Music for the Masses 39 – 7 May 2005

For the final run of Music for the Masses, from April to May 2005, I had secured the coveted Saturday night slot, building people up to a stomping night out in Leeds. Or alternatively helping them to revise for their exams. Or potentially neither; it was rather difficult to tell. But looking through the playlist, I can see a slightly more uptempo seam running through the show, culminating with the Electromix at the end of the show.

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Show 39: Sat 7 May 2005, from 6:00pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: The Shamen.

  • Morcheeba – World Looking In
  • Erasure – Here I Go Impossible Again
  • 1 Giant Leap feat. Robbie Williams & Maxi Jazz – My Culture
  • Mylo – In My Arms (Sharam Jey Remix)
  • The Shamen – Comin’ On (Beatmasters Mix)
  • Sylver – Make It
  • Aurora – Ordinary World
  • BT – Orbitus Terrarium
  • Kraftwerk – Aérodynamik
  • The Shamen – MK2A
  • Depeche Mode – Freelove (Live) [The Live Bit]
  • Stereo MCs – Connected
  • Technique – Sun is Shining
  • Felix – Don’t You Want Me
  • Yello feat. Stina Nordenstam – To the Sea
  • New Order – Jetstream (Arthur Baker Remix)
  • The Shamen – Indica
  • Binar – The Truth Sets Us Free
  • Talk Talk – Talk Talk
  • Mirwais feat. Craig Wedren – Miss You [Electromix]
  • Elektric Music – Lifestyle (Radio-Style) [Electromix]
  • Front Line Assembly – Everything Must Perish [Electromix]
  • Fluke – Absurd
  • Bent – The Waters Deep

The Electromix feature from this show still exists, and will be included on a future Playlist for stowaways.

Mercury Music Prize 1992-1994

The Mercury Music Prize launched in 1992, and has always stuck to its guns – in September, a list of the finest albums of the year will be nominated, and then in October a winner is announced. Simple as that. Despite some speculation in recent years that it may have lost its way somewhat, it’s still a good guide to what might be going on in the world of “real” music. Here’s a guide to what happened over its first three years…

Mercury Music Prize 1992

According to The Guardian, the award was devised by Jon Webster, the Managing Director at Virgin Records, who hoped it might become “the Booker Prize of the music industry”, independent of the music industry but with its endorsement. The panel is led by Professor Simon Frith, and chosen by the event’s organiser David Wilkinson.

The prize name, by the way, is purely from the event’s sponsor, the now largely defunct telecoms company Mercury. The first awards took place at The Savoy Hotel, 8th September 1992.

Nominees:

  • Barry Adamson – Soul Murder
  • Jah Wobble – Rising Above Bedlam
  • The Jesus and Mary Chain – Honey’s Dead
  • Bheki Mseleku – Celebration
  • Primal Scream – Screamadelica
  • Saint Etienne – Foxbase Alpha
  • Simply Red – Stars
  • John Tavener and Steven Isserlis – The Protecting Veil
  • U2 – Achtung Baby
  • Young Disciples – Road to Freedom

Winner: Primal Scream

Mercury Music Prize 1993

Nominees:

  • Apache Indian – No Reservations
  • The Auteurs – New Wave
  • Gavin Bryars – Jesus’ Blood Never Failed Me Yet
  • Dina Carroll – So Close
  • PJ Harvey – Rid of Me
  • New Order – Republic
  • Stereo MCs – Connected
  • Sting – Ten Summoner’s Tales
  • Suede – Suede
  • Stan Tracey – Portraits Plus

Winner: Suede

Mercury Music Prize 1994

The 1994 awards were controversial, as nobody actually seemed to like the winners very much. The Independent even suggested that they might have won due to positive discrimination. Took place on 13th September 1994.

Nominees:

  • Blur – Parklife
  • M People – Elegant Slumming
  • Ian McNabb – Head Like a Rock
  • Shara Nelson – What Silence Knows
  • Michael Nyman – The Piano Concerto / MGV
  • The Prodigy – Music for the Jilted Generation
  • Pulp – His ‘n’ Hers
  • Take That – Everything Changes
  • Therapy? – Troublegum
  • Paul Weller – Wild Wood

Winner: M People, although Paul Weller thought he should have won

Further information

Five Fascinating BRIT Awards Facts

The BRITs are coming! Tonight!

Here’s my compendium of fascinating BRIT Awards facts based on things I learnt while researching the previous BRITs posts…

The Sad Loss of the Best Video Award

For the last time in 2002, the Best Video award was given to So Solid Crew. With that following the previous three years’ consecutive wins by Robbie Williams for MillenniumShe’s the One and Rock DJ, it perhaps isn’t surprising that it was axed, but previous years had seen wins for Adamski‘s KillerMichael Jackson‘s Smooth CriminalNew Order‘s True Faith and Peter Gabriel‘s Sledgehammer.

The Second Biggest BRIT Award Failure of All Time

Poor Jamiroquai. Somebody must like them. Even so, it’s pretty astonishing that they have managed quite so many nominations without ever managing to win a BRIT. Here’s the full list of shame:

  • 1994 – Best British Group, won by Stereo MCs
  • 1994 – Best British Album for Emergency on Planet Earth, won by Stereo MCs
  • 1994 – Best Dance Act, won by M. People
  • 1994 – Best Video for Too Young to Die, won by Take That
  • 1994 – Best British Newcomer, won by Gabrielle
  • 1995 – Best Video for Return of the Space Cowboy, won by Blur
  • 1997 – Best Video for Virtual Insanity, won by Spice Girls
  • 1997 – Best Dance Act, won by The Prodigy
  • 1998 – Best Dance Act, won by The Prodigy
  • 1999 – Best Dance Act, won by Fatboy Slim
  • 1999 – Best Video for Deeper Underground, won by Robbie Williams
  • 2000 – Best Dance Act, won by The Chemical Brothers
  • 2002 – Best British Group, won by Travis
  • 2003 – Best Dance Act, won by Sugababes

Speaking personally, I don’t think there’s a single one of those that I don’t agree with! But believe it or not, there’s an even bigger failure to come.

Genre-Based Awards

Awards come and go at the BRITs. A lot of the less popular ones were specifically genre-based, and included:

  • Pop Act – awarded from 2000 to 2006 and won by FiveWestlife (twice), BlueBustedMcFly, and James Blunt. And then for some reason nobody else.
  • Dance Act – always a curious award, as Jamiroquai were nominated nearly every year but never won (see below). Awarded from 1994 to 2004 and won by M. People (twice), Massive AttackThe Prodigy (twice), Fatboy Slim (twice), The Chemical BrothersBasement Jaxx, and, as we saw above, erm… Sugababes. Some good winners, but no great loss really given how out of touch the awards committee really were.
  • Rock Act – awarded just three times between 2004 and 2006, and won by The DarknessFranz Ferdinand, and Kaiser Chiefs.
  • Urban Act – awarded four times between 2003 and 2006, and won by Ms DynamiteLemar (twice), and Joss Stone.

Speaking of which…

The Classical BRIT Awards

Until 1993, there was a strange quiet patch during the ceremony in which the pop star of the day attempted to pronounce classical composers and musicians with strange names. But Nigel Kennedy‘s Violin Concerto was the last winner of the Best Classical Recording award. Until 2000, when Sir Trevor McDonald turned up to present a ceremony all of their own.

The Biggest BRIT Award Failure of All Time

Even less successful than Jamiroquai, and infinitely more surprising, is the sorry tale of Radiohead. Nominated for no less than fifteen awards, they have somehow managed never to win a single thing at the BRITs. A conspiracy perhaps? Who knows – perhaps they have just been unlucky…

  • 1994 – Best British Single for Creep, won by Take That
  • 1996 – Best British Group, won by Oasis
  • 1996 – Best British Album for The Bends, won by Oasis
  • 1996 – Best Video for Just, won by, erm, Oasis
  • 1998 – Best British Group, won by The Verve
  • 1998 – Best British Album for OK Computer, won by The Verve
  • 1998 – Best British Single for Paranoid Album, won by All Saints
  • 1999 – Best Video for No Surprises, won by Robbie Williams
  • 2001 – Best British Group, won by Coldplay
  • 2001 – Best British Album for Kid A, won by Coldplay
  • 2002 – Best British Group, won by Travis
  • 2002 – Best British Album for Kid A, again. To add insult to injury, this time it was won by Dido
  • 2004 – Best British Group, won by The Darkness
  • 2009 – Best British Group, won by Elbow
  • 2009 – Best British Album for In Rainbows, won by Duffy

Well that’s all for now, but I might pick this up again later in the week. Enjoy the awards tonight!

The BRIT Awards 1994

The fourteenth BRIT Awards, on the fourteenth of February 1994, were something of a turning point for the BRITs. After corporate suits, total unmitigated chaos, and The 1980s, they had been through a number of incarnations, but somehow in 1994 the BRITs came of age. Since then, it has been essential annual viewing (or avoiding) for any fan of music.

In 1994, they were presented by Elton John and RuPaul, and took place at Alexandra Palace, in London.

Best British Newcomer

Presented by Tori Amos. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Gabrielle
  • Jamiroquai
  • Shara Nelson
  • Suede

Winner: Gabrielle.

Best International Newcomer

Presented by Kylie Minogue. Nominees:

  • 4 Non Blondes
  • Björk
  • Rage Against the Machine
  • Spin Doctors
  • SWV

Winner: Björk.

Best British Dance Act

Presented by Seal. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Jamiroquai
  • M People
  • Stereo MCs
  • The Shamen

Winner: M People.

Best Soundtrack/Cast Recording

Presented by Rozalla. Nominees:

  • Reservoir Dogs (various artists)
  • Sleepless in Seattle (various artists)
  • The Bodyguard (Whitney Houston / various artists)
  • The Jungle Book (various artists)
  • Whats Love Got To Do With It (Tina Turner)

Winner: The Bodyguard, accepted by Whitney Houston.

Best International Female Solo Artist

Presented by ze Jean-Paul Gauthier. Ze nominees:

  • Björk
  • Janet Jackson
  • Mariah Carey
  • Nanci Griffith
  • Tina Turner

Longeur vidéo ere.

Winner: Björk.

Best International Group

Presented by Kiki Dee. Nominees:

  • Crowded House
  • Nirvana
  • Pearl Jam
  • Spin Doctors
  • U2

Winner: Crowded House.

Best Selling Single and Album of 1993

Video here. Look at the size of his mouth!

Winner: Meat Loaf.

Best British Producer

Nominees:

  • Brian Eno
  • Flood
  • M People
  • Nellee Hooper
  • Youth

Winner: Brian Eno.

Best Music Video

Voted for by viewers of MTV Europe, and presented by Pip Dann. Nominees:

  • Gabrielle – Dreams
  • Jamiroquai – Too Young To Die
  • New Order – Regret
  • Peter Gabriel – Steam
  • Suede – Animal Nitrate

Shortlist:

  • Take That – Pray
  • Pet Shop Boys – Go West
  • Depeche Mode – I Feel You
  • David Bowie – Jump They Say
  • Sting – Fields of Gold

Winner: Take That.

Best International Male Solo Artist

Presented by Vivienne Westwood. Nominees:

  • Billy Joel
  • Lenny Kravitz
  • Meat Loaf
  • Neil Young
  • Terence Trent D’Arby

Winner: Lenny Kravitz.

Best British Single

Voted for by listeners of BBC Radio 1, and presented by Steve Wright. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian – Boom Shak-A-Lak
  • Dina Carroll – Don’t Be a Stranger
  • Gabrielle – Dreams
  • M People – Moving On Up
  • New Order – Regret
  • Paul Weller – Wild Wood
  • Radiohead – Creep
  • Shaggy – Oh Carolina
  • Suede – Animal Nitrate
  • Take That – Pray

Winner: Take That.

Best British Album

Presented by Jack Dee. Nominees:

  • Dina Carroll – So Close
  • Jamiroquai – Emergency on Planet Earth
  • Stereo MCs – Connected
  • Sting – Ten Summoners Tales
  • Suede – Suede

Winner: Stereo MCs.

Best British Female Solo Artist

Presented by Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora. Nominees:

  • Beverley Craven
  • Dina Carroll
  • Gabrielle
  • PJ Harvey
  • Shara Nelson

Winner: Dina Carroll.

Best British Male Solo Artist

Presented by Neneh Cherry. Nominees:

  • Apache Indian
  • Paul Weller
  • Rod Stewart
  • Sting
  • Van Morrison

Winner: Sting.

Best British Group

Presented by Paula Yates. Nominees:

  • Jamiroquai
  • M People
  • Stereo MCs
  • Suede
  • Take That

Winner: Stereo MCs.

Outstanding Contribution

Presented by John McCarthy and Jill Morrell.

Winner: Van Morrison.

Performances

Further Reading / Viewing

Edit: removed numerous videos that are no longer available (13 August 2017).