Music for the Masses 40 – 14 May 2005

This was the last ever Music for the Masses, just a little over a decade ago, and it would go out with nothing but a sombre wave on the webcam, ten minutes before the end. Over the preceding five years, I had immensely enjoyed doing the show, and would spend another eight years or so wondering how to recapture those times. Eventually, it was reincarnated in the shape of the blog you’re reading today.

The last track had to be, of course, the fantastic Sweet Harmony by The Beloved.

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Show 40: Sat 14 May 2005, from 6:00pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: Everything But The Girl.

  • Portishead – Glory Box
  • Basement Jaxx – Where’s Your Head At
  • Kings Have Long Arms feat. Phil Oakey – Rock & Roll is Dead
  • Sohodolls – Prince Harry
  • Everything But The Girl – Missing (CL McSpadden Powerhouse Mix)
  • Underworld – Pearl’s Girl
  • Client – Don’t Call Me Baby
  • Saint Etienne – Only Love Can Break Your Heart
  • Garbage – The World is Not Enough
  • Everything But The Girl – Walking Wounded
  • Wolfsheim – Kein Zurück (Live) [The Live Bit]
  • Vic Twenty – Wrong
  • Moby – Raining Again
  • Luke Slater – I Can Complete You
  • Röyksopp – Poor Leno
  • Everything But The Girl – Blame
  • Jean Michel Jarre – Oxygène (Part 2)
  • Goldfrapp – Tiptoe [Electromix]
  • Jolly Music – Radio Jolly (ADULT Remix) [Electromix]
  • Massive Attack – Butterfly Caught (Paul Daley Remix) [Electromix]
  • Alpinestars – Green Raven Blonde
  • The Beloved – Sweet Harmony (Live the Dream Remix)

The Electromix feature from this show still exists, and will be included on a future Playlist for stowaways.

Music for the Masses 32 – 16 February 2005

Always keen to try new features on the show, the Spring term had seen my try out the Unsigned Act feature, where I would try to give a new or unsigned artist a bit of free airtime, with no strings attached (well, except they had to be good). In the end, it was a bit of a failure, as pretty much everyone who showed an interest failed to submit anything on time. One of the few exceptions was Blue Swan, whom we also covered here on the blog.

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Show 32: Wed 16 Feb 2005, from 6:05pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: Faithless.

  • BT – Love, Peace and Grease
  • Conjure One – Centre of the Sun (29 Palms Remix)
  • Dave Gahan – I Need You
  • Mirwais – Naïve Song
  • Leftfield – Afro-Left
  • Faithless – Don’t Leave
  • Bomb the Bass – Winter in July
  • Echoboy – Lately Lonely
  • Groove Armada – At the River (Live)
  • Blue Swan – Black Widow [Unsigned Act]
  • Jollymusic feat. Erlend Øye – Talco Uno
  • Faithless feat. Dido – One Step Too Far
  • Electribe 101 – Talkin’ with Myself 98 (Beloved Mix)
  • Vic Twenty – Sugar Me
  • Moby – Left Me Up
  • Étienne de Crécy – Am I Wrong?
  • Yazoo – Don’t Go
  • Faithless – Mass Destruction
  • Deep Dish – Stranded
  • Goldfrapp – Utopia

Music for the Masses 29 – 6 December 2004

Show 29 was the last before the Christmas break in 2004, and while that may be a little off-season at the time of posting, it inevitably had a bit of a festive theme, with Erasure – also starring as the artist of the week – turning up on the playlist with She Won’t Be Home and other wintry hits from Pet Shop Boys and Saint Etienne.

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Show 29: Mon 6 Dec 2004, from 6:05pm-8:00pm

Broadcast on LSR FM, online only. Artist of the week: Erasure.

  • Bomb the Bass – Darkheart
  • The Postal Service – Recycled Air
  • Sohodolls – Trash the Rental (Demo)
  • Ladytron – Playgirl
  • Depeche Mode – Photographic (Rex the Dog Dubb Mix)
  • Erasure – Sono Luminus
  • Alpinestars – Burning Up
  • Pet Shop Boys – It Doesn’t Often Snow at Christmas
  • Lemon Jelly – Stay with You
  • Espiritu – You Don’t Get Me
  • Jean Michel Jarre – Chronologie (Part 6)
  • Andy Pickford – Oblivion
  • Erasure – She Won’t Be Home
  • Piney Gir – Girl
  • Empire State Human – Little Alfie
  • Way Out West – Ajare 2
  • Jolly Music feat. Erlend Øye – Talco Uno
  • Client – In the Back of Your Car
  • Delerium – Wisdom
  • Peach – Hush
  • Erasure – Breathe
  • Sparks – The Calm Before the Storm
  • Saint Etienne – I Was Born on Christmas Day

Chart for stowaways – 25 April 2015

Here are the top 10 singles for this week:

  1. MG – Europa Hymn
  2. Étienne de Crécy – Hashtag My Ass
  3. VCMG – EP3 – Aftermaths
  4. Erlend Øye – La prima estate
  5. Étienne de Crécy feat. Pos & Dave – Wtf
  6. Röyksopp – I Had This Thing
  7. Shit Robot feat. Nancy Whang – Do That Dance
  8. VCMG – EP2 – Single Blip
  9. Jolly Music – Radio Jolly
  10. Dubstar – Cathedral Park

Erlend Øye / Various Artists – DJ-Kicks

From Kings of Convenience to The Whitest Boy Alive to his own solo work, with vocals for Röyksopp and many others, Erlend Øye is a very busy man indeed. The year after his brilliant solo album Unrest, he released a mix compilation which is quite unlike any other, one which deserves the right to be regarded as an album in its own right.

Erlend Øye‘s DJ-Kicks compilation kicks off with the warm crackle of vinyl and the sound of Jürgen Paape‘s So Weit Wie Noch Nie, a lovely gentle piece of electronic music with a touch of acoustic guitar and a vocal from way back when. The first signs of anything being amiss come at the end, as Øye mixes in the backing from his own Sheltered Life with an acapella version of It’s a Fine Day. Clearly his DJ style is eccentric to say the least.

This mixes into the Kings of Convenience remix of Cornelius‘s Drop, which sounds entirely like a Kings of Convenience track but sung in foreign, with its rhythmic acoustic guitars and gentle vocals. It’s got some extra beats and water noises too, but it’s altogether fantastic.

Next is the brilliant If I Ever Feel Better by Phoenix, mixed ingeniously by a vocal from Øye. I don’t often talk about Phoenix, because I’m never quite sure whether I actually like them, but this track is great. We then take a side step via Jolly Music‘s Radio Jolly mixed into Øye’s own Prego Amore, and then the quite incredible Rubicon by Alan Braxe and Fred Falke.

You might find it difficult to know what to make of Avenue D‘s 2D2F. I can’t help but think it’s brilliant, but it is just a touch on the vulgar side. Maybe you just need to make your own mind up on this one.

With a duration of little more than fifty minutes, the tracks come thick and fast, with The Rapture‘s brilliant I Need Your Love mixing via Lattialla Taas by Uusi Fantasia with a new rendition of Venus as its vocal into Justus Köhncke‘s 2 After 909, and finally Erlend Øye‘s then new single The Black Keys Work. If at any point you feel the need to breathe, you’ll just have to press pause for yourself.

With the dark backing of something from the early 1990s, Jackmate‘s Airraid turns up, sounding totally brilliant, and taking the album into slightly deeper house territory. Then Silicone Soul‘s remix of Poor Leno by Röyksopp meets There is a Light That Never Goes Out for an odd, if compelling soundclash.

The last few tracks steadily bring the tempo back down – Skateboard‘s Metal Chix (augmented with a vocal of Always on My Mind) is full of flanged synths and driving beats, but it mixes into Villalobos‘s extremely chilled (and largely backwards) Dexter, which in turn leads into Minizza‘s inventive pop sound with their version of Winning a Battle, Losing the War.

Finally, the mix comes to a close with Morgan Geist‘s Lullaby, now with another added vocal from Erlend Øye, this time singing A Place in My Heart. It’s much more laid back than some of its predecessors, but like every live performance it leaves you slightly with the feeling that the night will last forever. Quite exceptional.

This edition of DJ-Kicks seems to have become somewhat difficult to find, but there are still copies floating around second hand, such as from here.

Erlend Øye – Unrest

Most people will have come across Erlend Øye one of two ways. Either they enjoyed the acoustic pop of Kings of Convenience, or they’ll have been blown away (as everyone was) by Röyksopp‘s debut Melody AM. Like me, they will probably have spotted his solo CD Unrest on the shelves without having heard anything off it, and thought “ooh, that sounds fun.”

It is. All the best stories involve a journey, either mental or physical, and this is no exception. According to the back cover, Erlend travelled to ten different cities across Europe and the USA working with local producers to create this quite delightful album. You can almost feel the spirit of the journey pulsing through the entire CD.

The album is an odd contrast of travel and homeliness (in the British sense), and acoustic songwriting accompanied by gentle electronica backing. Although Norwegian, Øye lives in Berlin, and this album feels very much how I would expect something written by a foreigner in the German capital to be. It’s a city I know well, having lived there for a very happy few months around the time this album was released.

To me, his dry vocal style with his ingenious lyric writing somehow keeps the album grounded, reflecting Berlin’s sometimes surprising welcoming side. The occasionally obscure and unusual synth sounds represent the odder, more bizarre side of the city, such as when you round a corner to see a Trabi attached half way up a building, or a lonely standing remnant of the Berlin Wall in the middle of nowhere.

Unrest opens with Ghost Trains, produced by Morgan Geist, before launching into Sheltered Life, the second single, which is great, but was also considerably improved by its single version. Throughout the album, the only really common theme that I can find is a slight unease – the protagonist in each song seems to be struggling to find his place. Something I think a lot of people will identify with, and maybe that’s where the true genius of this album lies.

My personal favourite moments are the album’s centrepoints, Every Party (Has a Winner and a Loser) and The Athlete, recorded respectively in Barcelona and Rennes (incidentally, after a few years living in the USA I find the urge to suffix these cities with the country they’re in pretty hard to resist!)

The odd collaborations continue. The first single Sudden Rush was curiously accompanied by a video directed by Jarvis Cocker off of Sheffield. Bonkers Italian electro act Jolly Music turn up, with an uncharacteristically sane production on Prego Amore. And on it goes.

Commercially, I don’t think this album can exactly be regarded a success, but it is without a doubt one of the best albums that I own. For further listening, you’ll probably want to track down the Sheltered Life single, and download The Black Keys Work, before finally working up to his brilliant DJ Kicks compilation.

And please don’t ask me to try and pronounce his name.

Unrest is available through iTunes, Amazon.com, and probably plenty of other places too.