Bizarre search engine terms – 2016 edition

About once a year, I like to take a look at the search engine terms that have brought people to this site, including the many that make me chuckle. Here are some recent highlights:

james blake elbow arctic monkeys pulp m people badly drawn boy

Are indeed all artists that have been mentioned previously on this blog. See here, here, here, here, here, and here.

henry jackman mr selfridge

IMDB is probably your best place for queries like this, and “no, he wasn’t,” is probably the answer to your question.

davina mccall breast british male award

I’ve looked again, and I don’t think Davina McCall has ever presented the Breast British Male Award at the BRITs, although she did present the entire ceremony in 2000 and 2003.

what is the trevor howard movie used in the robson green video of unchained melody

Inexplicably, my tag for Wham! comes first on Google when you search for this. The short answer, I’m afraid, is that I’ve no idea, but again IMDB might be a good place to start searching.

terence trent d’arby paula yates affair / paul..yates had affair with tereence trent derby

It’s a rumour that seems to pop up all over the internet, but it isn’t honestly something I could care less about. You can learn more about Terence here, and Paula here, and they did turn up together on the first B.E.F. album, reviewed here.

cloud nothings

It’s impressive that I would turn up on your search results, as I’ve only mentioned them once, and even then only in passing. Try their official website instead.

“divine fits”

See above! Their website is here.

everyone using autotune

I don’t have a list unfortunately, but you can read my thoughts on the subject here, and you can also learn how to get rid of the autotune effect but leave it on here.

rachel riley cribs

When I started researching this, I was thinking that I don’t think she has ever been on Cribs – she would certainly be an unlikely candidate. But then I discovered I have written about her before, when she presented the Q Spirit of Independence award to The Cribs in 2012. So there’s your answer!

erasure split up

Definitely not – you can read about their latest album The Violet Flame here.

If you want to see more, here are the 2015, 2014, and 2013 editions.

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The BPI Awards 1988

On February 8th 1988, Noel Edmonds once again presented the BPI Awards (the last show by that name) at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Apparently TV viewers didn’t get to see Rick Astley collecting his awards, which must have been a very great shame indeed.

This post is part of a series about the history of the BRIT Awards. You can read about the 1987 ceremony here, and the 1989 ceremony here.

Best British Album

Nominees:

  • George Michael – Faith
  • Pet Shop Boys – Actually
  • Sting – Nothing Like the Sun
  • Swing Out Sisters – It’s Better to Travel
  • T’Pau – Bridge of Spies

Winner: Sting

Best British Female

Presented by Chris de Burgh. Nominees:

  • Kate Bush
  • Samantha Fox
  • Alison Moyet
  • Sinitta
  • Kim Wilde

Winner: Alison Moyet

Best British Group

Presented by Eddy Grant. Nominees:

  • The Bee Gees
  • Def Leppard
  • Level 42
  • Pet Shop Boys
  • Whitesnake

Winner: Pet Shop Boys

Best British Male

Nominees:

  • Rick Astley
  • George Michael
  • Chris Rea
  • Cliff Richard
  • Steve Winwood

Winner: George Michael

Best British Newcomer

Voted for by listeners of BBC Radio 1 and readers of Radio Times. Presented by Mike Smith. First round nominees:

  • Rick Astley
  • Black
  • The Christians
  • Curiosity Killed the Cat
  • Johnny Hates Jazz
  • Living in a Box
  • Mel and Kim
  • Pepsi and Shirlie
  • The Proclaimers
  • Swing Out Sisters
  • T’Pau
  • Wet Wet Wet

Second round nominees:

  • Rick Astley
  • The Christians
  • Johnny Hates Jazz
  • T’Pau
  • Wet Wet Wet

Winner: Wet Wet Wet

Best British Producer

Presented by Trevor Horn. Nominees:

  • Brian Eno
  • Julian Mendelsohn
  • Paul O’Duffy
  • Stock, Aitken and Waterman
  • Alan Tarney

Winner: Stock, Aitken and Waterman

Best British Single

Nominees:

  • Rick Astley – Never Gonna Give You Up
  • Bananarama – Love in the First Degree
  • MARRS – Pump Up the Volume
  • Pet Shop Boys – It’s a Sin
  • T’Pau – China in Your Hands

Winner: Rick Astley

Best British Video

Presented by Gary Davies.

Winner: New Order – True Faith

Best Classical Recording

Presented by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Nominees:

  • Andrew Davies – The Mask of Time – Tippet
  • Vernon Handley – Symphony No 5 – Vaughan
  • Roger Norrington – Symphonies 2 and 8
  • Simon Rattle – Symphony No 2 – Mahler
  • Bryden Thomson – Piano Concertos 1 and 2

Winner: Vernon Handley

Best International Group

Presented by Paul Young. Nominees:

  • Bon Jovi
  • Fleetwood Mac
  • Heart
  • Los Lobos
  • U2

Winner: U2

Best International Newcomer

Presented by Wayne Mailloux. Nominees:

  • Beastie Boys
  • Terence Trent D’Arby
  • LL Cool J
  • Los Lobos
  • Bruce Willis

Winner: Terence Trent D’Arby

Best International Solo Artist

Nominees:

  • Whitney Houston
  • Madonna
  • Michael Jackson
  • Prince
  • Luther Vandross

Winner: Michael Jackson

Best Soundtrack / Cast Recording

Presented by The Bee Gees. Nominees:

  • Los Lobos / Various Artists – La Bamba
  • Original Cast Recording – Follies
  • Original Cast Recording – Les Miserables
  • Original Cast Recording – Phantom of the Opera
  • Various Artists – Dirty Dancing

Winner: Phantom of the Opera

Outstanding Contribution

Winner: The Who

Performances

Further Reading / Viewing

B.E.F. – 1981-2011

It seems strange writing a review of something that in some cases is thirty years old, but this is a fully remastered reissue, and that’s how it has earned its place on these pages. Also, B.E.F., or the British Electric Foundation are back now with their third collection, which seems a good time to look back at what they did previously.

For the uninintiated, B.E.F. are pretty much the same people as Heaven 17, a side-project which came about around the time that The Human League imploded in 1980. They’re also responsible for the name of this very blog Music for stowaways, for reasons which are unlikely to ever become clear.

The beautiful box set 1981-2011 is pretty comprehensive, bringing together almost all of their output from the thirty year period. You get three CDs – Music of Quality and Distinction: Volume 1Music of Quality and Distinction: Volume 2; and a collection of oddities entitled Music from Stowaways to Dark.

The first disc consists of the original Music of Quality and Distinction: Volume 1 album (1981) and some bonus rarities. It opens with Ball of Confusion featuring Tina Turner. Apparently, the only safe place to live is on an Indian reservation. It’s one of the better tracks on the album, although I’m not the world’s biggest Tina Turner fan, and as with much of Heaven 17‘s work it hasn’t aged especially well.

The original Music of Quality and Distinction is an album which I’d probably consider important rather than actually good, and this is highlighted by some of its less enjoyable moments, such as Billy Mackenzie wailing all over the place on The Secret Life of Arabia and then again at the end on It’s Over, and Paula Yates making a total mess of the frankly awful These Boots Are Made for Walking.

The less dreadful moments are generally listenable, such as Paul Jones‘s version of There’s a Ghost in My House, although the sound is distinctly odd – I’ve not heard the un-remastered version, but listening to this version I don’t even want to think about how the previous CD releases must have sounded.

Spectacularly vomit-inducing is Gary Glitter‘s appearance on Suspicious Minds. Obviously we can’t just wipe him from history, but it is hard to listen to this without wandering how much money he’s just made from your purchase of the album. On the plus side, it’s largely unlistenable.

Side B of the original album sees a general upturn in quality, with Bernie Nolan‘s take of You Keep Me Hanging On and Sandie Shaw‘s pleasant version of Anyone Who Had a Heart. The high-points of the album, though, are both of Glenn Gregory‘s tracks. By the time this came out, he had already appeared as the vocalist on Heaven 17‘s debut album Penthouse and Pavement, and they were clearly rather more comfortable recording with him than with any of his contemporaries.

Wichita Lineman is a pleasant electronic-soul take on the original, with backing not unlike the Music for Stowaways cassette which had appeared the previous year, and Perfect Day, which must by law be included on all cover version albums, is a great version of a great song. The first volume is then closed out by seven “backing tracks” (largely instrumental versions, occasionally with a few changes here and there), which are often better than the originals without the intervention of the less good vocalists.

Having worked through all of that, the second volume of Music of Quality and Distinction is rather more of a pleasure to listen to. B.E.F. returned nearly ten years later in 1991 with Volume 2, which is this time tempered by the sounds of the early 90s, as you might expect. It opens with the brilliant Chaka Khan on an atmospheric take of Someday We’ll All Be Free, and this is smoothly followed by Lalah Hathaway performing Family Affair. The best track on Side A is Early on the Morning, performed by Richard Darbyshire, and this is followed by the distinctly better return of Billy Mackenzie for Free.

The second volume is not without its low points. It’s Alright Ma, I’m Only Bleeding may have effectively launched the career of Terence Trent d’Arby, but it’s not great, and neither are A Song for You by Mavis Staples or Billy Preston‘s Try a Little Tenderness.

But for the most part, this is a pretty good album. In particular the moment halfway through I Don’t Know Why I Love You (vocals by Green Gartside) where it morphs into The Robots by Kraftwerk is pretty masterful. Tina Turner‘s return for A Change is Gonna Come is good too, as is Ghida de Palma‘s version of Feel Like Makin’ Love. The final track, Billy Preston‘s version of In My Life, is another of the best tracks on the album.

The bonus tracks for this album are equally pointless – you get a couple of acapella versions, an instrumental, an alternative version, and a version of I Don’t Know Why I Love You with a bit less of the electro middle eight. But in general the second volume is very strong.

The same cannot really be said for the third. Curiously titled Music from Stowaways to Dark, it essentially brings together the tracks from their early Music for Stowaways cassette with a couple of early demos from Volume 2 and the then-forthcoming Volume 3.

Unfortunately, much as I love the title and concept, the original Music for Stowaways is, frankly, pretty awful. Highlights are Wipe the Board Clean and The Old at Rest, as well as Honeymoon in New York which wasn’t on the cassette version, but the openers Optimum Chant and Uptown Apocalypse are dreadful, as is Rise of the EastGroove Thang, an alternative version of (We Don’t Need This) Fascist from Penthouse and Pavement, frankly just makes a mockery of the whole thing.

In fact, I’d possibly go as far as to say that the only good track on the album is the B.E.F. Ident which closes it. But then you get the three Work-in-Progress mixes which close the album – two apparently unfinished 1992 tracks, and one from the forthcoming album.

First up is Trade Winds, with a vocal by Mavis Staples, which is entirely pleasant, as is Co-Pilot to Pilot by Kelly Barnes, even if it does contain the word(s) “fiddle-dee-dee”, and the latter seems to have made such an impression on the artists that it now appears on the third full album Dark. Finally, you get an early version of Smalltown Boy starring Billie Godfrey, which is suitably excellent, and the box set is finally over.

Grab the CD or download version of the box set from Amazon if you’re in the UK or your local retailers if that’s where you’re at.

Five More Fascinating BRIT Awards Facts

Well you’ll have seen the ceremony by now of course, so here are some more of my “fascinating” facts…

Recognising the “Rest of the World”

Apart from one award in 1983, the BRITs didn’t fully separate Britain from the rest of the world until 1986, when Huey Lewis & the News received the first Best International Artist award. In 1989, Michael Jackson and Tracy Chapman were named the first Best International Solo Artists, but then in 1990, 1992, and 1993, there was only space for one combined Best International Solo Artist award, won by Neneh CherryPrince, and Prince respectively.

The International Breakthrough Artist (or Best International Newcomer) first turned up in 1988, and was won by Terence Trent D’Arby. The Best International Album award didn’t arrive until 2002, and the first winner was Kylie Minogue for Fever, although Michael Jackson had already won the Best Album award for Thriller in 1984.

BRIT Awards Luvvies

Some people just seem to walk the awards, and get nominated almost annually for the same award. Some of them even seem to win it annually. Here’s a quick selection:

  • Robbie Williams – won British Male Solo Artist in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2003, as well as a whole heap of other stuff and nominations in the same category in 1998, 2006, and 2010. Phil Collins had been his predecessor for that award, winning in 1986, 1989, and 1990 with further nominations in 1992 and 1993.
  • Annie Lennox – astoundingly, won British Female Solo Artist in 1984, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, and 1996, plus a nomination in 2004, making her the most successful artist to win any single award. Lisa Stansfield (one win in 1991 but nominations in 1992, 1993, 1995, and 1998) and Alison Moyet (wins in 1985 and 1988) also tried to topple her crown but failed. PJ Harvey tried her hardest with nominations in 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005, and 2008, but failed to win any of them.
  • Jamiroquai – managed a Best Dance Act nomination 6 out of the 11 times it was awarded despite not even really being a dance act.
  • Robbie Williams again – won Best British Single with Take That in 1993, 1994, and 1996, and then solo in 1999, 2000, and 2001. And then again with Take That in 2007 and 2008, giving him a shelf full of eight awards in this category. He also got a good set of Best Video awards to go on the shelf below.
  • You might think there would be enough International Male Solo Artists for a bit of variety, but apparently not. Prince won in 1992, 1993, 1995, and 1996 (the last time as The Artist Formerly Known As Prince, and then he was nominated as The Artist in 1997 before he ran out of silly names). Then Beck took over, winning in 1997, 1999, and 2000 and being nominated in 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, and 2009. Eminem won in 2001, 2003, and 2005, with two further nominations. Most recently, Kanye West won in 2006, 2008, and 2009. In the International Female Solo Artist category, things are nearly as repetitive, with multiple wins for BjörkKylie MinogueMadonna, and RihannaAlicia Keys has taken six nominations but no wins as yet.
  • U2 – won International Group in 1988, 1989, 1990, 1998, and 2001, with further nominations basically every year: 1992, 1993, 1994, 2005, and 2006. While they were taking a break, R.E.M. stepped in in 1992, 1993, and 1995 plus nominations in 1997, 1999, and 2000, before being replaced by Foo Fighters for 2008 and 2012 after unsuccessful nominations in 1996 and 2003.
  • Finally, the Outstanding Contribution is normally pretty free of repetition, right? Nope. The Beatles shared the award in 1977. Then John Lennon grabbed it posthumously in 1982. Then they came back again for it as a group in 1983. George Martin got it in 1984. Finally, Paul McCartney broke two decades of silence by grabbing it in 2008. The other people who think it’s OK to take it home more than once are Elton John and Queen.

Best Soundtrack or Original Cast Recording

It’s a bit of a shame that this award hasn’t been given since 2001. For sixteen years, it was handed out to the likes of Top GunPhantom of the OperaBatman (in 1990 and 1996), Twin PeaksTrainspotting, and American Beauty.

But soundtracks are a key part of music, so I think it is a shame that they don’t do this one any more…

Back from the Dead

From 1990 to 1998, there was a Best Producer award. Then from 1999 to 2010, there wasn’t. But now it’s back, and rightfully so. Previous winners include Dave Stewart out of EurythmicsTrevor HornPeter GabrielBrian Eno (twice), Nellee Hooper, and Youth.

The people behind the music generally remain forgotten by the BRITs. The first ever Outstanding Contribution award in 1977 was shared between The Beatles and EMI boss LG Wood. In 2011 Tony Visconti was given a rare special award for Innovation in Production. But the biggest surprise for me was the same year, and was largely forgotten about by the mainstream media, maybe because they didn’t know who he was. But the Outstanding Contribution award in 2011 was quite rightly given to Daniel Miller.

Also back from the dead is the Best Live Act award, won by U2 in 1993, Spice Girls (as Best Selling British Live Act) in 2000, and then MuseKaiser ChiefsMuse again, Take That, and Iron Maiden from 2005 to 2009, before inexplicably being axed again just as live music exploded in popularity.

Special Awards and Long Forgotten Awards

Occasionally, the BRITs decide to give an award to somebody just because they want to. Some of them are for charity deeds, or just generally for selling pretty well. Here’s a summary:

  • 1994 – Special Sales Award – Meat Loaf
  • 1996 – Freddie Mercury Award – Help! Project
  • 1996 – Artist of a Generation – Michael Jackson
  • 1998 – Freddie Mercury Award – Elton John
  • 1999 – Freddie Mercury Award – Jubilee 2000
  • 2005 – BRITs 25 – The Best Song Award – Robbie Williams – Angels
  • 2010 – BRITs Hits 30 – Spice Girls – Wannabe / Who Do You Think You Are
  • 2010 – BRITs Album of 30 Years – Oasis(What’s the Story) Morning Glory
  • 2011 – Innovation in Production – Tony Visconti

But to me a really fascinating moment was when I discovered by accident that there had once been a Best Comedy Recording award at the BRITs. I’m still not clear how long it went on for, or who most of the winners were, as it was largely undocumented, but I’d love to see that one come back.

Awards Week will continue tomorrow with something else that I make up on the spot.

Incidentally, apologies about some of the missing videos on recent posts – the BRITs official website got remodelled after I’d written the pieces, and some of the YouTube ones got removed. Never mind…

Edit: this post originally said the first international award was in 1986 – in fact there was one in 1983.

The BRIT Awards 1989

Oh yes, 1989. The single most important year in the history of the BRITs. Broadcast live from London’s Royal Albert Hall, it’s the pop music event of the year. Samantha Fox and Mick Fleetwood famously presented for the first year that it was even called the BRIT Awards.

If you think that pairing a miniature Page Three model with an enormous Fleetwood Mac baldy might be a bad idea, you have little idea of the shambles which would follow. So disastrous was it, that the event wouldn’t be broadcast live for another decade. But on the plus side, we can watch the whole thing thanks to YouTube. So let’s sit back and enjoy the event of a lifetime in full. Part 1:

The show opens relatively poorly with Gloria Estefan, before the bizarrely paired hosts stumble on stage, eventually find their way to the microphones, and stumble their way through the show introduction.

Best British Single

Phil Collins arrives to put the hosts out of their misery, but disappointingly fails to kill either of them. Julian Lennon, although announced by the hosts, does not. Nominees:

  • Deacon Blue – Real Gone Kid
  • Fairground Attraction – Perfect
  • Robert Palmer – She Makes My Day
  • Tanita Tikaram – Twist In My Sobriety
  • Tom Jones & Art of Noise – Kiss

Cue some embarrassed filling by the hosts while the winners try to find the stage.

Winner: Fairground Attraction.

Best British Group

Presented by the fabulous The Fo… the wonderful The Four… the brilliant The Four Tops. Oh, it’s Boy George. Nominees:

  • Christians
  • Def Leppard
  • Erasure
  • Pet Shop Boys
  • Wet Wet Wet

Winner: Erasure.

Best International Male Solo Artist

This time, with a bit of culture (you know, because he was in Culture Club) it’s Boy Geo… oh, OK, The Four Tops. Nominees:

  • Alexander O’Neal
  • Luther Vandross
  • Michael Jackson
  • Prince
  • Terence Trent D’Arby

A clean sweep for… why on earth did he feel it necessary to bring race into it? The Four Tops steal the award, claiming they’ll pass it onto the winner “at some point”.

Winner: Michael Jackson.

At which point Fairground Attraction start doing bird impressions.

Best International Female

In possibly the worst introduction yet, we learn that Madonna has been busy glorying in her bask. Presented by Michael Hutchence and John Farris out of INXS. Nominees:

  • Anita Baker
  • Enya
  • Kylie Minogue
  • Tracy Chapman
  • Whitney Houston

Winner: Tracy Chapman.

Best British Album

Presented by Carol Decker and Mike Rutherford. Nominees:

  • Aztec Camera – Love
  • Fairground Attraction – First of a Million Kisses
  • Pet Shop Boys – Introspective
  • Steve Winwood – Roll With It
  • The Pasadenas – To Whom It May Concern

Winner: Fairground Attraction.

Best International Group

Whose turn is it? Um… no idea, let’s just fade the hosts out. Presented by Kevin Godley and Lol Creme out of 10cc. Nominees:

  • Bon Jovi
  • Fleetwood Mac
  • INXS
  • U2
  • Womack & Womack

Winner: U2.

Next up, Yazz, who sat on top of the chart for five weeks. Which must have been uncomfortable. Then Mark Knopfler and Alan Price bang on about the BRITs School for a bit.

Best British Newcomer

In an interesting move designed to completely outfox (ha!) the presenters, Ronnie Wood and Bill Wyman turn up with a mystery third person, without having shown us a list of “possibilities”. So the only nominee we know about is:

  • Bros

What a dreadful acceptance speech. Thanks Mum.

Winner: Bros.

Best International Newcomer

Presented by Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox out of Eurythmics, who seem to have locked the winner in a studio. Nominees:

  • Belinda Carlisle
  • Enya
  • Michelle Shocked
  • Salt ‘n’ Pepa
  • Tracy Chapman

Winner: Tracy Chapman.

Def Leppard turn up for some heavy, heavy metal. And massive perms.

Best Classical Recording

Presented by Courtney Pine and Mica Paris. Nominees:

  • Andre Previn – Violin & Viola Concertos: Walton
  • Jeffrey Tate – Opera Arias – Mozart – Kiri te Kanawa
  • Phillip Brunelle – Paul Bunyan – Britten
  • Simon Rattle – Symphony No 2 – Mahler
  • Trevor Pinnock – Messiah – Handel

Handel has been totally up there for loads of years.

Winner: Trevor Pinnock.

Best Soundtrack/Cast Recording

If we’re not careful then the whole show might grind to an abysmal and moody halt. Which would leave everyone feeling very pleased, probably. Presented by Justin Hayward, someone else out of The Moody Blues, and Belinda Carlisle.

  • Buster (various artists)
  • Good Morning Vietnam (various artists)
  • Hairspray (various artists)
  • Rattle and Hum (U2)
  • The Princess Bride (Mark Knopfler)

Winner: Buster, accepted by Phil Collins and The Four Tops.

Tanita Tikaram then performs in a suit.

Best Music Video

Voted for by viewers of Going Live on BBC1, and presented by Jools Holland, outshouted by Ken Russell. Nominees:

  • Bananarama – Nathan Jones
  • George Harrison – When We Was Fab
  • Michael Jackson – Smooth Criminal
  • The Christians – Harvest for the World
  • Wet Wet Wet – Temptation

Winner: Michael Jackson.

Best British Male Solo Artist

By this stage we’ve pretty much settled into a pretty dreadful style. Presented by Joan Armatrading and Joe Elliott. Nominees:

  • Chris Rea
  • George Michael
  • Phil Collins
  • Robert Palmer
  • Steve Winwood

Winner: Phil Collins.

Best British Female Solo Artist

Presented by Tina Turner, complete with the kind of sexist introduction that you’ve never seen in any tabloid newspaper. Nominees:

  • Annie Lennox
  • Mica Paris
  • Sade
  • Tanita Tikaram
  • Yazz

Winner: Annie Lennox.

Bros follow with a lot of jumping around.

Outstanding Contribution

Presented by the chairman of the BPI Peter Jamieson, who should really have been hanging his head in shame by this stage.

Winner: Cliff Richard. After an appallingly pseudo-religious speech, Cliff deservedly leaves the stage to almost total silence.

Which artist could be singled out to close a show like this? I think we’d agree, no one. Mark Knopfler, Randy Newman and the BRITs Supergroup close the show with a song which even the performers don’t even seem to be enjoying, and finally the thing comes to an end.

Performances

  • Bros – I Owe You Nothing
  • Def Leppard – Pour Some Sugar On Me
  • Fairground Attraction – Perfect
  • Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine – Rhythm Is Gonna Get You
  • Mark Knopfler, Randy Newman and the BRITs Supergroup – Falling in Love
  • Tanita Tikaram – Good Tradition
  • Yazz – Got to Share

Further Reading / Viewing

The BRIT Awards 1994

The fourteenth BRIT Awards, on the fourteenth of February 1994, were something of a turning point for the BRITs. After corporate suits, total unmitigated chaos, and The 1980s, they had been through a number of incarnations, but somehow in 1994 the BRITs came of age. Since then, it has been essential annual viewing (or avoiding) for any fan of music.

In 1994, they were presented by Elton John and RuPaul, and took place at Alexandra Palace, in London.

Best British Newcomer

Presented by Tori Amos. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Gabrielle
  • Jamiroquai
  • Shara Nelson
  • Suede

Winner: Gabrielle.

Best International Newcomer

Presented by Kylie Minogue. Nominees:

  • 4 Non Blondes
  • Björk
  • Rage Against the Machine
  • Spin Doctors
  • SWV

Winner: Björk.

Best British Dance Act

Presented by Seal. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Jamiroquai
  • M People
  • Stereo MCs
  • The Shamen

Winner: M People.

Best Soundtrack/Cast Recording

Presented by Rozalla. Nominees:

  • Reservoir Dogs (various artists)
  • Sleepless in Seattle (various artists)
  • The Bodyguard (Whitney Houston / various artists)
  • The Jungle Book (various artists)
  • Whats Love Got To Do With It (Tina Turner)

Winner: The Bodyguard, accepted by Whitney Houston.

Best International Female Solo Artist

Presented by ze Jean-Paul Gauthier. Ze nominees:

  • Björk
  • Janet Jackson
  • Mariah Carey
  • Nanci Griffith
  • Tina Turner

Longeur vidéo ere.

Winner: Björk.

Best International Group

Presented by Kiki Dee. Nominees:

  • Crowded House
  • Nirvana
  • Pearl Jam
  • Spin Doctors
  • U2

Winner: Crowded House.

Best Selling Single and Album of 1993

Video here. Look at the size of his mouth!

Winner: Meat Loaf.

Best British Producer

Nominees:

  • Brian Eno
  • Flood
  • M People
  • Nellee Hooper
  • Youth

Winner: Brian Eno.

Best Music Video

Voted for by viewers of MTV Europe, and presented by Pip Dann. Nominees:

  • Gabrielle – Dreams
  • Jamiroquai – Too Young To Die
  • New Order – Regret
  • Peter Gabriel – Steam
  • Suede – Animal Nitrate

Shortlist:

  • Take That – Pray
  • Pet Shop Boys – Go West
  • Depeche Mode – I Feel You
  • David Bowie – Jump They Say
  • Sting – Fields of Gold

Winner: Take That.

Best International Male Solo Artist

Presented by Vivienne Westwood. Nominees:

  • Billy Joel
  • Lenny Kravitz
  • Meat Loaf
  • Neil Young
  • Terence Trent D’Arby

Winner: Lenny Kravitz.

Best British Single

Voted for by listeners of BBC Radio 1, and presented by Steve Wright. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian – Boom Shak-A-Lak
  • Dina Carroll – Don’t Be a Stranger
  • Gabrielle – Dreams
  • M People – Moving On Up
  • New Order – Regret
  • Paul Weller – Wild Wood
  • Radiohead – Creep
  • Shaggy – Oh Carolina
  • Suede – Animal Nitrate
  • Take That – Pray

Winner: Take That.

Best British Album

Presented by Jack Dee. Nominees:

  • Dina Carroll – So Close
  • Jamiroquai – Emergency on Planet Earth
  • Stereo MCs – Connected
  • Sting – Ten Summoners Tales
  • Suede – Suede

Winner: Stereo MCs.

Best British Female Solo Artist

Presented by Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora. Nominees:

  • Beverley Craven
  • Dina Carroll
  • Gabrielle
  • PJ Harvey
  • Shara Nelson

Winner: Dina Carroll.

Best British Male Solo Artist

Presented by Neneh Cherry. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Paul Weller
  • Rod Stewart
  • Sting
  • Van Morrison

Winner: Sting.

Best British Group

Presented by Paula Yates. Nominees:

  • Jamiroquai
  • M People
  • Stereo MCs
  • Suede
  • Take That

Winner: Stereo MCs.

Outstanding Contribution

Presented by John McCarthy and Jill Morrell.

Winner: Van Morrison.

Performances

Further Reading / Viewing

Edit: removed numerous videos that are no longer available (13 August 2017).

John Peel’s Record Collection

Browsing through someone else’s record collection is always very rewarding. You learn so much about the owner!

Although I’m sure none of us really needed to learn much about John Peel‘s beautifully eclectic tastes. If there’s anyone who didn’t worship him as a living God when he was around, then I’d be fascinated to know why. And if there’s a music fan out there who doesn’t know where they were then they found out he’d sadly died, then I’d be very surprised.

If you are the one person on the planet who wasn’t aware, then he was probably the finest DJ in British radio history. After some time in the world of piracy in the mid 1960s, he joined fledgeling BBC pop station Radio 1 when it started in 1967 and stayed there right up until his death in 2004. He was responsible for starting the careers of so many big name bands that it’s not even worth considering listing them, and his Peel Sessions remain a household name worldwide.

And this year, 45 years after he joined Radio 1, his estate have been working on a wonderful project to digitise his record collection, and they finally reach the end of the alphabet this week. Starting initially with the first hundred records from each letter, the archive of a few thousand records is quite compelling. Check it out here.

I’m sure I’ve missed plenty, but here are a few of the things which have caught my eye in his collection on my quick browse. Obviously I’m a lot less open minded than he is, but then neither was I going to list all 2,600 entries here! I’ve copied their links where appropriate, but I’d strongly recommend that you go and browse them for yourself!

In particular, the brilliantly bizarre industrial Slovenes Laibach get a full interview in the L is for Laibach feature here, which is well worth watching.