NME Awards 2018

Apparently it’s actually called the V05 NME Awards this year, although honestly I’ve no idea what a V05 is. Anyway, here are the winners, in all their corporate glory!

Best British Band supported by Zig-Zag

  • Alt-J
  • Kasabian
  • Wolf Alice
  • The 1975
  • The xx
  • Bastille

Winner: Alt-J

Best International Band supported by 19 Crimes Winery

  • Haim
  • The National
  • Foo Fighters
  • The Killers
  • Paramore
  • Migos

Winner: Haim

Best British Solo Artist supported by VO5

  • Dua Lipa
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Stormzy
  • Loyle Carner
  • Charli XCX

Winner: Loyle Carner

Best International Solo Artist

  • Kendrick Lamar
  • Taylor Swift
  • Lorde
  • Lana Del Rey
  • St Vincent
  • Father John Misty

Winner: Lorde

Best Live Artist supported by Nikon

  • Kasabian
  • Lorde
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Stormzy
  • LCD Soundsystem
  • Royal Blood

Winner: Kasabian

Best Album supported by Orange Amplification

  • Lorde – Melodrama
  • J Hus – Common Sense
  • Wolf Alice – Visions of a Life
  • Gorillaz – Humanz’
  • Loyle Carner – Yesterday’s Gone
  • The National – Sleep Well Beast

Winner: J Hus

Best New Artist supported by Vans

  • Stefflon Don
  • Sigrid
  • SZA
  • Shame
  • J Hus
  • The Magic Gang

Winner: Stefflon Don

Best Track supported by Estrella Galicia

  • Kasabian – God Bless This Acid House
  • Kendrick Lamar – Humble
  • Lorde – Green Light
  • The Horrors – Something to Remember Me By
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Charli XCX – Boys

Winner: Charli XCX

Best Mixtape supported by Bulldog Gin

  • Charli XCX – Pop 2
  • Drake – More Life
  • Krept & Konan – 7 Nights / 7 Days
  • Rex Orange County – Apricot Princess
  • Dave – Game Over
  • Avelino – No Bullshit

Winner: Avelino

Best Music Video supported by Princess Yachts

  • The Big Moon – Sucker
  • Charli XCX – Boys
  • St Vincent – Los Ageless
  • Taylor Swift – Look What You Made Me Do
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Pale Waves – Television Romance

Winner: The Big Moon

Under The Radar Award supported by HMV

Winner: Pale Waves

Best Collaboration supported by VO5

  • Craig David & Bastille – I Know You
  • Stefflon Don & Skepta – Ding-a-Ling
  • Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile – Lotta See Lice
  • Gorillaz & Jehnny Beth – We Got the Power
  • Lily Allen & Giggs – Trigger Bang
  • Yungen & Yxng Bane – Bestie

Winner: Craig David and Bastille

Best Festival supported by ID&C

  • Glastonbury
  • Reading & Leeds
  • Download
  • Parklife
  • TRNSMT
  • Bestival

Winner: Glastonbury

Best Small Festival

  • Festival Number 6
  • Boardmasters
  • Wilderness
  • Field Day
  • End of the Road
  • Kendal Calling

Winner: Festival Number 6

Best Festival Headliner supported by Anna Valley

  • Muse
  • Boy Better Know
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Foo Fighters
  • The 1975
  • Noel Gallagher

Winner: Muse

Music Moment of the Year

  • Grime4Corbyn
  • Lady Gaga at the Superbowl
  • One Love Manchester
  • The Killers‘ surprise set at Glastonbury
  • Linkin Park‘s Chester Bennington tribute concert
  • Noel Gallagher plays Don’t Look Back in Anger at Manchester Arena

Winner: One Love Manchester

Best Film supported by Zig-Zag

  • T2
  • Bladerunner 2049
  • Baby Driver
  • The Disaster Artist
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • It

Winner: Baby Driver

Best TV Series

  • Stranger Things 2
  • Game of Thrones
  • Westworld
  • Rick & Morty
  • Glow
  • Peaky Blinders

Winner: Stranger Things

Best Music Film

  • Lady Gaga – Five Foot Two
  • L7 – Pretend We’re Dead
  • Sleaford Mods – Bunch of Kunst
  • George Michael – Freedom
  • England is Mine
  • Whitney Houston – Can I Be Me

Winner: Lady Gaga

Best Re-Issue

  • Radiohead – OK NOT OK
  • Prince – Purple Rain
  • The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • R.E.M. – Automatic for the People
  • The Smiths – The Queen is Dead
  • Super Furry Animals – Radiator

Winner: Radiohead

Best Book

  • Wiley – Eskiboy
  • Action Bronson – Fuck, That’s Delicious
  • Dylan Jones – David Bowie: A Life
  • Allan Jones – Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down
  • Lizzy Goodman – Meet Me In The Bathroom
  • The KLF – 2023: A Trilogy

Winner: Wiley

NME Icon

Winner: Shirley Manson

NME Innovation Award

Winner: Boy Better Know

Godlike Genius

Winner: Liam Gallagher

Hero of the Year

  • Ariana Grande
  • Rose McGowan
  • Jeremy Corbyn
  • Ellie Rowsell
  • Big Shaq
  • David Attenborough

Winner: Ariana Grande

Villain of the Year

  • Donald Trump
  • Theresa May
  • Katie Hopkins
  • Piers Morgan
  • Kim Jong-Un
  • Jeremy Hunt

Winner: Piers Morgan

All worthy villains. The ceremony was on February 13th this year.

Edited 12 June 2018 – fix to tense in final sentence.

NME Awards 2018 – Nominations

You may remember the explorations we did late last year into the winners of the NME Poll, variably an awards ceremony and a list of winners, which ran from the 1950s until the 1990s. We’ll pick that up again later this year with a similar investigation into the BRAT Awards in 1994 and the various NME Awards ceremonies that have followed.

For the meantime, though, here are the nominees for the 2018 awards!

Best International Band

  • Haim
  • The National
  • Foo Fighters
  • The Killers
  • Paramore
  • Migos

Best British Solo Artist

  • Dua Lipa
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Stormzy
  • Loyle Carner
  • Charli XCX

Best International Solo Artist

  • Kendrick Lamar
  • Taylor Swift
  • Lorde
  • Lana Del Rey
  • St Vincent
  • Father John Misty

Best Live Artist

  • Kasabian
  • Lorde
  • Liam Gallagher
  • Stormzy
  • LCD Soundsystem
  • Royal Blood

Best Album

  • Lorde – Melodrama
  • J Hus – Common Sense
  • Wolf Alice – Visions of a Life
  • Gorillaz – Humanz’
  • Loyle Carner – Yesterday’s Gone
  • The National – Sleep Well Beast

Best New Artist

  • Stefflon Don
  • Sigrid
  • SZA
  • Shame
  • J Hus
  • The Magic Gang

Best Track

  • Kasabian – God Bless This Acid House
  • Kendrick Lamar – Humble
  • Lorde – Green Light
  • The Horrors – Something to Remember Me By
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Charli XCX – Boys

Best Mixtape

  • Charli XCX – Pop 2
  • Drake – More Life
  • Krept & Konan – 7 Nights / 7 Days
  • Rex Orange County – Apricot Princess
  • Dave – Game Over
  • Avelino – No Bullshit

Best Video

  • The Big Moon – Sucker
  • Charli XCX – Boys
  • St Vincent – Los Ageless
  • Taylor Swift – Look What You Made Me Do
  • Dua Lipa – New Rules
  • Pale Waves – Television Romance

Best Collaboration

  • Craig David & Bastille – I Know You
  • Stefflon Don & Skepta – Ding-a-Ling
  • Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile – Lotta See Lice
  • Gorillaz & Jehnny Beth – We Got the Power
  • Lily Allen & Giggs – Trigger Bang
  • Yungen & Yxng Bane – Bestie

Best Festival

  • Glastonbury
  • Reading & Leeds
  • Download
  • Parklife
  • TRNSMT
  • Bestival

Best Small Festival

  • Festival Number 6
  • Boardmasters
  • Wilderness
  • Field Day
  • End of the Road
  • Kendal Calling

Best Festival Headliner

  • Muse
  • Boy Better Know
  • Ed Sheeran
  • Foo Fighters
  • The 1975
  • Noel Gallagher

Music Moment of the Year

  • Grime4Corbyn
  • Lady Gaga at the Superbowl
  • One Love Manchester
  • The Killers‘ surprise set at Glastonbury
  • Linkin Park‘s Chester Bennington tribute concert
  • Noel Gallagher plays Don’t Look Back in Anger at Manchester Arena

Best Film

  • T2
  • Bladerunner 2049
  • Baby Driver
  • The Disaster Artist
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • It

Best TV Series

  • Stranger Things 2
  • Game of Thrones
  • Westworld
  • Rick & Morty
  • Glow
  • Peaky Blinders

Best Music Film

  • Lady Gaga – Five Foot Two
  • L7 – Pretend We’re Dead
  • Sleaford Mods – Bunch of Kunst
  • George Michael – Freedom
  • England is Mine
  • Whitney Houston – Can I Be Me

Best Re-Issue

  • Radiohead – OK NOT OK
  • Prince – Purple Rain
  • The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • R.E.M. – Automatic for the People
  • The Smiths – The Queen is Dead
  • Super Furry Animals – Radiator

Best Book

  • Wiley – Eskiboy
  • Action Bronson – Fuck, That’s Delicious
  • Dylan Jones – David Bowie: A Life
  • Allan Jones – Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down
  • Lizzy Goodman – Meet Me In The Bathroom
  • The KLF – 2023: A Trilogy

Hero of the Year

  • Ariana Grande
  • Rose McGowan
  • Jeremy Corbyn
  • Ellie Rowsell
  • Big Shaq
  • David Attenborough

Villain of the Year

  • Donald Trump
  • Theresa May
  • Katie Hopkins
  • Piers Morgan
  • Kim Jong-Un
  • Jeremy Hunt

All worthy villains. The ceremony is on February 13th this year.

Propellerheads – Decksandrumsandrockandroll

Propellerheads burst onto the lower reaches of the UK chart at the end of 1996 with Take California, scoring their most significant hit the following year with David Arnold‘s help on their version of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. They were a short-lived duo – Decksandrumsandrockandroll was their only full-length album release – but they were ambitious collaborators, and did manage something of an impact during their brief stay on the charts.

The album opens with the first hit Take California, a long and repetitive piece built around a fairly uninspiring sample. Then next is Velvet Pants – I hadn’t realised until listening this time around that I actually own the US version, which has a slightly different track listing to the UK one, so a track is missing here. Maybe that’s not such a bad thing. As with the first track, it drags somewhat, but there’s a pleasant feel all the way through.

Better? might be a short track, but it’s far from a filler – it’s a sweet little jazzy track that fits nicely in between the bigger pieces. The UK version of the album then gets Oh Yeah? while the US version introduces De La Soul in a collaboration that seems to have been manned by Prince of all people – 360° (Oh Yeah?) is next, as an undemanding De La Soul vocal appears over the original track.

Oh, then Shirley Bassey turns up, delivering the vocal on the 1997 hit History Repeating. You can tell that Propellerheads are clearly big James Bond fans, and possibly for the first time on this album, it’s really rather brilliant

This is not so true for Winning Style or Bang On!, the latter sounding like early-90s era Moby when he was having one of his less creative days. But this is, broadly, a hip hop album, and so the short beatboxing of A Number of Microphones is appropriate, although not entirely welcome.

Finally, we get the hit single, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, in glorious nine-and-a-half minute form. It’s huge, and absolutely every bit as good as the original. This is pretty much what Propellerheads their fifteen minutes of fame, and deservedly so. Anything else is going to feel like filler, and so pleasant though the gentle acid of Bigger? may be, it feels a little bit pointless too. Cominagetcha is nice enough too, but seems a little drifty and directionless.

Spybreak! was another single, which snuck in at the bottom end of the top 40 in 1997. Again, it’s far from bad, but it’s nothing particularly special, and it also owes a lot to the preceding single Take California. I’m starting to wonder now why I liked this album – it seems very bland now.

Sure enough, Jungle Brothers turn up for the closing track You Want it Back, and it’s nothing special either. Two decades on, this is, sadly, a rather disappointing effort all round.

The version of Decksandrumsandrockandroll that was reviewed is still available from the US version of Amazon here.

The Updated Top Twenty BRIT Award Artists

It’s really difficult to work out what the most successful BRIT Awards artists of all time are, so this took me several hours, and I’m still not too confident in the results. But anyway, here it is – an updated list of the top twenty artists at the BRIT Awards.

The number of wins and nominations are shown in brackets, and I’ve ranked the people who won them first higher on the list.

  1. Robbie Williams (13-12)
  2. Coldplay (9-17)
  3. Adele (9-3)
  4. Take That (8-10)
  5. U2 (7-19)
  6. Annie Lennox (7-5)
  7. One Direction (7-5)
  8. Prince (7-4)
  9. Arctic Monkeys (7-2)
  10. Oasis (6-12)
  11. David Bowie (6-8)
  12. Michael Jackson (6-2)
  13. Björk (5-5)
  14. Blur (5-12)
  15. Elton John (5-10)
  16. Paul Weller (5-4)
  17. Spice Girls (5-4)
  18. Phil Collins (4-6)
  19. Eminem (4-6)
  20. Ed Sheeran (4-6)

Just for the record, the next few are: R.E.M.Manic Street PreachersFoo FightersEmeli SandéThe BeatlesDidoGeorge MichaelKylie MinoguePet Shop Boys, and Beck.

NME Poll Winners 1952-1992 (Part One)

If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll know that we’ve spent the last few weeks working through the history of the NME Polls, from 1952 to 1992. It’s a long and complicated history, and one that pretty much encapsulates the first forty years of modern popular music in the UK. So as a side-step, it’s worth taking a couple of posts to look at them, award by award.

With such a complex history, it’s hard to trace the winners of a particular category through time, so I’ve taken a few liberties here. Essentially anything that seems to be roughly the same category has been treated as the same thing. Also, for the year ranges, there are a few missing years here and there, so for instance 1967-1970 could mean anything between 2 and 3 wins, but it definitely isn’t 4, as we have no information for the poll results from 1969, or even any meaningful confirmation that the poll took place.

Best and Worst Single, Video and Album Categories

Here are all the winners for specific singles, videos, and albums, including the wonderful “Best Dressed Album” (later “Best Dressed Sleeve”) award.

Best British Disc / Single

  • 1959 – Cliff Richard – Living Doll
  • 1960 – The Shadows – Apache
  • 1961 – John Leyton – Johnny Remember Me
  • 1962 – Frank Ifield – I Remember You
  • 1963 – The Beatles – She Loves You
  • 1964 – The Animals – The House of the Rising Sun
  • 1965 – The Rolling Stones – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
  • 1966 – The Beatles – Eleanor Rigby
  • 1968 – The Beatles – Hey Jude
  • 1971 – Mungo Jerry – In the Summertime
  • 1972 – George Harrison – My Sweet Lord
  • 1973 – Golden Earring – Radar Love (World) & The Who – 5.15 (British)
  • 1975 – Bad Company – Can’t Get Enough
  • 1976 – Thin Lizzy – The Boys are Back in Town
  • 1977 – Sex Pistols – God Save the Queen
  • 1978 – The Clash – (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais
  • 1979 – The Specials – Gangsters
  • 1980 – The Jam – Going Underground
  • 1981 – The Specials – Ghost Town
  • 1982 – The Jam – Town Called Malice
  • 1983 – New Order – Blue Monday
  • 1984 – Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Relax
  • 1985 – The Jesus and Mary Chain – Never Understand
  • 1986 – The Smiths – Panic
  • 1987 – Prince – Sign O The Times
  • 1988 – The House of Love – Destroy the Heart
  • 1989 – The Stone Roses – Fool’s Gold
  • 1990 – The Charlatans – The Only One I Know
  • 1991 – Nirvana – Smells Like Teen Spirit
  • 1992 – Suede – The Drowners

Best Dance Record

  • 1982 – Wham! – Young Guns (Go for It)
  • 1986 – Cameo – Word Up
  • 1987 – M/A/R/R/S – Pump Up the Volume
  • 1989 – Happy Mondays – WFL

Worst Record

  • 1991 – Bryan Adams – Everything I Do (I Do It for You)
  • 1992 – The Shamen – Ebeneezer Goode

Best Music Video

  • 1982 – Madness – House of Fun
  • 1983 – Michael Jackson – Thriller
  • 1984 – Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Two Tribes
  • 1985 – Talking Heads – Road to Nowhere

Best Long Player / Album

  • 1971 – The Beatles – Let it Be
  • 1972 – T. Rex – Electric Warrior & John Lennon – Imagine (tie)
  • 1973 – Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon
  • 1975 – Rod Stewart – Smiler
  • 1976 – Led Zeppelin – The Song Remains the Same
  • 1977 – Sex Pistols – Never Mind the Bollocks
  • 1978 – The Jam – All Mod Cons
  • 1979 – The Jam – Setting Sons
  • 1980 – The Jam – Sound Affects
  • 1981 – Echo and the Bunnymen – Heaven Up Here
  • 1982 – The Jam – The Gift
  • 1983 – Elvis Costello – Punch the Clock
  • 1984 – Cocteau Twins – Treasure
  • 1985 – The Smiths – Meat is Murder
  • 1986 – The Smiths – The Queen is Dead
  • 1987 – The Smiths – Strangeways Here We Come
  • 1988 – R.E.M. – Green
  • 1989 – The Stone Roses – The Stone Roses
  • 1990 – Happy Mondays – Pills ‘n’ Thrills and Bellyaches
  • 1991 – Primal Scream – Screamadelica
  • 1992 – R.E.M. – Automatic for the People

Best Dressed Album / Sleeve

  • 1973 – Yes – Yessongs
  • 1975 – Yes – Relayer
  • 1976 – Led Zeppelin – The Song Remains the Same
  • 1978 – The Rolling Stones – Some Girls
  • 1980 – The Jam – Sound Affects
  • 1981 – Echo and the Bunnymen – Heaven Up Here
  • 1982 – Siouxsie and the Banshees – A Kiss in the Dreamhouse
  • 1983 – New Order – Power, Corruption and Lies
  • 1984 – Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Welcome to the Pleasuredome
  • 1985 – The Pogues – Rum, Sodomy and the Lash

Media Categories

The group of media awards, for radio, TV, films, and venues, are particularly fascinating, since other award ceremonies rarely have anything like this.

Best Disc Jockey

  • 1955-1957 – Jack Jackson
  • 1958-1959 – Pete Murray
  • 1960-1963 – David Jacobs
  • 1965-1972 – Jimmy Savile
  • 1973 – John Peel
  • 1975 – Noel Edmonds
  • 1976-1980 – John Peel

Best Music Radio Show

  • 1975-1976 – Alan Freeman
  • 1977-1992 – John Peel

Best TV Show

  • 1965-1972 – Top of the Pops
  • 1973-1977 – The Old Grey Whistle Test
  • 1978 – Revolver
  • 1979 – Fawlty Towers
  • 1980 – Not the Nine O’Clock News
  • 1981 – Coronation Street
  • 1982 – The Young Ones
  • 1983-1984 – The Tube
  • 1985 – The Old Grey Whistle Test
  • 1986 – The Singing Detective
  • 1987-1988 – Brookside
  • 1989 – Blackadder
  • 1990-1991 – Vic Reeves’ Big Night Out
  • 1992 – Have I Got News for You

Best Film

  • 1978 – Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  • 1979 – Quadrophenia
  • 1980 – The Elephant Man
  • 1981 – Gregory’s Girl
  • 1982 – E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
  • 1983 – Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
  • 1984 – Nineteen Eighty-Four
  • 1985 – Letter to Brezhnev
  • 1986 – Mona Lisa
  • 1987 – Angel Heart
  • 1988 – A Fish Called Wanda
  • 1989 – Dead Poets’ Society
  • 1990 – Wild at Heart
  • 1991 – The Silence of the Lambs
  • 1992 – Wayne’s World

Best Club / Venue

  • 1986 – Town and Country Club
  • 1989 – The Haçienda
  • 1990-1992 – Town and Country Club

Best Fashion Item

  • 1989 – Flares
  • 1990-1992 – Dr. Marten Boots

People Categories

In later years, the poll included some odd nominations for people, often outside of the world of music, which provide an interesting window on the past.

Most Wonderful Human Being

  • 1976-1977 – Johnny Rotten
  • 1978 – Sid Vicious
  • 1979 – John Peel
  • 1980-1983 – Paul Weller
  • 1984 – Arthur Scargill
  • 1985 – Bob Geldof
  • 1986-1988 – Morrissey

Klutz/Prat/Creep/Bastard of the Year

  • 1975 – Steve Harley
  • 1977 – Freddie Mercury
  • 1978 – John Travolta
  • 1979 – Gary Numan
  • 1980 – Margaret Thatcher
  • 1981 – Adam Ant
  • 1982-1989 – Margaret Thatcher
  • 1990-1991 – Saddam Hussein
  • 1992 – John Major

Best Dressed Male

  • 1979 – Gary Numan
  • 1980 – Adam Ant
  • 1981 – Michael Foot
  • 1982 – Paul Weller
  • 1983 – David Bowie
  • 1984 – Paul Weller
  • 1985 – Morrissey

Best Dressed Female

  • 1982-1983 – Siouxsie Sioux

Worst Dressed Person

  • 1985 – Bob Geldof

Most missed Dead Person

  • 1976 – Jimi Hendrix
  • 1981 – John Lennon

Political and Real World Categories

These are some of the oddest categories – I’m honestly not sure what the “Hype of the Year” category was all about, but it is interesting to see just what was catching people’s eyes at the time.

Event of the Year

  • 1977 – Death of Elvis Presley
  • 1980 – Death of John Lennon
  • 1982 – The Jam Split
  • 1986 – 1986 FIFA World Cup
  • 1987 – Nuclear Agreement
  • 1988 – Nelson Mandela’s Birthday Bash
  • 1989 – Revolution in Eastern Europe
  • 1990 – Margaret Thatcher’s Resignation
  • 1991 – The release of the hostages
  • 1992 – Bill Clinton winning the US election

Pin-Up/Sex SYmbol/Object of Desire

  • 1978 – Debbie Harry
  • 1986 – Joanne Whalley
  • 1988-1989 – Wendy James
  • 1990 – Betty Boo
  • 1991-1992 – Toni Halliday

Bad News of the Year

  • 1987 – Another Conservative Victory at the General Election
  • 1988 – US Election Result

Hype of the Year

  • 1985 – The Jesus and Mary Chain
  • 1989 – Batman
  • 1990 – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
  • 1992 – Madonna – Sex

That concludes part one of the summary of NME Poll Winners. Next week, we’ll look at the artist categories.

NME Poll Winners – The 1980s

Throughout the 1980s, the NME Poll Winners suffered without an annual ceremony where they could drink lots and vomit on the politicians of the day. Overshadowed by the more popular BPI Awards and British Rock & Pop Awards, it’s notable by the late eighties that contemporary pop has been eschewed altogether by NME’s readership.

Oh, and you might enjoy the slightly questionable choices for “human being of the year”…

1980

  • Best Group: The Jam
  • Best New Act: UB40
  • Best Male Singer: Paul Weller
  • Best Guitarist: Paul Weller
  • Best Drummer: Rick Buckler
  • Best Songwriter: Paul Weller
  • Best Bassist: Bruce Foxton
  • Best Keyboardist: Dave Greenfield
  • Best Other Instrumentalist: Saxa
  • Best Single: The Jam, for Going Underground
  • Best Album: The Jam, for Sound Affects
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: The Jam, for Sound Affects
  • Best Disc Jockey: John Peel
  • Best Dressed Person: Adam Ant
  • Haircut of the Year: Eugene Reynolds
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Paul Weller
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Event of the Year: Death of John Lennon
  • TV Programme: Not the Nine O’Clock News
  • Movie of the Year: The Elephant Man

1981

  • Best Group: The Jam
  • Best New Act: Altered Images
  • Most Missed Person: John Lennon
  • Best Songwriter: Paul Weller
  • Best Female Singer: Siouxsie Sioux
  • Best Male Singer: David Bowie
  • Best Single: The Specials, for Ghost Town
  • Best LP: Echo and the Bunnymen, for Heaven Up Here
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: Echo and the Bunnymen, for Heaven Up Here
  • Best Guitarist: Paul Weller
  • Best Bassist: Bruce Foxton
  • Best Drummer: Rick Buckler
  • Best Keyboardist: Dave Greenfield
  • Best TV Programme: Coronation Street
  • Best Radio Show: John Peel
  • Best Film: Gregory’s Girl
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Paul Weller
  • Best Dressed Person: Michael Foot
  • Creep of the Year: Adam Ant*

* The NME website says “Adam Andy” but I suspect this must be a typo – please correct me if you disagree!

1982

  • Best Group: The Jam
  • Best Male Singer: Paul Weller
  • Best Female Singer: Siouxsie Sioux
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Paul Weller
  • Best Songwriter: Paul Weller
  • Best Single: The Jam, for Town Called Malice
  • Best Longplayer: The Jam, for The Gift
  • Best Live Act: The Jam
  • Best Dancefloor Favourite: Wham!, for Young Guns (Go for It)
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: Siouxsie and the Banshees – A Kiss in the Dreamhouse
  • Event of the Year: The Jam Split
  • Best Dressed Male: Paul Weller
  • Best Dressed Female: Siouxsie Sioux
  • Best Haircut: Paul Weller
  • Best Electronics: Vince Clarke
  • Best Guitarist: Paul Weller
  • Best Bassist: Bruce Foxton
  • Best Drummer: Rick Buckler
  • Best Miscellaneous Instrument: The Emerald Express, Violin
  • Best Radio Show: John Peel
  • Best Music Video: Madness, for House of Fun
  • Best TV Show: The Young Ones
  • Best Film: E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

1983

  • Best Group: New Order
  • Best New Act: The Smiths
  • Best Dressed Female: Siouxsie Sioux
  • Female Singer: Siouxsie Sioux
  • Songwriter: Elvis Costello
  • Male Singer: David Bowie
  • Best Dressed Male: David Bowie
  • Best Long Player: Elvis Costello, for Punch the Clock
  • Best Single: New Order, for Blue Monday
  • Best Film: Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
  • Best Promo Video: Michael Jackson, for Thriller
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Paul Weller
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • TV Show: The Tube
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: New Order, for Power, Corruption and Lies
  • Best Radio Programme: John Peel
  • Best Guitarist: The Edge
  • Best Drummer: Budgie
  • Best Miscellaneous Musician: The TKO Horns
  • Best Bassist: Peter Hook
  • Best Keyboardist: Steve Nieve

1984

  • Best Group: The Smiths
  • Best New Act: Bronski Beat
  • Best Reggae Act: Smiley Culture
  • Best Soul Act: Womack & Womack
  • Best TV Show: The Tube
  • Best Radio Show: John Peel
  • Best Single: Frankie Goes to Hollywood, for Relax
  • Best LP: Cocteau Twins, for Treasure
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: Frankie Goes to Hollywood, for Welcome to the Pleasuredome
  • Promo Video: Frankie Goes to Hollywood, for Two Tribes
  • Best Film: Nineteen Eighty-Four
  • Best Male Singer: Bono
  • Best Songwriter: Morrissey / Johnny Marr
  • Best Female Singer: Elizabeth Fraser
  • Best Instrumentalist: Johnny Marr
  • Best Dressed Person: Paul Weller
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Arthur Scargill

1985

  • Best Group: The Smiths
  • Best New Act: The Jesus and Mary Chain
  • Best Male Singer: Morrissey
  • Best Female Singer: Elizabeth Fraser
  • Best Songwriter: Morrissey / Johnny Marr
  • Best Single: The Jesus and Mary Chain, for Never Understand
  • LP of the Year: The Smiths, for Meat is Murder
  • Best Soul/Funk Band: Cameo
  • Best Reggae Act: UB40
  • Best Live Act: The Pogues
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Bob Geldof
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Best Dressed: Morrissey
  • Worst Dressed: Bob Geldof
  • Best Haircut: Morrissey
  • Worst Haircut: Feargal Sharkey
  • Biggest Mouth: Bob Geldof
  • Best Film: Letter to Brezhnev
  • Best TV Programme: The Old Grey Whistle Test
  • Best Radio Show: John Peel
  • Best Video: Talking Heads, for Road to Nowhere
  • Best Dressed Sleeve: The Pogues, for Rum, Sodomy and the Lash
  • Best Hype: The Jesus and Mary Chain

1986

  • Best Single: The Smiths, for Panic
  • Best LP: The Smiths, for The Queen is Dead
  • Best Male Singer: Morrissey
  • Best Female Singer: Elizabeth Fraser
  • Best Group: The Smiths
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Morrissey
  • Best Club/Venue: Town & Country Club
  • Best Dance Record: Cameo, for Word Up
  • Threat of the Year: AIDS
  • Sex Symbol: Joanne Whalley
  • Event of the Year: 1986 FIFA World Cup
  • Best Film: Mona Lisa
  • Best TV Show: The Singing Detective
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Best New Music: The Housemartins
  • Best Radio Show: John Peel

1987

  • Best Group: The Smiths
  • Best Single: Prince, for Sign O The Times
  • Best LP: The Smiths, for Strangeways Here We Come
  • Male Singer: Morrissey
  • Best Female Singer: Suzanne Vega
  • Best New Act: The Proclaimers
  • Best Dance Record: M/A/R/R/S, for Pump Up the Volume
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Morrissey
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher
  • Bad News of the Year: Another Conservative Victory at the General Election
  • Safe Sex: Morrissey
  • Radio: John Peel
  • Best TV Programme: Brookside
  • Best Film: Angel Heart
  • Event of the Year: Nuclear Agreement

1988

  • Best Band: The Wedding Present
  • Solo Artist: Morrissey
  • Best New Band/Act: The House of Love
  • Best Single: The House of Love, for Destroy the Heart
  • Best LP: R.E.M., for Green
  • Best TV Show: Brookside
  • Ugly Bastard of the Year: Bros (collective award)
  • Object of Desire of the Year: Wendy James
  • Film of the Year: A Fish Called Wanda
  • Favourite NME Cover of 1988: Morrissey
  • Best Night Out: The Wedding Present
  • Radio Show of the Year: John Peel
  • Stimulant of the Year: Acid
  • Event of the Year: Nelson Mandela‘s Birthday Bash
  • Bad News of the Year: US Election Result
  • Most Wonderful Human Being: Morrissey
  • Creep of the Year: Margaret Thatcher

1989

  • Band of the Year: The Stone Roses
  • LP of the Year: The Stone Roses, for The Stone Roses
  • Single of the Year: The Stone Roses, for Fool’s Gold
  • Best New Band/Artist: The Stone Roses
  • Best Solo Artist: Morrissey
  • Best Dance Record: Happy Mondays, for WFL
  • Hype of the Year: Batman
  • Object of Desire: Wendy James
  • Radio Show: John Peel
  • TV Show: Blackadder
  • Film of the Year: Dead Poets’ Society
  • Fashion of the Year: Flares
  • Club/Venue of the Year: The Haçienda
  • Event of the Year (Music): Reading Festival
  • Event of the Year (Real Life): Revolution in Eastern Europe
  • Bastard of the Year: Margaret Thatcher

See also

Hot Chip – The Warning

Every once in a while, an artist’s first album will be completely ignored by the public at large, and it’s only their second that gets any attention. So it is with Hot Chip, whose wonderfully mellow debut Coming on Strong appeared in 2004, but was instantly forgotten.

So in 2006, they reappeared, satisfactorily reinvented, with The Warning, which, for the most part, is an extremely good album. In fact, its main problem is that it opens with the dreadful Careful. If they were trying to alienate the people who had bought their first album, or perhaps to scare anyone who thought this might be an album worth purchasing, this would have been an unabashed success. But it wasn’t then, and it still isn’t now – it’s just plain bad.

Fortunately, Boy from School (or, to give it its full album title, And I Was a Boy from School) comes next, and lifts the mood immediately. Perhaps for the first time in their career – and definitely not for the last time – they had come up with something quite exceptional. Even if there were nothing else on here, this album would be worth buying for the second track alone.

But there is, and third single Colours comes next, harking back a little more to the mood of their first release. It isn’t really traditionally catchy, but you will almost certainly find yourself singing along by the second or third chorus.

With songs as good as these on their breaking release, it isn’t difficult to see how Hot Chip have come to be quickly regarded as both groundbreaking and legendary.

Even their quirkier side is far from absent, as lead single and live favourite Over and Over commences with the words, “laid back? I’ll give you laid back,” which I’ve always imagined (admittedly with absolutely zero justification) must be a reaction to the press reviews of Coming on Strong. And the “K-I-S-S-I-N-G” part is, of course hilarious and brilliant at the same time.

The disco stylings of (Just Like We) Breakdown follow, before the daft but entirely lovely Tchaparian, complete with bendy synth sounds, a heavy Prince influence, and sampled cats (OK, some of that may not be true, but I hope it is).

Aside from the first track, the worst this album gets is when it’s just “nice”. Again, drawing on their experience with the debut release, Look After Me is nice. Actually, it’s very nice – I think my expectations were just a little high after the rest of the songs on here.

For a couple of songs, we find ourselves very much back in the territory of the debut release – very silly songs with extremely “laid back” music. The title track warns us that Hot Chip will break our legs, and then the livelier Arrest Yourself returns to the funkier 1980s influences. So Glad to See You presents us with a vocoder vocal and a slightly too uptempo drum pattern for its own good.

Picking things up again right at the end is the adorable final track No Fit State. This is what you’re looking for from Hot Chip – a catchy, silly, and memorable pop song, with retro synth lines and superficially awkward vocals. What a wonderful way to finish the album.

Except it isn’t – hidden bonus track Won’t Wash appears right at the end, a pleasant piece with wind chimes and gentle strumming, closing things off for good.

Their next release, by far their most successful, Made in the Dark, would see them enjoying worldwide success nearly a decade after their original formation, but was nowhere near as accomplished as this. It may not be their debut, but The Warning is an extremely good album.

You can still find The Warning at all major retailers.