer. Also nominated: , Bastille, Blink 182, One Direction, The 1975, U2
  • Villain of the Year: Nigel Farage. Also nominated: Bono, David Cameron, Harry Styles, Russell Brand, Taylor Swift
  • Hero of the Year: Alex Turner. Also nominated: Dave Grohl, Kate Bush, Noel Gallagher, Russell Brand, Taylor Swift
  • Music Moment of the Year: Jamie T‘s comeback. Also nominated: Alex Turner’s Brit Awards speech, Kasabian headline Glastonbury, Kate Bush returns, The Libertines reunite, Nirvana reunite at The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame
  • Best Fan Community: Muse. Also nominated: Jamie T, Kasabian, La Roux, Peace, Royal Blood
  • Small Festival of the Year: Liverpool Psych Fest. Also nominated: End Of The Road, Festival No. 6, Field Day, The Great Escape, Tramlines
  • Book of the Year: Viv Albertine, for Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys
  • Also nominated: Bernard Sumner, for Chapter And Verse, Ian Curtis, Deborah Curtis and Jon Savage, for So This Is Permanence, Jesse Frohman, for Kurt Cobain: The Last Session, John Lydon, for Anger Is An Energy: My Life Uncensored, Steve Hanley, for The Big Midweek: Life Inside The Fall
  • Reissue of the Year: Manic Street Preachers, for The Holy Bible. Also nominated: Led Zeppelin, for Led Zeppelin II, Oasis, for Definitely Maybe, Pixies, for Doolittle, Public Enemy, for It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back, Smashing Pumpkins, for Adore
  • Best Band Social Media: Liam Gallagher‘s Twitter. Also nominated: Questlove’s Twitter, Alana Haim’s Twitter, Albert Hammond Jr’s Twitter, Fat White Family’s Facebook, Slaves’ Facebook

NME Awards 2016

  • Godlike Genius Award: Coldplay
  • Best British Band: The Maccabees. Also nominated: The Libertines, Foals, Wolf Alice, The 1975, Catfish and the Bottlemen
  • Best International Band: Run the Jewels. Also nominated: Tame Impala, Foo Fighters, The Strokes, The Killers, Alabama Shakes
  • Best New Artist: Rat Boy. Also nominated: Hinds, Halsey, Yak, Låpsley, Formation
  • Best British Solo Artist: Charli XCX. Also nominated: Adele, Noel Gallagher, Ed Sheeran, Florence Welch, Skepta
  • Best International Solo Artist: Taylor Swift. Also nominated: Kendrick Lamar, Lana Del Rey, Courtney Barnett, Kanye West, Grimes
  • Best Live Band: Wolf Alice. Also nominated: The Maccabees, The Libertines, Foals, Catfish and the Bottlemen, Royal Blood
  • Best Album: Foals, for What Went Down. Also nominated: Wolf Alice, for My Love Is Cool, The Maccabees, for Marks to Prove it, Kendrick Lamar, for To Pimp a Butterfly, Tame Impala, for Currents, Grimes, for Art Angels
  • Best Track: Wolf Alice, for Giant Peach. Also nominated: Coldplay, for Adventure of a Lifetime, The Libertines, for Gunga Din, The Weeknd, for I Can’t Feel My Face, Skepta, for Shut Down, Foals, for What Went Down
  • Best TV Show: This is England ’90. Also nominated: The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones, American Horror Story, Peep Show, Gogglebox
  • Best Film: Beasts of No Nation. Also nominated: Ex Machina, Spectre, Mad Max: Fury Road, Whiplash, Kill Your Friends
  • Best Music Film: Blur, for New World Towers. Also nominated: Amy, Montage of Heck, Straight Outta Compton, What Happened, Miss Simone, The Reflektor Tapes
  • Best Music Video: Slaves, for Cheer Up London. Also nominated: Rihanna, for Bitch Better Have My Money, The Libertines, for Heart Of The Matter, Wolf Alice, for You’re a Germ, Blur, for Ong Ong, Tame Impala, for The Less I Know The Better
  • Best Actor: Idris Elba. Also nominated: Tom Hardy, Eddie Redmayne, Nicholas Hoult, Stephen Graham, Daniel Radcliffe
  • Best Actress: Vicky McClure. Also nominated: Jennifer Lawrence, Emilia Clarke, Gemma Chan, Amy Schumer, Saoirse Ronan
  • Best Reissue: David Bowie, for Five Years (1969–1973). Also nominated: A Tribe Called Quest, for People’s Instinctive Travels And the Paths Of Rhythm, The Velvet Underground, for Loaded, Rolling Stones, for Sticky Fingers, Tori Amos, for Under The Pink, Faith No More, for Angel Dust
  • Best Book: Patti Smith, for M Train. Also nominated: Grace Jones, for I’ll Never Write My MemoirsElvis Costello, for Unfaithful Music & Disappearing InkCarrie Brownstein, for Hunger Makes Me A Modern GirlProfessor Green, for LuckyTom Jones, for Over The Top And Back
  • Best Festival: Glastonbury. Also nominated: Reading & Leeds, V Festival, T in the Park, Bestival, Isle of Wight
  • Best Small Festival: End of the Road. Also nominated: Sŵn, Festival No. 6, Green Man, Liverpool Sound City, Kendall Calling
  • Music Moment of the Year: The Libertines‘ secret Glastonbury set. Also nominated: The return of AdeleDave Grohl breaks leg and carries on, Florence + The Machine headlines Glastonbury, Kanye at The Brits, One Direction ‘split’
  • Best Fan Community: The Libertines. Also nominated: Hurts, Muse, Catfish and the Bottleman, The 1975, Wolf Alice
  • Worst Band: 5 Seconds of Summer. Also nominated: One Direction, Little Mix, Sleaford Mods, U2, Nickelback
  • Villain of the Year: Donald Trump. Also nominated: David Cameron, Chris Moyles, Kanye West, George Osbourne, Simon Cowell
  • Hero of the Year: Dave Grohl. Also nominated: Adele, Jeremy Corbyn, Florence Welch, Kanye West, Taylor Swift
  • Vlogger of the Year: KSI. Also nominated: Vikkstar123, Charlie McDonnell, Joe Weller, Danisnotonfire, Savannah Brown

NME Awards 2017

  • Godlike Genius Award: Pet Shop Boys
  • Best British Band: Biffy Clyro. Also nominated: Wolf Alice, The 1975, Bastille, Years & Years, The Last Shadow Puppets
  • Best International Band: Metallica. Also nominated: Tame Impala, Kings Of Leon, Green Day, A Tribe Called Quest, Tegan and Sara
  • Best New Artist: Dua Lipa. Also nominated: Blossoms, Zara Larsson, Sunflower Bean, Christine and The Queens, Anderson .Paak
  • Best British Female Artist: M.I.A.. Also nominated: Dua Lipa, Adele, Charli XCX, Kate Tempest, PJ Harvey
  • Best British Male Artist: Skepta. Also nominated: Zayn Malik, Kano, Jamie T, Michael Kiwanuka, Richard Ashcroft
  • Best International Female Artist: Christine and the Queens. Also nominated: Sia, Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Solange, Tove Lo
  • Best International Male Artist: Frank Ocean. Also nominated: Kanye West, Drake, The Weeknd, Kendrick Lamar, Chance The Rapper
  • Best Festival Headliner: Adele. Also nominated: Coldplay, Radiohead, Biffy Clyro, Foals, The Stone Roses
  • Best Live Band: The 1975. Also nominated: Bastille, Slaves, Bring Me The Horizon, Christine And The Queens, Wolf Alice
  • Best Album: Bastille, for Wild World. Also nominated: Kanye West, for The Life Of Pablo, Skepta, for Konnichiwa, The 1975, for I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It, Radiohead, for A Moon Shaped Pool, Beyoncé, for Lemonade
  • Best Track: Christine and the Queens, for Tilted. Also nominated: Tove Lo, for Cool Girl, Charli XCX, for After The Afterparty, Skepta, for Man, Bastille, for Good Grief, The 1975, for Somebody Else
  • Best TV Show: Fleabag. Also nominated: Stranger Things, Game Of Thrones, Black Mirror, Humans, People Just Do Nothing
  • Best Film: My Scientology Movie. Also nominated: DeadpoolCaptain America: Civil War, Suicide Squad, Everybody Wants Some!!, Hunt For The Wilderpeople
  • Best Music Film: Oasis, for Supersonic, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, for One More Time With Feeling, Sing Street, Gimme Danger, The Rolling Stones, for Havana Moon, The Beatles, for Eight Days A Week – The Touring Years
  • Best Music Video: Slaves, for Consume or Be Consumed. Also nominated: Kanye West, for Famous, Beyoncé, for Formation, Radiohead, for Burn The Witch, Rat Boy, for Get Over It, Wolf Alice, for Lisbon
  • Best Reissue: Oasis, for Be Here Now. Also nominated: R.E.M., for Out Of Time, Pink Floyd, for Meddle, Michael Jackson, for Off The Wall, DJ Shadow, for Endtroducing, Blur, for Leisure
  • Best Book: Johnny Marr, for Set the Boy Free
  • Best Festival: Glastonbury. Also nominated: Reading & Leeds, Download, Isle Of Wight, Primavera, V Festival
  • Best Small Festival: End of the Road. Also nominated: Y Not, Green Man, Festival No. 6, Kendall Calling, Slam Dunk
  • Music Moment of the Year: Coldplay‘s Viola Beach tribute at Glastonbury. Also nominated: Bring Me The Horizon invade Coldplay’s table at NME Awards 2016, Beyoncé drops Lemonade, Skepta wins Mercury Prize, Pete Doherty plays The Bataclan, The Stone Roses’ first new music in 20 years
  • Worst Band: 5 Seconds of Summer. Also nominated: The Chainsmokers, Clean Bandit, Honey G, Nickelback, Twenty One Pilots
  • Villain of the Year: Nigel Farage. Also nominated: Donald Trump, David Cameron, Boris Johnson, Martin Shkreli, Katie Hopkins
  • Hero of the Year: Beyoncé. Also nominated: David Bowie, Adele, Millie Bobby Brown, Gary Lineker, Liam Gallagher
  • Outstanding Contribution to Music: Wiley

See also

NME Awards – 2000-2003

The 2000s was, of course, the decade when nothing could be achieved without a heavy dose of corporate sponsorship, so the NME Awards flitted from Carling to Shockwave and the awards all gained individual sponsors. Let’s take a look at the first half of that decade.

NME Premier Awards 2000

Hosted at the Mermaid Theatre in London on 1 February 2000, by Steve Lamacq and Mary Anne Hobbs.

  • Philip Hall On Award: Terris
  • Live Act of the Year: Mogwai
  • Best Live Act: Super Furry Animals
  • On the Decks Award for Dance Act of the Year: Death in Vegas
  • Carling Premier Best New Artist: Muse
  • Breezeblack Mix of 1999: Junior Carter
  • Best Solo Artist: Beck
  • Best Album Ever: The Stone Roses, for The Stone Roses
  • Best Single Ever: Nirvana, for Smells Like Teen Spirit
  • Total Genius Of The Year: Ali G
  • Greatest Musical Event Ever: Woodstock
  • Best Radio Show: Radio 1 Evening Session
  • Carling Premier Best LP: The Flaming Lips, for The Soft Bulletin
  • NME Album of the Year: The Flaming Lips, for The Soft Bulletin
  • NME Single of the Year: Aphex Twin, for Windowlicker
  • Best TV Show: The Royle Family
  • Musical Event of the Year: Glastonbury
  • Best Venue: Brixton Academy
  • Dickhead of the Year: Robbie Williams
  • Best Website: NME
  • Worst Record Of The Year: The Vengaboys, for We’re Going to Ibiza
  • Best Film: The Blair Witch Project
  • Best DJ: Fatboy Slim
  • NME.COM Award for Best NME Premier Show Performance: Ooberman
  • Best Dance Act: The Chemical Brothers
  • Best Music Video: Blur, for Coffee and TV
  • Best Band: Blur
  • Best Single: Blur, for Tender
  • Best Band Ever: The Beatles
  • Godlike Genius Award for Services to Music: Shaun Ryder
  • Radio 1 Evening Session Session of the Year: Supergrass
  • Artist of the Year: Travis

NME Awards 2001

Hosted at Planit Arches, London, on 6 February 2001, by Peter Kay.

  • Best Band: Radiohead. Also nominated: ColdplayOasisPrimal ScreamU2
  • Best Dance Act: Fatboy Slim. Also nominated: Artful DodgerMobySoniqueUnderworld
  • Best Radio Show: Steve LamacqThe Evening Session. Also nominated: Mark Radcliffe and Lard (Mark Riley), Chris MoylesJohn PeelDreem Team
  • Best Metal Act: Marilyn Manson. Also nominated: At the Drive-InLimp BizkitQueens of the Stone AgeSlipknot
  • Best Club DJ: Carl Cox. Also nominated: Fatboy SlimDavid HolmesJudge JulesPaul Oakenfold
  • Radio 1 Evening Session of the Year: Coldplay
  • Best New Artist: Coldplay. Also nominated: At the Drive-InBadly Drawn BoyDovesJJ72
  • Best Single: Coldplay, for Yellow. Also nominated: Blur, for Music is My RadarEminem, for StanLimp Bizkit, for Take a Look AroundOasis, for Go Let it Out
  • NME Carling Awards Tour Award: Amen / JJ72 / Alfie
  • Best Rock Act: U2. Also nominated: OasisManic Street PreachersAC/DCThe Beatles
  • Hero of the Year: Liam Gallagher
  • Godlike Genius: U2
  • Best Hip Hop/Rap Act (presented by Run DMC): Eminem. Also nominated: Cypress HillDr. DreOutkastWu-Tang Clan
  • Villain of the Year: Robbie Williams
  • Philip Hall Award – Brightest Hope for 2001: Starsailor
  • Best Pop Act: All Saints. Also nominated: FiveMadonnaS Club 7Britney Spears
  • Best Club: Cream. Also nominated: Fabric, Gatecrasher, Home, Rock City
  • Best Album: Primal Scream, for XTRMNTR. Also nominated: Badly Drawn Boy, for The Hour of BewilderbeastColdplay, for ParachutesEminem, for The Marshall Mathers LPRadiohead, for Kid A
  • Best R&B/Soul Act: Kelis. Also nominated: Craig DavidDestiny’s ChildMacy GraySugababes
  • Best Solo Artist: Badly Drawn Boy
  • Best Film: Gladiator
  • Musical Event of the Year: Carling Weekend Reading and Leeds. Also nominated: Glastonbury, OasisRadiohead, T in the Park
  • NME.com Fans Award for Best Live Act: Moby
  • Best TV Programme: The League of Gentlemen. Also nominated: The Royle FamilyThe SimpsonsTrigger Happy TVThe Sopranos

NME Carling Awards 2002

Hosted at Planit Arches, London, on 25 February 2002, by Zane Lowe.

  • Best New Act: The Strokes. Also nominated: Gorillaz, Linkin Park, Starsailor, The White Stripes
  • Band of the Year: The Strokes. Also nominated: The CharlatansRadioheadU2The White Stripes
  • Album of the Year: The Strokes, for Is This It. Also nominated: The Charlatans, for WonderlandMuse, for Origins of SymmetryRadiohead, for AmnesiacSlipknot, for Iowa
  • Best Pop Act: Kylie Minogue. Also nominated: Britney SpearsMadonnaS Club 7Robbie Williams
  • Best Solo Artist: Ian Brown. Also nominated: Ryan AdamsPJ HarveyKylie MinogueAndrew WK
  • Best Music Video: Radiohead, for Pyramid Song. Also nominated: Basement Jaxx, for Where’s Your Head AtFatboy Slim, for Weapon of ChoiceGorillaz, for Clint EastwoodU2, for Elevation
  • Best Live Act: U2. Also nominated: Ash, Linkin Park, Muse, Radiohead
  • Outstanding Contribution to NME: The Charlatans
  • Best Radio 1 Session: The Charlatans
  • Best Heavy Metal Group: Lostprophets. Also nominated: Andrew WKLinkin ParkSlipknotSystem of a Down
  • Honorary NME Carling Tour Award: Lostprophets
  • Honorary NME Carling Tour Award: Andrew WK
  • Honorary NME Carling Tour Award: The Coral
  • Philip Hall On Award: The Coral
  • Best Radio Show: The Evening Session
  • Best Hip-Hop/Rap Act: Missy Elliott. Also nominated: Bubba SparxxEminemD12OutkastRoots Manuva
  • Best R&B/Soul Act: Aaliyah. Also nominated: Alicia KeysCraig DavidDestiny’s ChildSo Solid Crew
  • Best Dance Act: Basement Jaxx. Also nominated: The AvalanchesAphex TwinDaft PunkFatboy Slim
  • Best TV Show: The Office. Also nominated: JackassLater with Jools HollandThe SimpsonsThe Sopranos
  • Best Film: Moulin Rouge. Also nominated: American Pie 2Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s StoneLord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the RingShrek
  • Godlike Genius Award: Nick Kent and Pennie Smith
  • Best Single: Ash, for Burn Baby Burn. Also nominated: Ian Brown, for FearDandy Warhols, for Bohemian Like YouGorillaz, for Clint EastwoodKylie Minogue, for Can’t Get You Out of My Head, and The Strokes, for Hard to Explain

NME Carling Awards 2003

Hosted at Hammersmith Palais, London, 13 February 2003, by Bill Bailey.

  • Best Album: Coldplay, for A Rush of Blood to the Head
  • Album of the Year: Coldplay, for A Rush of Blood to the Head
  • NME Artist of the Year: Oasis. Also nominated: Black Rebel Motorcycle ClubColdplayEminemPinkThe Vines
  • Best UK Band: Oasis
  • Best New Band: The Libertines
  • Best Live Band: The Datsuns. Also nominated: The HivesMuseOasisThe Polyphonic SpreeThe Vines
  • Best Radio Show: Steve Lamacq (The Evening SessionLamacq Live). Also nominated: Chris MoylesMary Anne Hobbs (The Breezeblock), Gary CrowleyMark Radcliffe and Lard (Mark Riley), John Peel
  • Greatest Music Moment of the Year: Ozzfest. Also nominated: Oasis at Finsbury Park, Glastonbury Festival, Reading and Leeds Festivals, T in the Park, V2002
  • Best Single: The Vines, for Get Free. Also nominated: Foo Fighters, for All My LifeQueens of the Stone Age, for No One KnowsDoves, for There Goes the FearColdplay, for The ScientistAsh, for Envy
  • Single of the Year: Doves, for There Goes the Fear
  • Best International Band: The Hives
  • The Fuck Me! Award For Innovation: The Polyphonic Spree
  • Philip Hall Radar Award: Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Also nominated: JetThe KillsKings of LeonThe ThrillsThe Warlocks
  • Best International Band: The Hives. Also nominated: Black Rebel Motorcycle ClubFoo FightersThe VinesThe White Stripes
  • Best Video: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, for Whatever Happened To My Rock And Roll (Punk Song)
  • Best Solo Artist: Ryan Adams. Also nominated: EminemAvril LavigneMs. Dynamite, PinkThe Streets
  • Hero of the Year: Ozzy Osbourne. Also nominated: Graham CoxonLiam GallagherDave GrohlChris MartinCraig Nicholls
  • Hottest Woman: Avril Lavigne. Also nominated: Karen OCharlotte HatherleyChristina AguileraMegan Martha WhiteKylie Minogue
  • Hottest Man: Chris Martin. Also nominated: Liam GallagherFabrizio MorettiCraig NichollsDave GrohlJulian Casablancas
  • Best TV Show: The Osbournes. Also nominated: The OfficeJackassGonzoI’m Alan PartridgePhoenix Nights
  • Best Live Venue: London Astoria. Also nominated: Brixton Academy, Barrowland Ballroom, Shepherd’s Bush Empire, Rock City, O2 Academy Birmingham
  • Best Haircut: Liam Gallagher. Also nominated: Didz HammondCraig NichollsDave GrohlFabrizio MorettiJack White
  • Best Dressed: The Hives
  • Best Website: NME. OasisFoo FightersBlack Rebel Motorcycle Club, Popbitch
  • Event of the Year: Reading and Leeds Festivals
  • Villain of the Year: Robbie Williams
  • Worst Album: Robbie Williams, for Escapology, Gareth Gates, for What My Heart Wants to SayThe Streets, for Original Pirate MaterialThe Vines, for Highly EvolvedWestlife, for UnbreakableColdplay, for A Rush of Blood to the Head
  • Worst Single: Robbie Williams – ‘Feel’
  • Worst Band: Nickelback. Also nominated: S Club JuniorsWestlifeStereophonicsAtomic KittenBlue
  • Worst Haircut: Jack Osbourne. Also nominated: Gareth GatesKelly OsbourneKelly JonesPinkChad Kroeger
  • Worst Dressed: Christina Aguilera

See also

NME Awards 2018

Apparently it’s actually called the V05 NME Awards this year, although honestly I’ve no idea what a V05 is. Anyway, here are the winners, in all their corporate glory!

Best British Band supported by Zig-Zag

  • Alt-J
  • Kasabian
  • Wolf Alice
  • The 1975
  • The xx
  • Bastille

Winner: Alt-J

Best International Band supported by 19 Crimes Winery

  • Haim
  • The National
  • Foo Fighters
  • The Killers
  • Paramore
  • Migos

Winner: Haim

Best British Solo Artist supported by VO5

  • Dua Lipa
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Stormzy
  • Loyle Carner
  • Charli XCX

Winner: Loyle Carner

Best International Solo Artist

  • Kendrick Lamar
  • Taylor Swift
  • Lorde
  • Lana Del Rey
  • St Vincent
  • Father John Misty

Winner: Lorde

Best Live Artist supported by Nikon

  • Kasabian
  • Lorde
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Stormzy
  • LCD Soundsystem
  • Royal Blood

Winner: Kasabian

Best Album supported by Orange Amplification

  • Lorde – Melodrama
  • J Hus – Common Sense
  • Wolf Alice – Visions of a Life
  • Gorillaz – Humanz’
  • Loyle Carner – Yesterday’s Gone
  • The National – Sleep Well Beast

Winner: J Hus

Best New Artist supported by Vans

  • Stefflon Don
  • Sigrid
  • SZA
  • Shame
  • J Hus
  • The Magic Gang

Winner: Stefflon Don

Best Track supported by Estrella Galicia

  • Kasabian – God Bless This Acid House
  • Kendrick Lamar – Humble
  • Lorde – Green Light
  • The Horrors – Something to Remember Me By
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Charli XCX – Boys

Winner: Charli XCX

Best Mixtape supported by Bulldog Gin

  • Charli XCX – Pop 2
  • Drake – More Life
  • Krept & Konan – 7 Nights / 7 Days
  • Rex Orange County – Apricot Princess
  • Dave – Game Over
  • Avelino – No Bullshit

Winner: Avelino

Best Music Video supported by Princess Yachts

  • The Big Moon – Sucker
  • Charli XCX – Boys
  • St Vincent – Los Ageless
  • Taylor Swift – Look What You Made Me Do
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Pale Waves – Television Romance

Winner: The Big Moon

Under The Radar Award supported by HMV

Winner: Pale Waves

Best Collaboration supported by VO5

  • Craig David & Bastille – I Know You
  • Stefflon Don & Skepta – Ding-a-Ling
  • Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile – Lotta See Lice
  • Gorillaz & Jehnny Beth – We Got the Power
  • Lily Allen & Giggs – Trigger Bang
  • Yungen & Yxng Bane – Bestie

Winner: Craig David and Bastille

Best Festival supported by ID&C

  • Glastonbury
  • Reading & Leeds
  • Download
  • Parklife
  • TRNSMT
  • Bestival

Winner: Glastonbury

Best Small Festival

  • Festival Number 6
  • Boardmasters
  • Wilderness
  • Field Day
  • End of the Road
  • Kendal Calling

Winner: Festival Number 6

Best Festival Headliner supported by Anna Valley

  • Muse
  • Boy Better Know
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Foo Fighters
  • The 1975
  • Noel Gallagher

Winner: Muse

Music Moment of the Year

  • Grime4Corbyn
  • Lady Gaga at the Superbowl
  • One Love Manchester
  • The Killers‘ surprise set at Glastonbury
  • Linkin Park‘s Chester Bennington tribute concert
  • Noel Gallagher plays Don’t Look Back in Anger at Manchester Arena

Winner: One Love Manchester

Best Film supported by Zig-Zag

  • T2
  • Bladerunner 2049
  • Baby Driver
  • The Disaster Artist
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • It

Winner: Baby Driver

Best TV Series

  • Stranger Things 2
  • Game of Thrones
  • Westworld
  • Rick & Morty
  • Glow
  • Peaky Blinders

Winner: Stranger Things

Best Music Film

  • Lady Gaga – Five Foot Two
  • L7 – Pretend We’re Dead
  • Sleaford Mods – Bunch of Kunst
  • George Michael – Freedom
  • England is Mine
  • Whitney Houston – Can I Be Me

Winner: Lady Gaga

Best Re-Issue

  • Radiohead – OK NOT OK
  • Prince – Purple Rain
  • The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • R.E.M. – Automatic for the People
  • The Smiths – The Queen is Dead
  • Super Furry Animals – Radiator

Winner: Radiohead

Best Book

  • Wiley – Eskiboy
  • Action Bronson – Fuck, That’s Delicious
  • Dylan Jones – David Bowie: A Life
  • Allan Jones – Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down
  • Lizzy Goodman – Meet Me In The Bathroom
  • The KLF – 2023: A Trilogy

Winner: Wiley

NME Icon

Winner: Shirley Manson

NME Innovation Award

Winner: Boy Better Know

Godlike Genius

Winner: Liam Gallagher

Hero of the Year

  • Ariana Grande
  • Rose McGowan
  • Jeremy Corbyn
  • Ellie Rowsell
  • Big Shaq
  • David Attenborough

Winner: Ariana Grande

Villain of the Year

  • Donald Trump
  • Theresa May
  • Katie Hopkins
  • Piers Morgan
  • Kim Jong-Un
  • Jeremy Hunt

Winner: Piers Morgan

All worthy villains. The ceremony was on February 13th this year.

Edited 12 June 2018 – fix to tense in final sentence.