Ivor Novello Awards Winners 1956-2018 (Part Two)

Last week, we ran through the 63-year history of the Ivor Novello Awards, and listed all the winners in the Song and Album categories, and the special and one-off awards. Let’s finish that journey now, starting with the Artist Award categories.

Artist Awards

Outstanding Services to British Music

  • 1956 – Jack Payne
  • 1957 – A.P. Mantovani
  • 1958 – Ted Heath
  • 1959 – Billy Cotton
  • 1960 – Lionel Bart
  • 1961 – Eric Maschwitz
  • 1962 – Cliff Richard, Jet Harris, Hank Marvin, Tony Meehan and Bruce Welch
  • 1963 – Lawrence Wright
  • 1964 – Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr
  • 1965 – Paddy Roberts
  • 1966 – BBC TV (for the production of the series ‘A Song For Europe’)
  • 1967 – Joe Loss
  • 1968 – Alan Herbert
  • 1969 – Andrew Gold
  • 1970 – Noel Coward
  • 1971 – Cliff Richard
  • 1972 – Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1973 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1974 – Tolchard Evans
  • 1975 – Vera Lynn
  • 1976 – Dick James
  • 1977 – Adrian Boult
  • 1978 – Harry Mortimer
  • 1979 – George Martin
  • 1980 – Robert Mayer
  • 1981 – William Walton
  • 1982 – Lennox Berkeley
  • 1984 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1985 – Michael Tippett
  • 1986 – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1987 – Yehudi Menuhin
  • 1988 – David Heneker
  • 1989 – Paul McCartney
  • 1990 – Mick Avory, Dave Davies, Ray Davies, Ian Gibbons and Jim Rodford
  • 1991 – Robert Farnon
  • 1996 – Jeff Lynne

Songwriter of the Year

  • 1970 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1971 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1972 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1973 – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1974 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1975 – Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • 1976 – Wayne Bickerton and Tony Waddington
  • 1977 – Biddu
  • 1978 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1979 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1980 – Ben Findon
  • 1981 – Ben Findon
  • 1982 – Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni
  • 1983 – Andy Hill
  • 1984 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1985 – George Michael
  • 1986 – Roland Orzabal
  • 1987 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1988 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1989 – George Michael and Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman (presented jointly)
  • 1990 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1991 – Phil Collins
  • 1992 – Mick Hucknall
  • 1993 – Colin Angus and Richard West
  • 1994 – Gary Barlow
  • 1995 – Tony Mortimer
  • 1996 – Damon Albarn, Graham Coxon, Alex James, Dave Rowntree and Noel Gallagher (presented jointly)
  • 1997 – George Michael
  • 1998 – Richard Ashcroft
  • 1999 – Guy Chambers and Robbie Williams
  • 2000 – Fran Healy
  • 2001 – Craig David and Mark Hill
  • 2002 – Dido Armstrong
  • 2003 – Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion and Chris Martin
  • 2004 – Ed Graham, Dan Hawkins, Justin Hawkins and Frankie Poullain
  • 2005 – Tom Chaplin, Richard Hughes and Tim Rice-Oxley
  • 2006 – Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett
  • 2007 – Dan Gillespie Sells, Ciaran Jeremiah, Kevin Jeremiah, Richard Jones and Paul Stewart
  • 2008 – Mika
  • 2009 – Eg White
  • 2010 – Lily Allen and Greg Kurstin
  • 2011 – Ben Drew
  • 2012 – Adele Adkins
  • 2013 – Calvin Harris
  • 2014 – Tom Odell
  • 2015 – Ed Sheeran
  • 2016 – Adele
  • 2017 – Skepta
  • 2018 – Ed Sheeran

PRS for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music

  • 1977 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1979 – Jeff Lynne
  • 1981 – John Lennon
  • 1982 – Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Kenney Jones, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend
  • 1983 – Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford
  • 1984 – Andy Brown, Peter Kircher, Alan Lancaster, Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi
  • 1985 – Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, John Lodge, Patrick Moraz and Ray Thomas
  • 1986 – Elton John
  • 1987 – John Deacon, Freddie Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor
  • 1988 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1989 – Mark Knopfler and John Illsley
  • 1990 – David Bowie
  • 1991 – Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and Bill Wyman
  • 1992 – David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters and Richard Wright
  • 1993 – Bernie Calvert, Allan Clarke, Bobby Elliott, Tony Hicks, Graham Nash and Terry Sylvester
  • 1994 – Tim Rice
  • 1995 – Lonnie Donegan
  • 1996 – Kenney Jones, Ronnie Lane, Steve Marriott and Ian McLagan
  • 1997 – Elvis Costello
  • 1998 – Morrissey
  • 1999 – Chrissie Hynde
  • 2000 – Chris Lowe and Neil Tennant
  • 2001 – Topper Headon, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon and Joe Strummer
  • 2002 – Kate Bush
  • 2003 – Bryan Ferry
  • 2004 – Errol Brown
  • 2005 – Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes, Andy Taylor, John Taylor and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Ray Davies
  • 2007 – Norman Cook
  • 2008 – Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook
  • 2009 – Robert Del Naja, Grant Marshall and Andrew Vowles
  • 2010 – Trevor Horn
  • 2011 – Paul Rodgers
  • 2012 – Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Mark Owen and Robbie Williams
  • 2013 – Justin Hayward
  • 2014 – Jeff Beck
  • 2015 – Boy George
  • 2016 – Geoff Barrow, Beth Gibbons and Adrian Utley
  • 2017 – Anne Dudley
  • 2018 – Billy Bragg

International Achievement

  • 1970 – Tom Jones
  • 1980 – Paul McCartney
  • 1991 – Albert Hammond
  • 1992 – Bernie Taupin
  • 1993 – Rod Temperton
  • 1994 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 1997 – Noel Hogan and Dolores O’Riordan
  • 1998 – Enya, Nicky Ryan and Roma Ryan
  • 1999 – Martin Gore
  • 2001 – Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris, Nicko McBrain, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith
  • 2002 – Sting
  • 2003 – Astro, James Brown, Ali Campbell, Robin Campbell, Earl Falconer, Norman Hassan, Brian Travers and Michael Virtue
  • 2004 – Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O’Brien, Phil Selway and Thom Yorke
  • 2005 – Robert Smith
  • 2006 – Ian Anderson
  • 2008 – Phil Collins
  • 2010 – Imogen Heap
  • 2011 – Matthew Bellamy, Dominic Howard and Christopher Wolstenholme
  • 2013 – Gavin Rossdale
  • 2014 – Ted Dwane, Ben Lovett, Winston Marshall and Marcus Mumford
  • 2016 – Wayne Hector
  • 2017 – Florence Welch
  • 2018 – Billy Ocean

Outstanding Contribution to British Musical Theatre

  • 1994 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1996 – Cameron Mackintosh

Lifetime Achievement

  • 1980 – Edgar Yipsel Harburg and Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1983 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1989 – Cliff Richard
  • 1992 – Eric Clapton
  • 1993 – George Shearing
  • 1994 – Ron Goodwin
  • 1995 – Van Morrison
  • 1997 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1999 – Rod Stewart
  • 2001 – Pete Townshend
  • 2007 – Peter Gabriel
  • 2008 – David Gilmour
  • 2010 – Paul Weller
  • 2012 – Mark Knopfler
  • 2014 – Christine McVie
  • 2015 – Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne and Bill Ward
  • 2016 – Damon Albarn
  • 2017 – Nitin Sawhney

The Jimmy Kennedy Award

  • 1985 – Tommie Connor
  • 1986 – Lionel Bart
  • 1987 – Hugh Charles
  • 1988 – Norman Newell
  • 1989 – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1990 – Herbert Kretzmer
  • 1991 – John Barry
  • 1992 – Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • 1993 – Les Reed
  • 1994 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1995 – Don Black
  • 1996 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1997 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1998 – Barry Mason
  • 1999 – Peter Callander and Mitch Murray
  • 2000 – Geoff Stephens

Outstanding Song Collection

  • 1993 – Marcella Detroit, Siobhan Fahey and Dave Stewart
  • 1994 – Paul Weller
  • 1995 – Elvis Costello
  • 1996 – Joan Armatrading
  • 1997 – Richard Thompson
  • 1998 – Johnny McElhone and Sharleen Spiteri
  • 1999 – Wallis Buchanan, Simon Katz, Jason Kay, Derrick McKenzie, Toby Smith and Stuart Zender
  • 2000 – Mike Barson, Mark Bedford, Chris Foreman, Cathal Smyth, Suggs, Lee Thompson and Daniel Woodgate
  • 2001 – Roy Wood
  • 2002 – Mick Hucknall
  • 2003 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 2004 – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley, Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 2005 – John Deacon, Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Philip Cunningham, Gillian Gilbert, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Bernard Sumner
  • 2007 – Yusuf Islam
  • 2008 – Gabrielle
  • 2009 – Vince Clarke
  • 2011 – Steve Winwood
  • 2012 – Gary Kemp
  • 2013 – Noel Gallagher
  • 2014 – Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons
  • 2015 – Albert Hammond
  • 2016 – Charlie Burchill, Derek Forbes, Jim Kerr and Mick MacNeil
  • 2017 – Pulp
  • 2018 – Cathy Dennis

PRS for Music Special International Award

  • 1999 – Hal David
  • 2000 – Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
  • 2001 – Stevie Wonder
  • 2002 – Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus
  • 2003 – Brian Wilson
  • 2004 – Lamont Dozier, Brian Holland and Eddie Holland
  • 2005 – Lou Reed
  • 2006 – Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff
  • 2007 – Quincy Jones
  • 2008 – Diane Warren
  • 2009 – Smokey Robinson
  • 2010 – Neil Sedaka
  • 2011 – Stephen Sondheim
  • 2012 – Jimmy Webb
  • 2013 – Randy Newman
  • 2014 – Nile Rodgers
  • 2015 – Paul Williams
  • 2016 – Bryan Adams
  • 2017 – Bill Withers
  • 2018 – Lionel Richie

BASCA Fellowship

  • 2006 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 2009 – David Ferguson
  • 2009 – Don Black
  • 2010 – Tim Rice
  • 2012 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 2015 – Annie Lennox

The Ivors Inspiration Award

  • 2008 – Jazzie B
  • 2009 – Edwyn Collins
  • 2010 – Johnny Marr
  • 2011 – Dizzee Rascal
  • 2012 – Siouxsie Sioux
  • 2013 – Marc Almond
  • 2014 – Jerry Dammers
  • 2015 – James Dean Bradfield, Sean Moore and Nicky Wire
  • 2016 – Mark Day, Paul Davis, Paul Ryder, Shaun Ryder and Gary Whelan
  • 2017 – Gary Numan
  • 2018 – Shane MacGowan

The Ivors Classical Music Award

  • 2003 – Boots of Lead – Simon Holt
  • 2004 – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2005 – John Tavener
  • 2006 – Harrison Birtwistle
  • 2007 – John Rutter
  • 2008 – Jonathan Dove
  • 2009 – James MacMillan
  • 2010 – Peter Maxwell Davies
  • 2011 – Michael Nyman
  • 2013 – Errollyn Wallen
  • 2014 – John McCabe
  • 2015 – Judith Weir
  • 2016 – Oliver Knussen
  • 2018 – Thea Musgrave

The Ivors Jazz Award

  • 2012 – Stan Tracey
  • 2017 – John Surman

Genre or Style-Specific Awards

Best Instrumental or Light Orchestral Work

  • 1956 – The Dam Busters – Eric Coates
  • 1957 – The Westminster Waltz – Robert Farnon
  • 1958 – Elizabethan Serenade – Ronald Binge
  • 1959 – Lingering Lovers – Ron Goodwin
  • 1960 – Windows of Parish – Tony Osborne
  • 1961 – Seashore – Robert Farnon
  • 1962 – The Secrets of the Seine – Tony Osborne
  • 1963 – Nicola – Steve Race
  • 1964 – Carlos’ Theme – Ivor Slaney
  • 1965 – Bombay Duckling – Max Harris
  • 1966 – March of the Mods – Tony Carr
  • 1967 – The Power Game – Wayne Hill
  • 1968 – Love in the Open Air – Paul McCartney
  • 1969 – Ring of Kerry – Peter Hope
  • 1971 – March from the Colour Suite – Gordon Langford
  • 1975 – Four Dances from Aladdin – Ernest Tomlinson
  • 1976 – Introduction and Air to a Stained Glass Window – John Gregory
  • 1977 – Rain Forest – Biddu
  • 1978 – Cavatina – Stanley Myers
  • 1979 – Song For Guy – Elton John
  • 1980 – War of the Worlds – Jeff Wayne and Gary Osborne

Best Comedy Song

  • 1956 – Got’n Idea – Paddy Roberts and Jack Woodman
  • 1958 – Three Brothers – Paddy Roberts
  • 1959 – I’m So Ashamed – Ken Hare
  • 1960 – The Ballad of Bethnal Green – Paddy Roberts
  • 1964 – Flash, Bang, Wallop – David Heneker
  • 1966 – A Windmill In Old Amsterdam – Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge
  • 1967 – Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy? – Allan Smethurst
  • 1968 – Grocer Jack – Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • 1969 – I’m the Urban Spaceman – Neil Innes
  • 1971 – Grandad – Herbie Flowers and Ken Pickett
  • 1972 – Ernie – Benny Hill
  • 1973 – The People Tree – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1974 – Nice One Cyril – Helen Clarke and Harold Spiro

Best Swing / Rhythm Composition

  • 1956 – Big City Suite – Ralph Dollimore
  • 1957 – Itinerary of an Orchestra – Johnny Dankworth and Dave Lindup
  • 1958 – Overdrive – Tommy Watt

Best Jazz Work

  • 1959 – The Colonel’s Tune – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1960 – Beaulieu Festival Suite – Kenny Graham
  • 1961 – Apache – Jerry Lordan
  • 1962 – African Waltz – Galt Macdermot
  • 1963 – Outbreak of Murder – Gordon Franks
  • 1964 – What the Dickens – Johnny Dankworth

Best Beat Song

  • 1966 – It’s Not Unusual – Gordon Mills and Les Reed
  • 1969 – Build Me Up Buttercup – Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • 1974 – Rubber Bullets – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley and Graham Gouldman

Best Ballad or Romantic Song

  • 1969 – I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten – Clive Westlake
  • 1971 – Home Lovin’ Man – Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway and Tony Macaulay
  • 1972 – No Matter How I Try – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1973 – The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face – Ewan MacColl
  • 1974 – Won’t Somebody Dance with Me – Lynsey De Paul

The Best Pop Song

  • 1971 – Love Grows – Tony Macaulay and Barry Mason
  • 1972 – Simple Game – Mike Pinder
  • 1973 – Oh Babe What Could I Say – Hurricane Smith
  • 1974 – You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me – Tony Macaulay and Geoff Stephens
  • 1975 – Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas
  • 1976 – I’m Not In Love – Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 1977 – Don’t Go Breaking My Heart – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Baker Street – Gerry Rafferty
  • 1980 – I Don’t Like Mondays – Bob Geldof
  • 1981 – Stop the Cavalry – Jona Lewie
  • 1982 – Every Little Thing She Does is Magic – Sting
  • 1983 – Our House – Carl Smyth and Chris Foreman
  • 1984 – Karma Chameleon – Boy George, John Moss, Michael Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett

Best Middle of the Road Song

  • 1976 – Harry – Catherine Howe
  • 1977 – Music – John Miles

The Ivors Dance Award

  • 1998 – You’re Not Alone – Tim Kellett and Robin Taylor-Firth
  • 1999 – Horny – Mousse T and Errol Rennalls
  • 2000 – Re-Rewind – Mark Hill/Craig David
  • 2001 – Woman Trouble – Mark Hill, Craig David, Robbie Craig and Pete Devereux
  • 2002 – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head – Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis
  • 2003 – Lazy – Ashley Beedle, Darren House, Darren Rock and David Byrne
  • 2004 – Strict Machine – Alison Goldfrapp, Will Gregory and Nick Batt

Musicals, Films, Television, Radio, and Video Games

The Best Song From a Musical

  • 1956 – Salad Days – Dorothy Reynolds and Julian Slade
  • 1958 – Free as Air – Dorothy Reynolds, Julian Slade
  • 1960 – Lock Up Your Daughters – Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson
  • 1961 – Oliver! – Lionel Bart
  • 1962 – Stop the World I Want to Get Off – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1966 – Charlie Girl – David Heneker and John Taylor
  • 1972 – I Don’t Know How To Love Him – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best British Musical

  • 1963 – Summer Holiday – Brian Bennett, Stanley Black, Ronald Cass, Mike Conlin, Hank Marvin, Peter Myers, Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • 1965 – Robert and Elizabeth – Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar
  • 1974 – Jesus Christ Superstar – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1975 – Treasure Island – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1976 – Great Expectations – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1978 – Privates on Parade – Denis King and Peter Nicholls
  • 1979 – Evita – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1980 – Songbook – Monty Norman and Julian Mo
  • 1982 – Cats – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn
  • 1983 – Windy City – Tony Macaulay and Dick Vosburgh
  • 1984 – Blood Brothers – Willie Russell
  • 1985 – The Hired Man – Howard Goodall
  • 1986 – Me and My Girl – Reginald Armitage and Douglas Furber
  • 1987 – The Phantom of the Opera – Charles Hart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe
  • 1990 – Aspects of Love – Don Black, Charles Hart and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1992 – Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best Film Score Theme or Song

  • 1957 – The March Hare – Philip Green
  • 1959 – Inn of the Sixth Happiness – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1967 – Born Free – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1973 – Diamonds Are Forever – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Bright Eyes – Mike Batt
  • 1980 – Caravans – Mike Batt
  • 1981 – Xanadu – Jeff Lynne
  • 1982 – The French Lieutenant’s Woman – Carl Davis
  • 1983 – For All Mankind – Ravi Shankar and George Fenton
  • 1984 – Going Home – Mark Knopfler
  • 1985 – We All Stand Together – Paul McCartney
  • 1986 – We Don’t Need Another Hero – Graham Lyle and Terry Britten
  • 1987 – Sweet Freedom – Rod Temperton
  • 1988 – Cry Freedom – George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa
  • 1989 – Two Hearts – Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier
  • 1990 – Henry V Nons Nobis Domine – Patrick Doyle
  • 1991 – Witches – Stanley Myers
  • 1992 – Under Suspicion – Christopher Gunning
  • 1993 – Tears in Heaven – Eric Clapton and Will Jennings
  • 1994 – The Piano – Michael Nyman
  • 1995 – Circle of Life – Elton John and Tim Rice
  • 1996 – Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman – Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange, Michael Kamen and Bryan Adams
  • 1998 – Picture of You – Paul Wilson, Andy Watkins, Ronan Keating and Eliot Kennedy
  • 1999 – The Flame Still Burns – Chris Difford, Marti Frederiksen and Mick Jones

Best Original Film Score

  • 1968 – Doctor Dolittle – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1969 – Madwoman of Caillot – Michael Lewis
  • 1976 – Murder on the Orient Express – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 1979 – The Silent Witness – Alan Hawkshaw
  • 1995 – Shadowlands – George Fenton
  • 1996 – Don Juan De Marco – Michael Kamen
  • 1997 – 101 Dalmatians – Michael Kamen
  • 1998 – William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet – Craig Armstrong, Marius De Vries and Nellee Hooper
  • 1999 – Firelight – Christopher Gunning
  • 2000 – The World Is Not Enough – David Arnold
  • 2001 – X-Men – Michael Kamen
  • 2002 – Shrek – Harry Gregson-Williams and John Powell
  • 2003 – The Quiet American – Craig Armstrong
  • 2004 – Max – Dan Jones
  • 2005 – Enduring Love – Jeremy Sams
  • 2006 – Evil – Francis Shaw
  • 2007 – Ice Age: The Meltdown – John Powell
  • 2008 – Atonement – Dario Marianelli
  • 2009 – There Will Be Blood – Jonny Greenwood
  • 2010 – Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs – John Powell
  • 2011 – How To Train Your Dragon – John Powell
  • 2012 – The First Grader – Alex Heffes
  • 2013 – Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
  • 2014 – The Epic of Everest – Simon Fisher Turner
  • 2015 – ‘71 – David Holmes
  • 2016 – Ex_Machina – Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury
  • 2017 – Kubo and the Two Strings – Dario Marianelli
  • 2018 – Jackie – Mica Levi

Best Television or Radio Theme or Song

  • 1962 – The Maigret Theme – Ron Grainer
  • 1963 – Steptoe and Son – Ron Grainer
  • 1964 – Theme from ‘The Avengers’ – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1965 – Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life – Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin
  • 1971 – Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mr Hitler – Jimmy Perry and Derek Taverner
  • 1974 – Galloping Home – Denis King
  • 1975 – No Honestly! – Lynsey De Paul
  • 1976 – The Edwardians (Upstairs, Downstairs Theme) – Alexander Faris
  • 1977 – Sam – John McCabe
  • 1978 – Poldark – Kenyon Emrys-Roberts
  • 1979 – Lillie – Joseph Horovitz
  • 1980 – Nunc Dimittis – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1981 – I Could Be So Good for You – Gerard Kenny and Patricia Waterman
  • 1982 – Brideshead Revisited – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1983 – Theme From Harry’s Game – Paul Brennan
  • 1984 – That’s Livin’ Alright – David Mackay and Ken Ashby
  • 1985 – Jewel in the Crown – George Fenton
  • 1986 – Edge of Darkness – Eric Clapton and Michael Kamen
  • 1987 – The Monocled Mutineer – George Fenton
  • 1988 – Fortunes of War – Richard Holmes
  • 1989 – Testament – Nigel Hess
  • 1990 – Ruth Rendell Mysteries – Brian Bennett
  • 1991 – Victorian Kitchen – Paul Reade
  • 1992 – Darling Buds of May – Philip Burley and Barrie Guard
  • 1993 – Civvies – Michael Storey
  • 1994 – Stalag Luft – Stanley Myers
  • 1995 – Middlemarch – Stanley Myers
  • 1996 – The Hanging Gale – Shaun Davey
  • 1997 – Hetty Wainthropp Investigates – Nigel Hess
  • 1998 – Rebecca – Christopher Gunning
  • 1999 – Close Relations – Rob Lane
  • 2000 – Trial By Fire – Richard G Mitchell
  • 2001 – Gormenghast – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2002 – The Blue Planet – George Fenton

Best Television or Radio Soundtrack

  • 1973 – Colditz – Robert Farnon
  • 2003 – Feltham Sings – Dextrous and Simon Armitage
  • 2004 – The Young Visitors – Nicholas Hooper
  • 2005 – Blackpool – Rob Lane
  • 2006 – Elizabeth I – Rob Lane
  • 2007 – The Virgin Queen – Martin Phipps
  • 2008 – Oliver Twist – Martin Phipps
  • 2009 – Wallace and Gromit (A Matter of Loaf and Death) – Julian Nott
  • 2010 – Desperate Romantics – Daniel Pemberton
  • 2011 – Any Human Heart – Dan Jones
  • 2012 – The Shadow Line – Martin Phipps
  • 2013 – Lucian Freud: Painted Life – John Harle
  • 2014 – Ripper Street – Dominik Scherrer
  • 2015 – The Honourable Woman – Natalie Holt and Martin Phipps
  • 2016 – London Spy – Keefus Ciancia and David Holmes
  • 2017 – War and Peace – Martin Phipps
  • 2018 – The Miniaturist – Dan Jones

Best Theme from a Commercial

  • 1990 – Abbey Endings (Abbey National) – Lionel Bart
  • 1991 – Only You (Fiat Tempra) – Geoff MacCormack and Simon Goldenberg
  • 1992 – Driven By You (Ford Motor Company) – Brian May

Best Original Video Game Score

  • 2010 – Killzone 2 – Joris de Man
  • 2011 – Napoleon: Total War – Richard Beddow, Richard Birdsall and Ian Livingstone
  • 2018 – Horizon Zero Dawn – Joris de Man, Joe Henson and Alexis Smith

Ivor Novello Awards – The 1960s

Before we launch into the “Ivors” from the sixties, a quick word about the credits here. The Ivor Novello Awards are, unusually and entirely laudably, given for songwriting rather than performing, but that isn’t necessarily compatible with most people understand music. In the interests of context, I’ve therefore added performer names where I know them (but I didn’t bother researching them in a lot of detail, so please comment below if you see things you feel need changing!)

Apart from the usual pop suspects, it’s great to see awards and nominations for John Barry and Ron Grainer in amongst these lists!

Ivor Novello Awards 1960

The fifth Ivor Novello Awards were broadcast on BBC Television on 6th June 1960, with Eric Robinson conducting the Orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: Side Saddle, written by Russ Conway. Also nominated: Living Doll, by Lionel Bart
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: The Village of St. Bernadette, written by Eula Parker. Also nominated: Maybe This Year, by Ronald Wakley and Marcel Stellman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Item: The Ballad of Bethnal Green, written by Paddy Roberts. Also nominated: Little White Bull, by Michael Pratt, Lionel Bart and Tommy Steele
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Beaulieu Festival Suite, written by Kenny Graham. Also nominated: Jazzboatby Joe Henderson
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Windows of Parish, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Ring Ding, by Steve Race
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Lock Up Your Daughters, written by Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson. Also nominated: Meet The Familyby Peter Greenwell and Peter Wildeblood
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Lionel Bart

Ivor Novello Awards 1961

The 1961 ceremony was presented by W.E. Butlin, and broadcast on BBC Television on 20th May 1961. The broadcast was introduced by David Jacobs, and starred Max Bygraves, Georgia Brown, Matt Monro, Craig Douglas, Bert Weedon, Paddy Roberts, Max Harris and Douglas Gamley. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra which was led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: As Long As He Needs Me, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: Apache, performed by The Shadows, written by Jerry Lordan
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: Portrait Of My Love, written by Norman Newell and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: As Long As He Needs Me, by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Seashore, written by Robert Farnon. Also nominated: The Willow Waltz, by Cyril Watters
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Apache. Also nominated: Hit and Miss, by John Barry
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Oliver, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: The Gurney Slade Theme, by Max Harris
  • Judges’ Choice Award (any work which in the opinion of the Judges, is worthy of an Award, but which may not necessarily be governed by Existing Categories): Goodness Gracious Me, written by Herbert Kretzmer and David Lee. Also nominated: The Belle of Barking Creek, by Paddy Roberts
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Eric Maschwitz
  • Special Award: What Do You Want If You Don’t Want Money?, written by Johnny Worth

Ivor Novello Awards 1962

W.E. Butlin turned up again for the 1962 ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 13th May 1962. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Cliff Richard and The Shadows, Anthony Newley, Helen Shapiro and Her Hair, Matt Monro, Johnny Dankworth and His Orchestra, Tony Osborne, Ron Grainer and The Ivor Raymonde Singers. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: My Kind of Girl, written by Leslie Bricusse. Also nominated: Portrait of My Love, by Cyril Ornadel and Norman Newell
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1961 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Walkin’ Back To Happiness, written by Michael Hawker and John Schroeder. Also nominated: Are You Sure, by Bob Allison and John Allison
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: What Kind of Fool Am I?, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley. Also nominated: No Greater Love, by Michael Carr and Bunny Lewis
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: The Secrets of the Seine, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Stranger on the Shore, by Acker Bilk
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: African Waltz, written by Galt Macdermot. Also nominated: Duddly Dell, by Dudley Moore
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Stage Play: Stop The World I Want to Get Off, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: The Maigret Theme, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: The Avengers’ Theme, by Johnny Dankworth
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Cliff Richard and The Shadows

Ivor Novello Awards 1963

For the third year running, W.E. Butlin presented the eighth Ivor Novello ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 4th May 1963. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Acker Bilk, Matt Monro, The Tornados, Steve Race, Ron Grainer, Gordon Franks and Cliff Richard and The Shadows.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Stranger on the Shore, written by Acker Bilk. Also nominated: Wonderful Land, by Jerry Lordan
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1962 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Telstar, written by Joe Meek. Also nominated: Bachelor Boy, by Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: My Love and Devotion, written by Howard Barnes, Harold Fields and Joe Roncoroni. Also nominated: Jeannie, by Norman Newell and Russ Conway
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral or Other Non-Vocal Composition: Nicola, written by Steve Race. Also nominated: Turkish Coffee, by Tony Osborne
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: Outbreak of Murder, written by Gordon Franks. Also nominated: Revival, by Joe Harriott
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical: Summer Holiday, performed by Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Also nominated: Blitz, written by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: Steptoe and Son, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: March from A Little Suite, by Trevor Duncan
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Popular and Light Music: Lawrence Wright

Ivor Novello Awards 1964

As we now know, 1963 was the year when popular music changed for good, with The Beatles rising to fame. For the 1964 award ceremony, they evolved quickly, ditching most of the jazz instrumentals and switching to a heavy focus on the Fab Four.

  • The Most Broadcast Work of the Year: She Loves You, performed by The Beatles and written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Dance One, by Elaine Murtagh, Valerie Murtagh and Ray Adams
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1963 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: She Loves You, by The Beatles. Also nominated: I Want To Hold Your Hand, same artist
  • The Year’s Outstanding Song: If I Ruled The World, written by Leslie Bricusse and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: All My Loving, by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Carlos’ Theme, written by Ivor Slaney. Also nominated: Scarlett O’Hara, by Jerry Lordan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Jazz Work: What the Dickens, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Sweet September, by Bill McGuffie
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Show, For Stage, Cinema, Television or Radio: Theme from The Avengers, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Half a Sixpence, by David Heneker
  • The Year’s Most Amusing or Novel Composition: Flash, Bang, Wallop, written by David Heneker. Also nominated: Harvest of Love, by Benny Hill and Tony Hatch
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: The Beatles and some additional hangers-on (Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr)
  • Special Award in Recognition of Fifty Years’ Service to the Music Industry: Performing Rights Society

Ivor Novello Awards 1965

The tenth ceremony, somewhat hilariously sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin (yes, him), took place on 13th July 1965 at the Savoy Hotel.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Can’t Buy Me Love, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1964 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Can’t Buy Me Love. Also nominated: I Feel Fine, same artist
  • Outstanding Song of 1964: Downtown, written by Tony Hatch. Also nominated: Losing You, by Tom Springfield and Clive Westlake
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Bombay Duckling, written by Max Harris
  • The Year’s Outstanding Theme from Radio, TV or Film: Not So Much A Programme, More A Way Of Life, written by Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Robert and Elizabeth, written by Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar. Also nominated: Maggie May, written by Lionel Bart
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Paddy Roberts

Ivor Novello Awards 1966

The 1966 ceremony, also sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, took place at the Hammersmith Palais, London, and was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra. It was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 12th July 1966.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: I’ll Never Find Another You, written by Tom Springfield. Also nominated: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1965 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: We Can Work It Out, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Help
  • Outstanding Song of 1965: Yesterday, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Where Are You Now My Love, written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • The Year’s Outstanding Beat Song: It’s Not Unusual, performed by Tom Jones, written by Gordon Mills and Les Reed. Also nominated: Look Through Any Window, by Graham Gouldman and Charles Silverman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Composition: A Windmill In Old Amsterdam, written by Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge. Also nominated: Mrs Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter, written by Trevor Peacock
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Charlie Girl, written by David Heneker and John Taylor
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contemporary Folk Song: Catch the Wind, by Donovan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Instrumental Composition: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr. Also nominated: The Kiss, by Jack Parnell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: BBC TV, for the production of the series A Song For Europe

Ivor Novello Awards 1967

Still sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, the twelfth ceremony took place at the Lyceum Ballroom, London, was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra, and was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 27th March 1967.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Michelle, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Yesterday
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1966 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Yellow Submarine, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: What Would I Be, written by Jackie Trent
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Winchester Cathedral, written by Geoff Stephens. Also nominated: Call Me, written by Tony Hatch
  • Film Song of the Year: Born Free, written by John Barry and Don Black. Also nominated: Time Drags By, performed by The Shadows, written by Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch, Brian Bennett and John Rostill
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy?, written by Allan Smethurst. Also nominated: Dedicated Follower of Fashion, written by Ray Davies
  • Instrumental Composition of the Year: The Power Game, written by Wayne Hill. Also nominated: Khartoum, written by Frank Cordell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Joe Loss

Ivor Novello Awards 1968

For some reason, from 1968 onwards, history no longer seems to record the nominated but losing entries.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Puppet on a String, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1967 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: The Last Waltz, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: A Whiter Shade of Pale, performed by Procul Harum, written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid
  • Best British Song, Musically and Lyrically: She’s Leaving Home, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Grocer Jack, written by Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • Best Instrumental Theme: Love in the Open Air, written by Paul McCartney
  • Special Award: Leslie Bricusse, for The Film Score Doctor Dolittle
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Alan Herbert

Ivor Novello Awards 1969

The fourteenth Ivor Novello Awards were sponsored by the BBC, and took place on 22nd May 1969.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Congratulations, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1968 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Hey Jude, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Delilah, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • The Most Romantic Song of the Year: I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten, written by Clive Westlake
  • Outstanding Dance / Beat Song of the Year: Build Me Up Buttercup, written by Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • Novelty Song of the Year: I’m The Urban Spaceman, written by Neil Innes
  • Light Music Composition of the Year: Ring of Kerry, written by Peter Hope
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Andrew Gold (presented posthumously)

Further Reading

Stowaway Heroes – Delia Derbyshire

Time for another of our Stowaway Heroes now. This week, one of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop’s most important and influential musicians. Delia Derbyshire is the person who brought Ron Grainer‘s Doctor Who theme music to life in a quite extraordinary way.

Derbyshire joined the BBC in 1960, and stayed for thirteen years, working on numerous well-known and loved series and one-off shows, one of which was The Last Caravans, an episode of The World About Us, for which she composed the brilliant Blue Veils and Golden Sands:

Little is known of her work after leaving the BBC, although following her untimely death in 2001 an extensive collection of tapes were found in her attic and digitised. Perhaps her most famous non-BBC work was as a member of the group White Noise, who released the early electronic album An Electric Storm in 1969.

Delia Derbyshire‘s musical career was a lot shorter than it really should have been – somebody this influential should definitely have a back catalogue of albums to their name. Maybe one day she will. But for now, with a career shrouded in mystery, she is one of the most important of our Stowaway Heroes.

Music for the Masses 31 – 9 February 2005

It’s always a pleasure to be able to hide the odd nine-minute gem in the middle of a radio show, such as the brilliant Virus Mix of Everything But The Girl‘s Lullaby of Clubland. Surprisingly, the webcam shows me looking relaxed in the extreme.

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Show 31: Wed 9 Feb 2005, from 6:05pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: Massive Attack.

  • The Grid – Heartbeat
  • Trance Atlantic Air-Waves – Chase
  • Sylver – Take Me Back
  • The Human League – Love Me Madly?
  • Everything But The Girl – Lullaby of Clubland (Virus Mix)
  • The Postal Service – We Will Become Silhouettes
  • Inspiral Carpets – Saturn 5
  • Massive Attack – Unfinished Sympathy
  • Camouflage – The Great Commandment
  • Visage – Fade to Grey
  • Pet Shop Boys – How Can You Expect to Be Taken Seriously? (Ragga Zone Remix)
  • The Orb – Once More
  • Massive Attack – Karmacoma
  • Mirwais feat. Craig Wedren – Miss You
  • Lemon Jelly – The Slow Train
  • Moby – Lift Me Up
  • Mylo – Destroy Rock and Roll
  • Ron Grainer – Doctor Who Theme
  • Massive Attack – Butterfly Caught (Paul Daley Remix)
  • Kings of Convenience – Know-How

Various Artists – Electrospective

The basic way this blog works is that when I’m reviewing an album, I listen to it in full, and while doing so write what I feel about what I’m hearing. How, then, do I tackle a two-and-a-half hour long compilation? I feel the skip button may be seeing some usage on this occasion.

Electrospective is the centrepiece of a recent record company campaign to get us buying mid-price synth-based albums of which I heartily approve. The compilation is a fascinating and wonderful journey, encompassing maybe ten tracks from each of the primary decades of electronic music. But its omissions are also fascinating. Perversely, almost, it contains none of the pioneering sound of Jean Michel Jarre or Kraftwerk. The early 1980s focus rightly on OMD and The Human League, but there’s no sign of Soft Cell or Frankie Goes to Hollywood. The late 1980s largely forego the “indie dance” and trip hop movements in favour of pop and soul. But then, if you were faced with the task of compiling a forty-track journey through the history of electronic music, how would you tackle it?

Electrospective opens, as all definitive electronic compilations should, with Delia Derbyshire‘s 1963 version of Ron Grainer‘s essential Doctor Who theme. Fifty years on, in an age where literally anybody can make music with their portable telecommunications devices, it’s difficult to picture the boffins of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop slaving away generating tape samples and cutting them into exactly the right length to sync and make quite astonishing music. In a sense it’s unsurprising that they didn’t really succeed with the syncing (Derbyshire also revisited the theme in 1967 to create a rather more orderly but definitely less charming version).

Some of the other early tracks are a little odder. Roxy Music‘s Virginia Plain is, I can only assume, here to show some of the early electronic experimentation in which popular acts of the early 1970s were indulging, and it has a few nice Moog sounds in it, but frankly it’s largely tolerable at best. Even Brian Eno, introducing this album to its first taste of ambience, fails to impress particularly with Here Come the Warm Jets (1974).

The 1970s start to look a lot stronger after this, with Tangerine Dream‘s Rubycon and Can‘s brilliant I Want More before launching into another unmissable moment with The Normal‘s Warm Leatherette. The final trio of Cabaret VoltaireTelex and Simple Minds round of 1979 in less compelling fashion, and you should be clear by now that electronics is firmly planted in the world of music.

We then enter the 1980s in typically variable fashion. OMD‘s excellent Messages carries into Ultravox‘s more questionable SleepwalkThe Human League‘s astonishing The Things That Dreams are Made Of is followed by rather more questionable choices from Duran Duran and Heaven 17, and then a distinctly dodgy choice of remix for Yazoo‘s Don’t Go.

The mid-1980s are, as you might expect, rather stronger. Together in Electric Dreams is perhaps a little unnecessary, coming as it does only five tracks after the previous Human League moment, but then West End Girls mixes into Who Needs Live (Like That), and you’re definitely reminded that the eighties weren’t nearly as bad as everyone seems to suggest.

All this is not to say that this album is without its surprises. Nitzer Ebb‘s Control I’m Here is an unexpected pleasure, as is Soul II Soul‘s Back to Life (However Do You Want Me), which ends the 1980s a couple of tracks into the second disc.

The 1990s are, of course, where electronic music comes of age. A whole slew of enormous, exceptional, and very well chosen hits follow from Depeche ModeMobyThe Future Sound of LondonDaft Punk and Adam FMassive Attack turn up, as indeed they should, but here they are represented by the slightly disappointing choice of Inertia Creeps, by no means bad, but a track which surely belongs in the middle of Mezzanine rather than here?

Air‘s wonderful Kelly Watch the Stars and St. Germain‘s Rose Rouge are here to represent the rest of the late 90s French invasion, which is inevitably followed by the experimental indie of Radiohead and The Chemical Brothers.

Finally, our potted history of electronic music has brought us into the 2000s, by which time “electronic” had definitely ceased to be a label for weird experimental noises or extravagant expressionism. It had, in every imaginable way, gone mainstream. In a good way.

Goldfrapp hammer this home beautifully with the essential Strict Machine, and then Dare by Gorillaz leads us through to a string of 21st century floor fillers. Eric Prydz‘s probably Bo Selecta-inspired Proper Education with its Pink Floyd elements leads us into some less interesting tracks from David GuettaDeadmau5, and finally a total abomination by Swedish House Mafia. Not a great ending, admittedly, but a fair assessment of the journey of electronic music over the past half century.

Make no mistake – in terms of meeting its remit of compiling a handful of tracks from every decade of electronic music, this is a great release. But it’s difficult to ignore the many omissions – you can’t help but feel that perhaps a themed or era-specific compilation might tick the boxes a lot more convincingly. In the end, all you get is fleeting glimpses of particular acts and eras. All told though, for all its failings it’s a great listen, and I can’t help but recommend it.

There’s also a companion remix album, which we’ll touch on in a future week. If you’re in the US you can find Electrospective here; if you’re in the UK try here; and if you’re anywhere else then you’ll have to fend for yourself.