Music for the Masses 39 – 7 May 2005

For the final run of Music for the Masses, from April to May 2005, I had secured the coveted Saturday night slot, building people up to a stomping night out in Leeds. Or alternatively helping them to revise for their exams. Or potentially neither; it was rather difficult to tell. But looking through the playlist, I can see a slightly more uptempo seam running through the show, culminating with the Electromix at the end of the show.

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Show 39: Sat 7 May 2005, from 6:00pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: The Shamen.

  • Morcheeba – World Looking In
  • Erasure – Here I Go Impossible Again
  • 1 Giant Leap feat. Robbie Williams & Maxi Jazz – My Culture
  • Mylo – In My Arms (Sharam Jey Remix)
  • The Shamen – Comin’ On (Beatmasters Mix)
  • Sylver – Make It
  • Aurora – Ordinary World
  • BT – Orbitus Terrarium
  • Kraftwerk – Aérodynamik
  • The Shamen – MK2A
  • Depeche Mode – Freelove (Live) [The Live Bit]
  • Stereo MCs – Connected
  • Technique – Sun is Shining
  • Felix – Don’t You Want Me
  • Yello feat. Stina Nordenstam – To the Sea
  • New Order – Jetstream (Arthur Baker Remix)
  • The Shamen – Indica
  • Binar – The Truth Sets Us Free
  • Talk Talk – Talk Talk
  • Mirwais feat. Craig Wedren – Miss You [Electromix]
  • Elektric Music – Lifestyle (Radio-Style) [Electromix]
  • Front Line Assembly – Everything Must Perish [Electromix]
  • Fluke – Absurd
  • Bent – The Waters Deep

The Electromix feature from this show still exists, and will be included on a future Playlist for stowaways.

Claudia Brücken – The Lost Are Found

Part of the reason for keeping this blog running for so long is that it has helped me find out about new music, where otherwise it might have just passed me by. Claudia Brücken‘s last album The Lost Are Found is a perfect example of this – I simply never would have known about it if I hadn’t chanced upon it earlier this year, while writing another piece.

Brücken has a slightly bizarre, illustrious career, which we examined in more detail a year or so ago when reviewing the brilliant Combined compilation. On this latest album, she has expanded on the brilliant Thank You by working again with producer/genius Stephen Hague to record an entire album. Curiously, it’s also a cover versions album, and it includes some very odd choices – some good; others not so special – but all interesting.

It opens with The Mysteries of Love, written by David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti for the Blue Velvet soundtrack, and originally performed by Julee Cruise. Without Cruise’s haunting vocal style it’s perhaps not the strongest opener ever, but it’s a pleasant enough track. Next up is Memories of a Color, packed with bizarre pad sounds. The original was Swedish singer Stina Nordenstam‘s debut single in 1992, and on this album it helps to build a pleasant mood which prevails throughout the entire release.

The Day I See You Again was originally performed by Dubstar back in 1995, and curiously although much of that album was produced by Stephen Hague, this track was not. Although not tremendously different from the original, it’s still an extremely good song, and the duo of Brücken and Hague do it justice.

The single Everyone Says “Hi” was a David Bowie original, curiously not one of his oldies, taken instead from his 2002 album Heathen. On this album it makes for a great pop track, and is definitely one of the highlights of the whole collection.

One Summer Dream, written by Jeff Lynne, feels a little out of place in the middle of the album with its acoustic backing. The original closed ELO‘s 1975 album Face the Music, and it’s tempting to wonder if it worked rather better in that context – it still sounds good, but it’s not as beautiful as it perhaps ought to be.

Crime is another Stina Nordenstam song, originally from her 1994 second album And She Closed Her Eyes. As with The Mysteries of Love, it’s nice, but not entirely mindblowing. Perhaps even with a legend of the calibre of Brücken it pays to lower your expectations a little. Then The Road to Happiness was written by Stephen “TinTin” Duffy for The Lilac Time‘s eponymous 1987 debut, and is a surprising highlight of the album. There’s something very special about the uplifting chorus, as it comes together with the almost accordian-flavoured backing.

Next up is Kings Cross, which as I’m sure we all know is a Pet Shop Boys original, a haunting track from their essential 1988 album Actually, also covered a couple of years ago by Tracey Thorn. Curiously, this one was originally produced by Stephen Hague, and so it’s interesting to hear what he does with it this time around. Although the song is just as powerful as ever, I think it perhaps lacks something from the original – but not a lot. It’s definitely one of the highlights of this release as well.

No One to Blame is a new track, written for the album by a duo called The Burt Brothers. It’s a good fit, and the flanged piano backing suits the semi-electronic mood of the album very well. And the Sun Will Shine is a Bee Gees original, from their 1968 album Horizontal. Stripped of their unique vocal style, it’s still a strong song with the typical soaring backing that seems to echo through their back catalogue. It sounds a little inconsequential at times, but it’s a typically good song.

Then the closing track is Whispering Pines, originally performed by The Band on their 1969 eponymous second album. Although it’s a nice enough song, by this stage it’s starting to sound a bit samey – it would be nice to have a bit of Hammond Organ or something to liven things up. It’s closing a good album – but not an amazing one unfortunately.

The Lost Are Found is, ultimately, perhaps a little underwhelming, but that’s only because of the sheer weight of the names behind it. Produced by Stephen Hague, one of the most important producers of electronic music in the 1980s and 1990s. Performed by Claudia Brücken, one of the best-kept secrets of electronic music throughout its history. And written by an astonishing list of songwriters. It really ought to be breathtaking, and it is pretty good, but there just seems to be something lacking. It’s still worth hearing though – the four or five exceptional tracks more than make up for its failings.

You can find The Lost Are Found through all standard music retailers, such as Amazon.