Ivor Novello Awards Winners 1956-2018 (Part Two)

Last week, we ran through the 63-year history of the Ivor Novello Awards, and listed all the winners in the Song and Album categories, and the special and one-off awards. Let’s finish that journey now, starting with the Artist Award categories.

Artist Awards

Outstanding Services to British Music

  • 1956 – Jack Payne
  • 1957 – A.P. Mantovani
  • 1958 – Ted Heath
  • 1959 – Billy Cotton
  • 1960 – Lionel Bart
  • 1961 – Eric Maschwitz
  • 1962 – Cliff Richard, Jet Harris, Hank Marvin, Tony Meehan and Bruce Welch
  • 1963 – Lawrence Wright
  • 1964 – Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr
  • 1965 – Paddy Roberts
  • 1966 – BBC TV (for the production of the series ‘A Song For Europe’)
  • 1967 – Joe Loss
  • 1968 – Alan Herbert
  • 1969 – Andrew Gold
  • 1970 – Noel Coward
  • 1971 – Cliff Richard
  • 1972 – Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1973 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1974 – Tolchard Evans
  • 1975 – Vera Lynn
  • 1976 – Dick James
  • 1977 – Adrian Boult
  • 1978 – Harry Mortimer
  • 1979 – George Martin
  • 1980 – Robert Mayer
  • 1981 – William Walton
  • 1982 – Lennox Berkeley
  • 1984 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1985 – Michael Tippett
  • 1986 – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1987 – Yehudi Menuhin
  • 1988 – David Heneker
  • 1989 – Paul McCartney
  • 1990 – Mick Avory, Dave Davies, Ray Davies, Ian Gibbons and Jim Rodford
  • 1991 – Robert Farnon
  • 1996 – Jeff Lynne

Songwriter of the Year

  • 1970 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1971 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1972 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1973 – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1974 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1975 – Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • 1976 – Wayne Bickerton and Tony Waddington
  • 1977 – Biddu
  • 1978 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1979 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1980 – Ben Findon
  • 1981 – Ben Findon
  • 1982 – Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni
  • 1983 – Andy Hill
  • 1984 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1985 – George Michael
  • 1986 – Roland Orzabal
  • 1987 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1988 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1989 – George Michael and Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman (presented jointly)
  • 1990 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1991 – Phil Collins
  • 1992 – Mick Hucknall
  • 1993 – Colin Angus and Richard West
  • 1994 – Gary Barlow
  • 1995 – Tony Mortimer
  • 1996 – Damon Albarn, Graham Coxon, Alex James, Dave Rowntree and Noel Gallagher (presented jointly)
  • 1997 – George Michael
  • 1998 – Richard Ashcroft
  • 1999 – Guy Chambers and Robbie Williams
  • 2000 – Fran Healy
  • 2001 – Craig David and Mark Hill
  • 2002 – Dido Armstrong
  • 2003 – Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion and Chris Martin
  • 2004 – Ed Graham, Dan Hawkins, Justin Hawkins and Frankie Poullain
  • 2005 – Tom Chaplin, Richard Hughes and Tim Rice-Oxley
  • 2006 – Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett
  • 2007 – Dan Gillespie Sells, Ciaran Jeremiah, Kevin Jeremiah, Richard Jones and Paul Stewart
  • 2008 – Mika
  • 2009 – Eg White
  • 2010 – Lily Allen and Greg Kurstin
  • 2011 – Ben Drew
  • 2012 – Adele Adkins
  • 2013 – Calvin Harris
  • 2014 – Tom Odell
  • 2015 – Ed Sheeran
  • 2016 – Adele
  • 2017 – Skepta
  • 2018 – Ed Sheeran

PRS for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music

  • 1977 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1979 – Jeff Lynne
  • 1981 – John Lennon
  • 1982 – Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Kenney Jones, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend
  • 1983 – Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford
  • 1984 – Andy Brown, Peter Kircher, Alan Lancaster, Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi
  • 1985 – Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, John Lodge, Patrick Moraz and Ray Thomas
  • 1986 – Elton John
  • 1987 – John Deacon, Freddie Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor
  • 1988 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1989 – Mark Knopfler and John Illsley
  • 1990 – David Bowie
  • 1991 – Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and Bill Wyman
  • 1992 – David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters and Richard Wright
  • 1993 – Bernie Calvert, Allan Clarke, Bobby Elliott, Tony Hicks, Graham Nash and Terry Sylvester
  • 1994 – Tim Rice
  • 1995 – Lonnie Donegan
  • 1996 – Kenney Jones, Ronnie Lane, Steve Marriott and Ian McLagan
  • 1997 – Elvis Costello
  • 1998 – Morrissey
  • 1999 – Chrissie Hynde
  • 2000 – Chris Lowe and Neil Tennant
  • 2001 – Topper Headon, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon and Joe Strummer
  • 2002 – Kate Bush
  • 2003 – Bryan Ferry
  • 2004 – Errol Brown
  • 2005 – Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes, Andy Taylor, John Taylor and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Ray Davies
  • 2007 – Norman Cook
  • 2008 – Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook
  • 2009 – Robert Del Naja, Grant Marshall and Andrew Vowles
  • 2010 – Trevor Horn
  • 2011 – Paul Rodgers
  • 2012 – Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Mark Owen and Robbie Williams
  • 2013 – Justin Hayward
  • 2014 – Jeff Beck
  • 2015 – Boy George
  • 2016 – Geoff Barrow, Beth Gibbons and Adrian Utley
  • 2017 – Anne Dudley
  • 2018 – Billy Bragg

International Achievement

  • 1970 – Tom Jones
  • 1980 – Paul McCartney
  • 1991 – Albert Hammond
  • 1992 – Bernie Taupin
  • 1993 – Rod Temperton
  • 1994 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 1997 – Noel Hogan and Dolores O’Riordan
  • 1998 – Enya, Nicky Ryan and Roma Ryan
  • 1999 – Martin Gore
  • 2001 – Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris, Nicko McBrain, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith
  • 2002 – Sting
  • 2003 – Astro, James Brown, Ali Campbell, Robin Campbell, Earl Falconer, Norman Hassan, Brian Travers and Michael Virtue
  • 2004 – Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O’Brien, Phil Selway and Thom Yorke
  • 2005 – Robert Smith
  • 2006 – Ian Anderson
  • 2008 – Phil Collins
  • 2010 – Imogen Heap
  • 2011 – Matthew Bellamy, Dominic Howard and Christopher Wolstenholme
  • 2013 – Gavin Rossdale
  • 2014 – Ted Dwane, Ben Lovett, Winston Marshall and Marcus Mumford
  • 2016 – Wayne Hector
  • 2017 – Florence Welch
  • 2018 – Billy Ocean

Outstanding Contribution to British Musical Theatre

  • 1994 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1996 – Cameron Mackintosh

Lifetime Achievement

  • 1980 – Edgar Yipsel Harburg and Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1983 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1989 – Cliff Richard
  • 1992 – Eric Clapton
  • 1993 – George Shearing
  • 1994 – Ron Goodwin
  • 1995 – Van Morrison
  • 1997 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1999 – Rod Stewart
  • 2001 – Pete Townshend
  • 2007 – Peter Gabriel
  • 2008 – David Gilmour
  • 2010 – Paul Weller
  • 2012 – Mark Knopfler
  • 2014 – Christine McVie
  • 2015 – Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne and Bill Ward
  • 2016 – Damon Albarn
  • 2017 – Nitin Sawhney

The Jimmy Kennedy Award

  • 1985 – Tommie Connor
  • 1986 – Lionel Bart
  • 1987 – Hugh Charles
  • 1988 – Norman Newell
  • 1989 – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1990 – Herbert Kretzmer
  • 1991 – John Barry
  • 1992 – Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • 1993 – Les Reed
  • 1994 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1995 – Don Black
  • 1996 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1997 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1998 – Barry Mason
  • 1999 – Peter Callander and Mitch Murray
  • 2000 – Geoff Stephens

Outstanding Song Collection

  • 1993 – Marcella Detroit, Siobhan Fahey and Dave Stewart
  • 1994 – Paul Weller
  • 1995 – Elvis Costello
  • 1996 – Joan Armatrading
  • 1997 – Richard Thompson
  • 1998 – Johnny McElhone and Sharleen Spiteri
  • 1999 – Wallis Buchanan, Simon Katz, Jason Kay, Derrick McKenzie, Toby Smith and Stuart Zender
  • 2000 – Mike Barson, Mark Bedford, Chris Foreman, Cathal Smyth, Suggs, Lee Thompson and Daniel Woodgate
  • 2001 – Roy Wood
  • 2002 – Mick Hucknall
  • 2003 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 2004 – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley, Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 2005 – John Deacon, Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Philip Cunningham, Gillian Gilbert, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Bernard Sumner
  • 2007 – Yusuf Islam
  • 2008 – Gabrielle
  • 2009 – Vince Clarke
  • 2011 – Steve Winwood
  • 2012 – Gary Kemp
  • 2013 – Noel Gallagher
  • 2014 – Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons
  • 2015 – Albert Hammond
  • 2016 – Charlie Burchill, Derek Forbes, Jim Kerr and Mick MacNeil
  • 2017 – Pulp
  • 2018 – Cathy Dennis

PRS for Music Special International Award

  • 1999 – Hal David
  • 2000 – Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
  • 2001 – Stevie Wonder
  • 2002 – Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus
  • 2003 – Brian Wilson
  • 2004 – Lamont Dozier, Brian Holland and Eddie Holland
  • 2005 – Lou Reed
  • 2006 – Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff
  • 2007 – Quincy Jones
  • 2008 – Diane Warren
  • 2009 – Smokey Robinson
  • 2010 – Neil Sedaka
  • 2011 – Stephen Sondheim
  • 2012 – Jimmy Webb
  • 2013 – Randy Newman
  • 2014 – Nile Rodgers
  • 2015 – Paul Williams
  • 2016 – Bryan Adams
  • 2017 – Bill Withers
  • 2018 – Lionel Richie

BASCA Fellowship

  • 2006 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 2009 – David Ferguson
  • 2009 – Don Black
  • 2010 – Tim Rice
  • 2012 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 2015 – Annie Lennox

The Ivors Inspiration Award

  • 2008 – Jazzie B
  • 2009 – Edwyn Collins
  • 2010 – Johnny Marr
  • 2011 – Dizzee Rascal
  • 2012 – Siouxsie Sioux
  • 2013 – Marc Almond
  • 2014 – Jerry Dammers
  • 2015 – James Dean Bradfield, Sean Moore and Nicky Wire
  • 2016 – Mark Day, Paul Davis, Paul Ryder, Shaun Ryder and Gary Whelan
  • 2017 – Gary Numan
  • 2018 – Shane MacGowan

The Ivors Classical Music Award

  • 2003 – Boots of Lead – Simon Holt
  • 2004 – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2005 – John Tavener
  • 2006 – Harrison Birtwistle
  • 2007 – John Rutter
  • 2008 – Jonathan Dove
  • 2009 – James MacMillan
  • 2010 – Peter Maxwell Davies
  • 2011 – Michael Nyman
  • 2013 – Errollyn Wallen
  • 2014 – John McCabe
  • 2015 – Judith Weir
  • 2016 – Oliver Knussen
  • 2018 – Thea Musgrave

The Ivors Jazz Award

  • 2012 – Stan Tracey
  • 2017 – John Surman

Genre or Style-Specific Awards

Best Instrumental or Light Orchestral Work

  • 1956 – The Dam Busters – Eric Coates
  • 1957 – The Westminster Waltz – Robert Farnon
  • 1958 – Elizabethan Serenade – Ronald Binge
  • 1959 – Lingering Lovers – Ron Goodwin
  • 1960 – Windows of Parish – Tony Osborne
  • 1961 – Seashore – Robert Farnon
  • 1962 – The Secrets of the Seine – Tony Osborne
  • 1963 – Nicola – Steve Race
  • 1964 – Carlos’ Theme – Ivor Slaney
  • 1965 – Bombay Duckling – Max Harris
  • 1966 – March of the Mods – Tony Carr
  • 1967 – The Power Game – Wayne Hill
  • 1968 – Love in the Open Air – Paul McCartney
  • 1969 – Ring of Kerry – Peter Hope
  • 1971 – March from the Colour Suite – Gordon Langford
  • 1975 – Four Dances from Aladdin – Ernest Tomlinson
  • 1976 – Introduction and Air to a Stained Glass Window – John Gregory
  • 1977 – Rain Forest – Biddu
  • 1978 – Cavatina – Stanley Myers
  • 1979 – Song For Guy – Elton John
  • 1980 – War of the Worlds – Jeff Wayne and Gary Osborne

Best Comedy Song

  • 1956 – Got’n Idea – Paddy Roberts and Jack Woodman
  • 1958 – Three Brothers – Paddy Roberts
  • 1959 – I’m So Ashamed – Ken Hare
  • 1960 – The Ballad of Bethnal Green – Paddy Roberts
  • 1964 – Flash, Bang, Wallop – David Heneker
  • 1966 – A Windmill In Old Amsterdam – Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge
  • 1967 – Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy? – Allan Smethurst
  • 1968 – Grocer Jack – Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • 1969 – I’m the Urban Spaceman – Neil Innes
  • 1971 – Grandad – Herbie Flowers and Ken Pickett
  • 1972 – Ernie – Benny Hill
  • 1973 – The People Tree – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1974 – Nice One Cyril – Helen Clarke and Harold Spiro

Best Swing / Rhythm Composition

  • 1956 – Big City Suite – Ralph Dollimore
  • 1957 – Itinerary of an Orchestra – Johnny Dankworth and Dave Lindup
  • 1958 – Overdrive – Tommy Watt

Best Jazz Work

  • 1959 – The Colonel’s Tune – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1960 – Beaulieu Festival Suite – Kenny Graham
  • 1961 – Apache – Jerry Lordan
  • 1962 – African Waltz – Galt Macdermot
  • 1963 – Outbreak of Murder – Gordon Franks
  • 1964 – What the Dickens – Johnny Dankworth

Best Beat Song

  • 1966 – It’s Not Unusual – Gordon Mills and Les Reed
  • 1969 – Build Me Up Buttercup – Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • 1974 – Rubber Bullets – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley and Graham Gouldman

Best Ballad or Romantic Song

  • 1969 – I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten – Clive Westlake
  • 1971 – Home Lovin’ Man – Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway and Tony Macaulay
  • 1972 – No Matter How I Try – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1973 – The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face – Ewan MacColl
  • 1974 – Won’t Somebody Dance with Me – Lynsey De Paul

The Best Pop Song

  • 1971 – Love Grows – Tony Macaulay and Barry Mason
  • 1972 – Simple Game – Mike Pinder
  • 1973 – Oh Babe What Could I Say – Hurricane Smith
  • 1974 – You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me – Tony Macaulay and Geoff Stephens
  • 1975 – Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas
  • 1976 – I’m Not In Love – Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 1977 – Don’t Go Breaking My Heart – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Baker Street – Gerry Rafferty
  • 1980 – I Don’t Like Mondays – Bob Geldof
  • 1981 – Stop the Cavalry – Jona Lewie
  • 1982 – Every Little Thing She Does is Magic – Sting
  • 1983 – Our House – Carl Smyth and Chris Foreman
  • 1984 – Karma Chameleon – Boy George, John Moss, Michael Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett

Best Middle of the Road Song

  • 1976 – Harry – Catherine Howe
  • 1977 – Music – John Miles

The Ivors Dance Award

  • 1998 – You’re Not Alone – Tim Kellett and Robin Taylor-Firth
  • 1999 – Horny – Mousse T and Errol Rennalls
  • 2000 – Re-Rewind – Mark Hill/Craig David
  • 2001 – Woman Trouble – Mark Hill, Craig David, Robbie Craig and Pete Devereux
  • 2002 – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head – Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis
  • 2003 – Lazy – Ashley Beedle, Darren House, Darren Rock and David Byrne
  • 2004 – Strict Machine – Alison Goldfrapp, Will Gregory and Nick Batt

Musicals, Films, Television, Radio, and Video Games

The Best Song From a Musical

  • 1956 – Salad Days – Dorothy Reynolds and Julian Slade
  • 1958 – Free as Air – Dorothy Reynolds, Julian Slade
  • 1960 – Lock Up Your Daughters – Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson
  • 1961 – Oliver! – Lionel Bart
  • 1962 – Stop the World I Want to Get Off – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1966 – Charlie Girl – David Heneker and John Taylor
  • 1972 – I Don’t Know How To Love Him – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best British Musical

  • 1963 – Summer Holiday – Brian Bennett, Stanley Black, Ronald Cass, Mike Conlin, Hank Marvin, Peter Myers, Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • 1965 – Robert and Elizabeth – Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar
  • 1974 – Jesus Christ Superstar – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1975 – Treasure Island – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1976 – Great Expectations – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1978 – Privates on Parade – Denis King and Peter Nicholls
  • 1979 – Evita – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1980 – Songbook – Monty Norman and Julian Mo
  • 1982 – Cats – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn
  • 1983 – Windy City – Tony Macaulay and Dick Vosburgh
  • 1984 – Blood Brothers – Willie Russell
  • 1985 – The Hired Man – Howard Goodall
  • 1986 – Me and My Girl – Reginald Armitage and Douglas Furber
  • 1987 – The Phantom of the Opera – Charles Hart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe
  • 1990 – Aspects of Love – Don Black, Charles Hart and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1992 – Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best Film Score Theme or Song

  • 1957 – The March Hare – Philip Green
  • 1959 – Inn of the Sixth Happiness – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1967 – Born Free – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1973 – Diamonds Are Forever – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Bright Eyes – Mike Batt
  • 1980 – Caravans – Mike Batt
  • 1981 – Xanadu – Jeff Lynne
  • 1982 – The French Lieutenant’s Woman – Carl Davis
  • 1983 – For All Mankind – Ravi Shankar and George Fenton
  • 1984 – Going Home – Mark Knopfler
  • 1985 – We All Stand Together – Paul McCartney
  • 1986 – We Don’t Need Another Hero – Graham Lyle and Terry Britten
  • 1987 – Sweet Freedom – Rod Temperton
  • 1988 – Cry Freedom – George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa
  • 1989 – Two Hearts – Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier
  • 1990 – Henry V Nons Nobis Domine – Patrick Doyle
  • 1991 – Witches – Stanley Myers
  • 1992 – Under Suspicion – Christopher Gunning
  • 1993 – Tears in Heaven – Eric Clapton and Will Jennings
  • 1994 – The Piano – Michael Nyman
  • 1995 – Circle of Life – Elton John and Tim Rice
  • 1996 – Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman – Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange, Michael Kamen and Bryan Adams
  • 1998 – Picture of You – Paul Wilson, Andy Watkins, Ronan Keating and Eliot Kennedy
  • 1999 – The Flame Still Burns – Chris Difford, Marti Frederiksen and Mick Jones

Best Original Film Score

  • 1968 – Doctor Dolittle – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1969 – Madwoman of Caillot – Michael Lewis
  • 1976 – Murder on the Orient Express – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 1979 – The Silent Witness – Alan Hawkshaw
  • 1995 – Shadowlands – George Fenton
  • 1996 – Don Juan De Marco – Michael Kamen
  • 1997 – 101 Dalmatians – Michael Kamen
  • 1998 – William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet – Craig Armstrong, Marius De Vries and Nellee Hooper
  • 1999 – Firelight – Christopher Gunning
  • 2000 – The World Is Not Enough – David Arnold
  • 2001 – X-Men – Michael Kamen
  • 2002 – Shrek – Harry Gregson-Williams and John Powell
  • 2003 – The Quiet American – Craig Armstrong
  • 2004 – Max – Dan Jones
  • 2005 – Enduring Love – Jeremy Sams
  • 2006 – Evil – Francis Shaw
  • 2007 – Ice Age: The Meltdown – John Powell
  • 2008 – Atonement – Dario Marianelli
  • 2009 – There Will Be Blood – Jonny Greenwood
  • 2010 – Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs – John Powell
  • 2011 – How To Train Your Dragon – John Powell
  • 2012 – The First Grader – Alex Heffes
  • 2013 – Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
  • 2014 – The Epic of Everest – Simon Fisher Turner
  • 2015 – ‘71 – David Holmes
  • 2016 – Ex_Machina – Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury
  • 2017 – Kubo and the Two Strings – Dario Marianelli
  • 2018 – Jackie – Mica Levi

Best Television or Radio Theme or Song

  • 1962 – The Maigret Theme – Ron Grainer
  • 1963 – Steptoe and Son – Ron Grainer
  • 1964 – Theme from ‘The Avengers’ – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1965 – Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life – Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin
  • 1971 – Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mr Hitler – Jimmy Perry and Derek Taverner
  • 1974 – Galloping Home – Denis King
  • 1975 – No Honestly! – Lynsey De Paul
  • 1976 – The Edwardians (Upstairs, Downstairs Theme) – Alexander Faris
  • 1977 – Sam – John McCabe
  • 1978 – Poldark – Kenyon Emrys-Roberts
  • 1979 – Lillie – Joseph Horovitz
  • 1980 – Nunc Dimittis – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1981 – I Could Be So Good for You – Gerard Kenny and Patricia Waterman
  • 1982 – Brideshead Revisited – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1983 – Theme From Harry’s Game – Paul Brennan
  • 1984 – That’s Livin’ Alright – David Mackay and Ken Ashby
  • 1985 – Jewel in the Crown – George Fenton
  • 1986 – Edge of Darkness – Eric Clapton and Michael Kamen
  • 1987 – The Monocled Mutineer – George Fenton
  • 1988 – Fortunes of War – Richard Holmes
  • 1989 – Testament – Nigel Hess
  • 1990 – Ruth Rendell Mysteries – Brian Bennett
  • 1991 – Victorian Kitchen – Paul Reade
  • 1992 – Darling Buds of May – Philip Burley and Barrie Guard
  • 1993 – Civvies – Michael Storey
  • 1994 – Stalag Luft – Stanley Myers
  • 1995 – Middlemarch – Stanley Myers
  • 1996 – The Hanging Gale – Shaun Davey
  • 1997 – Hetty Wainthropp Investigates – Nigel Hess
  • 1998 – Rebecca – Christopher Gunning
  • 1999 – Close Relations – Rob Lane
  • 2000 – Trial By Fire – Richard G Mitchell
  • 2001 – Gormenghast – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2002 – The Blue Planet – George Fenton

Best Television or Radio Soundtrack

  • 1973 – Colditz – Robert Farnon
  • 2003 – Feltham Sings – Dextrous and Simon Armitage
  • 2004 – The Young Visitors – Nicholas Hooper
  • 2005 – Blackpool – Rob Lane
  • 2006 – Elizabeth I – Rob Lane
  • 2007 – The Virgin Queen – Martin Phipps
  • 2008 – Oliver Twist – Martin Phipps
  • 2009 – Wallace and Gromit (A Matter of Loaf and Death) – Julian Nott
  • 2010 – Desperate Romantics – Daniel Pemberton
  • 2011 – Any Human Heart – Dan Jones
  • 2012 – The Shadow Line – Martin Phipps
  • 2013 – Lucian Freud: Painted Life – John Harle
  • 2014 – Ripper Street – Dominik Scherrer
  • 2015 – The Honourable Woman – Natalie Holt and Martin Phipps
  • 2016 – London Spy – Keefus Ciancia and David Holmes
  • 2017 – War and Peace – Martin Phipps
  • 2018 – The Miniaturist – Dan Jones

Best Theme from a Commercial

  • 1990 – Abbey Endings (Abbey National) – Lionel Bart
  • 1991 – Only You (Fiat Tempra) – Geoff MacCormack and Simon Goldenberg
  • 1992 – Driven By You (Ford Motor Company) – Brian May

Best Original Video Game Score

  • 2010 – Killzone 2 – Joris de Man
  • 2011 – Napoleon: Total War – Richard Beddow, Richard Birdsall and Ian Livingstone
  • 2018 – Horizon Zero Dawn – Joris de Man, Joe Henson and Alexis Smith
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Ivor Novello Awards – The 1960s

Before we launch into the “Ivors” from the sixties, a quick word about the credits here. The Ivor Novello Awards are, unusually and entirely laudably, given for songwriting rather than performing, but that isn’t necessarily compatible with most people understand music. In the interests of context, I’ve therefore added performer names where I know them (but I didn’t bother researching them in a lot of detail, so please comment below if you see things you feel need changing!)

Apart from the usual pop suspects, it’s great to see awards and nominations for John Barry and Ron Grainer in amongst these lists!

Ivor Novello Awards 1960

The fifth Ivor Novello Awards were broadcast on BBC Television on 6th June 1960, with Eric Robinson conducting the Orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: Side Saddle, written by Russ Conway. Also nominated: Living Doll, by Lionel Bart
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: The Village of St. Bernadette, written by Eula Parker. Also nominated: Maybe This Year, by Ronald Wakley and Marcel Stellman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Item: The Ballad of Bethnal Green, written by Paddy Roberts. Also nominated: Little White Bull, by Michael Pratt, Lionel Bart and Tommy Steele
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Beaulieu Festival Suite, written by Kenny Graham. Also nominated: Jazzboatby Joe Henderson
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Windows of Parish, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Ring Ding, by Steve Race
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Lock Up Your Daughters, written by Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson. Also nominated: Meet The Familyby Peter Greenwell and Peter Wildeblood
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Lionel Bart

Ivor Novello Awards 1961

The 1961 ceremony was presented by W.E. Butlin, and broadcast on BBC Television on 20th May 1961. The broadcast was introduced by David Jacobs, and starred Max Bygraves, Georgia Brown, Matt Monro, Craig Douglas, Bert Weedon, Paddy Roberts, Max Harris and Douglas Gamley. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra which was led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: As Long As He Needs Me, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: Apache, performed by The Shadows, written by Jerry Lordan
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: Portrait Of My Love, written by Norman Newell and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: As Long As He Needs Me, by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Seashore, written by Robert Farnon. Also nominated: The Willow Waltz, by Cyril Watters
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Apache. Also nominated: Hit and Miss, by John Barry
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Oliver, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: The Gurney Slade Theme, by Max Harris
  • Judges’ Choice Award (any work which in the opinion of the Judges, is worthy of an Award, but which may not necessarily be governed by Existing Categories): Goodness Gracious Me, written by Herbert Kretzmer and David Lee. Also nominated: The Belle of Barking Creek, by Paddy Roberts
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Eric Maschwitz
  • Special Award: What Do You Want If You Don’t Want Money?, written by Johnny Worth

Ivor Novello Awards 1962

W.E. Butlin turned up again for the 1962 ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 13th May 1962. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Cliff Richard and The Shadows, Anthony Newley, Helen Shapiro and Her Hair, Matt Monro, Johnny Dankworth and His Orchestra, Tony Osborne, Ron Grainer and The Ivor Raymonde Singers. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: My Kind of Girl, written by Leslie Bricusse. Also nominated: Portrait of My Love, by Cyril Ornadel and Norman Newell
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1961 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Walkin’ Back To Happiness, written by Michael Hawker and John Schroeder. Also nominated: Are You Sure, by Bob Allison and John Allison
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: What Kind of Fool Am I?, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley. Also nominated: No Greater Love, by Michael Carr and Bunny Lewis
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: The Secrets of the Seine, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Stranger on the Shore, by Acker Bilk
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: African Waltz, written by Galt Macdermot. Also nominated: Duddly Dell, by Dudley Moore
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Stage Play: Stop The World I Want to Get Off, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: The Maigret Theme, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: The Avengers’ Theme, by Johnny Dankworth
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Cliff Richard and The Shadows

Ivor Novello Awards 1963

For the third year running, W.E. Butlin presented the eighth Ivor Novello ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 4th May 1963. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Acker Bilk, Matt Monro, The Tornados, Steve Race, Ron Grainer, Gordon Franks and Cliff Richard and The Shadows.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Stranger on the Shore, written by Acker Bilk. Also nominated: Wonderful Land, by Jerry Lordan
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1962 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Telstar, written by Joe Meek. Also nominated: Bachelor Boy, by Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: My Love and Devotion, written by Howard Barnes, Harold Fields and Joe Roncoroni. Also nominated: Jeannie, by Norman Newell and Russ Conway
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral or Other Non-Vocal Composition: Nicola, written by Steve Race. Also nominated: Turkish Coffee, by Tony Osborne
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: Outbreak of Murder, written by Gordon Franks. Also nominated: Revival, by Joe Harriott
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical: Summer Holiday, performed by Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Also nominated: Blitz, written by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: Steptoe and Son, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: March from A Little Suite, by Trevor Duncan
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Popular and Light Music: Lawrence Wright

Ivor Novello Awards 1964

As we now know, 1963 was the year when popular music changed for good, with The Beatles rising to fame. For the 1964 award ceremony, they evolved quickly, ditching most of the jazz instrumentals and switching to a heavy focus on the Fab Four.

  • The Most Broadcast Work of the Year: She Loves You, performed by The Beatles and written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Dance One, by Elaine Murtagh, Valerie Murtagh and Ray Adams
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1963 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: She Loves You, by The Beatles. Also nominated: I Want To Hold Your Hand, same artist
  • The Year’s Outstanding Song: If I Ruled The World, written by Leslie Bricusse and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: All My Loving, by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Carlos’ Theme, written by Ivor Slaney. Also nominated: Scarlett O’Hara, by Jerry Lordan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Jazz Work: What the Dickens, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Sweet September, by Bill McGuffie
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Show, For Stage, Cinema, Television or Radio: Theme from The Avengers, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Half a Sixpence, by David Heneker
  • The Year’s Most Amusing or Novel Composition: Flash, Bang, Wallop, written by David Heneker. Also nominated: Harvest of Love, by Benny Hill and Tony Hatch
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: The Beatles and some additional hangers-on (Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr)
  • Special Award in Recognition of Fifty Years’ Service to the Music Industry: Performing Rights Society

Ivor Novello Awards 1965

The tenth ceremony, somewhat hilariously sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin (yes, him), took place on 13th July 1965 at the Savoy Hotel.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Can’t Buy Me Love, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1964 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Can’t Buy Me Love. Also nominated: I Feel Fine, same artist
  • Outstanding Song of 1964: Downtown, written by Tony Hatch. Also nominated: Losing You, by Tom Springfield and Clive Westlake
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Bombay Duckling, written by Max Harris
  • The Year’s Outstanding Theme from Radio, TV or Film: Not So Much A Programme, More A Way Of Life, written by Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Robert and Elizabeth, written by Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar. Also nominated: Maggie May, written by Lionel Bart
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Paddy Roberts

Ivor Novello Awards 1966

The 1966 ceremony, also sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, took place at the Hammersmith Palais, London, and was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra. It was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 12th July 1966.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: I’ll Never Find Another You, written by Tom Springfield. Also nominated: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1965 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: We Can Work It Out, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Help
  • Outstanding Song of 1965: Yesterday, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Where Are You Now My Love, written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • The Year’s Outstanding Beat Song: It’s Not Unusual, performed by Tom Jones, written by Gordon Mills and Les Reed. Also nominated: Look Through Any Window, by Graham Gouldman and Charles Silverman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Composition: A Windmill In Old Amsterdam, written by Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge. Also nominated: Mrs Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter, written by Trevor Peacock
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Charlie Girl, written by David Heneker and John Taylor
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contemporary Folk Song: Catch the Wind, by Donovan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Instrumental Composition: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr. Also nominated: The Kiss, by Jack Parnell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: BBC TV, for the production of the series A Song For Europe

Ivor Novello Awards 1967

Still sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, the twelfth ceremony took place at the Lyceum Ballroom, London, was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra, and was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 27th March 1967.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Michelle, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Yesterday
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1966 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Yellow Submarine, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: What Would I Be, written by Jackie Trent
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Winchester Cathedral, written by Geoff Stephens. Also nominated: Call Me, written by Tony Hatch
  • Film Song of the Year: Born Free, written by John Barry and Don Black. Also nominated: Time Drags By, performed by The Shadows, written by Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch, Brian Bennett and John Rostill
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy?, written by Allan Smethurst. Also nominated: Dedicated Follower of Fashion, written by Ray Davies
  • Instrumental Composition of the Year: The Power Game, written by Wayne Hill. Also nominated: Khartoum, written by Frank Cordell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Joe Loss

Ivor Novello Awards 1968

For some reason, from 1968 onwards, history no longer seems to record the nominated but losing entries.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Puppet on a String, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1967 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: The Last Waltz, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: A Whiter Shade of Pale, performed by Procul Harum, written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid
  • Best British Song, Musically and Lyrically: She’s Leaving Home, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Grocer Jack, written by Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • Best Instrumental Theme: Love in the Open Air, written by Paul McCartney
  • Special Award: Leslie Bricusse, for The Film Score Doctor Dolittle
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Alan Herbert

Ivor Novello Awards 1969

The fourteenth Ivor Novello Awards were sponsored by the BBC, and took place on 22nd May 1969.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Congratulations, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1968 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Hey Jude, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Delilah, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • The Most Romantic Song of the Year: I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten, written by Clive Westlake
  • Outstanding Dance / Beat Song of the Year: Build Me Up Buttercup, written by Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • Novelty Song of the Year: I’m The Urban Spaceman, written by Neil Innes
  • Light Music Composition of the Year: Ring of Kerry, written by Peter Hope
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Andrew Gold (presented posthumously)

Further Reading

The British Record Industry Awards 1984

On February 21st 1984, Tim Rice was standing on stage at the Grosvenor House Hotel, about to introduce the fourth BRIT Awards. This post is part of a series about the history of the BRIT Awards. You can read about the 1983 ceremony here, and the 1985 ceremony here.

Best British Female

Nominees:

  • Annie Lennox
  • Alison Moyet
  • Bonnie Tyler
  • Tracey Ullman
  • Toyah Wilcox

Winner: Annie Lennox

Best British Group

Nominees:

  • Culture Club
  • Eurythmics
  • Madness
  • The Police
  • UB40

Winner: Culture Club

Best British Male

Nominees:

  • David Bowie
  • Elton John
  • Paul McCartney
  • Cliff Richard
  • Paul Young

Winner: David Bowie

Best British Newcomer

Nominees:

  • Big Country
  • Howard Jones
  • Tracey Ullman
  • Wham!
  • Paul Young

Winner: Paul Young

Best British Producer

Nominees:

  • Peter Collins
  • Trevor Horn
  • Langer and Winstanley
  • Steve Levine
  • Steve Lilywhite

Winner: Steve Levine

Best British Single

Winner: Culture ClubKarma Chameleon

Best Classical Recording

Nominees:

  • Kiri Te Kanawa – Songs of the Auvergne
  • Puccini – La Rondine
  • Simon Rattle – War Requiem – Britten
  • Tippett – Triple Concerto
  • Trevor Pinnock – Water Music – Handel

Winner: Kiri Te Kanawa

Best Comedy Record

Winner: Neil

Best International Artist

Nominees:

  • Darryl Hall and John Oates
  • Michael Jackson
  • Billy Joel
  • Men at Work
  • Lionel Richie

Winner: Michael Jackson

Best Selling Album

Winner: Michael JacksonThriller

Best Soundtrack / Cast Recording

Winner: Prince – Purple Rain

Outstanding Contribution

Winner: George Martin

Sony Trophy for Technical Excellence

Winner: Spandau Ballet

Performances

Further Reading / Viewing

Edit: fix links (6 January 2018).

The British Record Industry Awards 1983

The third ceremony took place at Grosvenor House Hotel in London on 8th February 1983, where it was presented by Tim Rice.

This post is part of a series about the history of the BRIT Awards. You can read about the 1982 ceremony here, and the 1984 ceremony in a couple of days’ time.

Since there’s not a lot of video of the 1983 ceremony, here’s some BBC coverage:

Best British Album

Nominees:

  • The Kids from Fame – The Kids from Fame
  • Madness – Complete Madness
  • Barbara Streisand – Love Songs

Winner: Barbara Streisand.

Best British Female

Nominees:

  • Sheena Easton
  • Toyah Wilcox
  • Kim Wilde
  • Mari Wilson

Winner: Kim Wilde.

Best British Group

Nominees:

  • ABC
  • Dire Straits
  • Yazoo

Winner: Dire Straits.

Best British Male

Nominees:

  • Phil Collins
  • Paul McCartney
  • Cliff Richard
  • Shakin’ Stevens

Winner: Paul McCartney.

Best British Newcomer

Nominees:

  • ABC
  • Culture Club
  • Musical Youth
  • Yazoo

Winner: Yazoo.

Best British Producer

Nominees:

  • Trevor Horn
  • Clive Langer & Alan Winstanley
  • George Martin
  • Martin Rushent

Winner: Trevor Horn.

Best British Single

Nominees:

  • Irene Cara – Fame
  • Dexys Midnight Runners – Come on Eileen
  • Survivor – Eye of the Tiger

Winner: Dexys Midnight Runners.

Best Classical Recording

Nominees:

  • Christopher Hogwood – Violin Concertos – Bach
  • Julian Lloyd Webber – Portrait – John WIlliams
  • Mariner – Symphonies 6, 7 & 8
  • Simon Rattle – Glagolitic Mass – Jacanek
  • Rodrigo – Concerto Como Un

Winner: Julian Lloyd Webber.

Best International Artist

Nominees:

  • Julio Iglesias
  • Kid Creole and The Coconuts
  • Barry Manilow

Winner: Kid Creole and The Coconuts.

Life Achievement

Winner: Pete Townshend.

Sony Trophy for Technical Excellence

Winner: Paul McCartney.

Special Award

Winner: Chris Wright.

Outstanding Contribution

Winner: The Beatles.

Performances

Unknown

Further Reading / Viewing

Edit: removed one video that is no longer available (13 August 2017).

Edit: fix links (6 January 2018).

Five More Fascinating BRIT Awards Facts

Well you’ll have seen the ceremony by now of course, so here are some more of my “fascinating” facts…

Recognising the “Rest of the World”

Apart from one award in 1983, the BRITs didn’t fully separate Britain from the rest of the world until 1986, when Huey Lewis & the News received the first Best International Artist award. In 1989, Michael Jackson and Tracy Chapman were named the first Best International Solo Artists, but then in 1990, 1992, and 1993, there was only space for one combined Best International Solo Artist award, won by Neneh CherryPrince, and Prince respectively.

The International Breakthrough Artist (or Best International Newcomer) first turned up in 1988, and was won by Terence Trent D’Arby. The Best International Album award didn’t arrive until 2002, and the first winner was Kylie Minogue for Fever, although Michael Jackson had already won the Best Album award for Thriller in 1984.

BRIT Awards Luvvies

Some people just seem to walk the awards, and get nominated almost annually for the same award. Some of them even seem to win it annually. Here’s a quick selection:

  • Robbie Williams – won British Male Solo Artist in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2003, as well as a whole heap of other stuff and nominations in the same category in 1998, 2006, and 2010. Phil Collins had been his predecessor for that award, winning in 1986, 1989, and 1990 with further nominations in 1992 and 1993.
  • Annie Lennox – astoundingly, won British Female Solo Artist in 1984, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, and 1996, plus a nomination in 2004, making her the most successful artist to win any single award. Lisa Stansfield (one win in 1991 but nominations in 1992, 1993, 1995, and 1998) and Alison Moyet (wins in 1985 and 1988) also tried to topple her crown but failed. PJ Harvey tried her hardest with nominations in 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005, and 2008, but failed to win any of them.
  • Jamiroquai – managed a Best Dance Act nomination 6 out of the 11 times it was awarded despite not even really being a dance act.
  • Robbie Williams again – won Best British Single with Take That in 1993, 1994, and 1996, and then solo in 1999, 2000, and 2001. And then again with Take That in 2007 and 2008, giving him a shelf full of eight awards in this category. He also got a good set of Best Video awards to go on the shelf below.
  • You might think there would be enough International Male Solo Artists for a bit of variety, but apparently not. Prince won in 1992, 1993, 1995, and 1996 (the last time as The Artist Formerly Known As Prince, and then he was nominated as The Artist in 1997 before he ran out of silly names). Then Beck took over, winning in 1997, 1999, and 2000 and being nominated in 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, and 2009. Eminem won in 2001, 2003, and 2005, with two further nominations. Most recently, Kanye West won in 2006, 2008, and 2009. In the International Female Solo Artist category, things are nearly as repetitive, with multiple wins for BjörkKylie MinogueMadonna, and RihannaAlicia Keys has taken six nominations but no wins as yet.
  • U2 – won International Group in 1988, 1989, 1990, 1998, and 2001, with further nominations basically every year: 1992, 1993, 1994, 2005, and 2006. While they were taking a break, R.E.M. stepped in in 1992, 1993, and 1995 plus nominations in 1997, 1999, and 2000, before being replaced by Foo Fighters for 2008 and 2012 after unsuccessful nominations in 1996 and 2003.
  • Finally, the Outstanding Contribution is normally pretty free of repetition, right? Nope. The Beatles shared the award in 1977. Then John Lennon grabbed it posthumously in 1982. Then they came back again for it as a group in 1983. George Martin got it in 1984. Finally, Paul McCartney broke two decades of silence by grabbing it in 2008. The other people who think it’s OK to take it home more than once are Elton John and Queen.

Best Soundtrack or Original Cast Recording

It’s a bit of a shame that this award hasn’t been given since 2001. For sixteen years, it was handed out to the likes of Top GunPhantom of the OperaBatman (in 1990 and 1996), Twin PeaksTrainspotting, and American Beauty.

But soundtracks are a key part of music, so I think it is a shame that they don’t do this one any more…

Back from the Dead

From 1990 to 1998, there was a Best Producer award. Then from 1999 to 2010, there wasn’t. But now it’s back, and rightfully so. Previous winners include Dave Stewart out of EurythmicsTrevor HornPeter GabrielBrian Eno (twice), Nellee Hooper, and Youth.

The people behind the music generally remain forgotten by the BRITs. The first ever Outstanding Contribution award in 1977 was shared between The Beatles and EMI boss LG Wood. In 2011 Tony Visconti was given a rare special award for Innovation in Production. But the biggest surprise for me was the same year, and was largely forgotten about by the mainstream media, maybe because they didn’t know who he was. But the Outstanding Contribution award in 2011 was quite rightly given to Daniel Miller.

Also back from the dead is the Best Live Act award, won by U2 in 1993, Spice Girls (as Best Selling British Live Act) in 2000, and then MuseKaiser ChiefsMuse again, Take That, and Iron Maiden from 2005 to 2009, before inexplicably being axed again just as live music exploded in popularity.

Special Awards and Long Forgotten Awards

Occasionally, the BRITs decide to give an award to somebody just because they want to. Some of them are for charity deeds, or just generally for selling pretty well. Here’s a summary:

  • 1994 – Special Sales Award – Meat Loaf
  • 1996 – Freddie Mercury Award – Help! Project
  • 1996 – Artist of a Generation – Michael Jackson
  • 1998 – Freddie Mercury Award – Elton John
  • 1999 – Freddie Mercury Award – Jubilee 2000
  • 2005 – BRITs 25 – The Best Song Award – Robbie Williams – Angels
  • 2010 – BRITs Hits 30 – Spice Girls – Wannabe / Who Do You Think You Are
  • 2010 – BRITs Album of 30 Years – Oasis(What’s the Story) Morning Glory
  • 2011 – Innovation in Production – Tony Visconti

But to me a really fascinating moment was when I discovered by accident that there had once been a Best Comedy Recording award at the BRITs. I’m still not clear how long it went on for, or who most of the winners were, as it was largely undocumented, but I’d love to see that one come back.

Awards Week will continue tomorrow with something else that I make up on the spot.

Incidentally, apologies about some of the missing videos on recent posts – the BRITs official website got remodelled after I’d written the pieces, and some of the YouTube ones got removed. Never mind…

Edit: this post originally said the first international award was in 1986 – in fact there was one in 1983.

British Record Industry Britannia Centenary Awards 1977

As a general rule, the further back you go in the history of what we now call the BRIT Awards, the harder it becomes to find information about them. And the 1977 ceremony was the very first of the lot, so sure enough finding information about the awards is nigh on impossible. This post is going to be relatively short.

But it needs to be done, so let’s cast ourselves back a long way into the past, right back to October 18th 1977. Michael Aspel is our host, and the venue is Wembley Conference Centre, London.

The event was a celebration of music, but it was also timed to celebrate two anniversaries – it was 100 years since Thomas Edison invented the sound recording, and also the Queen’s Silver Jubilee year. By coincidence, it was also almost exactly 25 years since the publication of the first UK chart, but it’s not clear to me whether anybody realised this at the time. Nominations were for the best music of the preceding 25 years, which is why they are a little eclectic in places, although for all of that, there’s a very definite 1970s bias.

Best British Album

Nominees:

  • Elton John – Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (1973)
  • Mike Oldfield – Tubular Bells (1973)
  • The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)
  • Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon (1973)

Winner: The Beatles.

Best British Female

Nominees:

  • Cleo Lane
  • Dusty Springfield
  • Shirley Bassey
  • Petula Clark

Jazz singer Dame Cleo Lane is probably the least famous of the bunch. Despite managing a couple of hit singles in the 1960s, she must have been a lot more popular with “the industry” than the public! Or maybe not…

Winner: Shirley Bassey.

Best British Female Newcomer

Nominees:

  • Bonnie Tyler
  • Julie Covington

Julie, of course, had the honour of recording the original version of Don’t Cry for Me Argentina, which had hit number one in February 1977. An album would follow in 1978, and then she returned to the theatre.

Winner: Julie Covington.

Best British Group

Rather predictable nominees:

  • The Beatles
  • Pink Floyd
  • Rolling Stones
  • The Who

Winner: The Beatles. Who would have thought it?

Best British Male

Another predictable bunch:

  • Cliff Richard
  • Elton John
  • Rod Stewart
  • Tom Jones

Winner: Cliff Richard.

Best British Male Newcomer

Nominees:

  • Graham Parker
  • Heatwave

Here’s an interesting pair. Graham Parker wouldn’t release any solo material until 1979, and so we have to assume that the nomination was for his work with The Rumour, which had included hit singles with Hold Back the Night and Sweet on You earlier in 1977. He would carry on recording for a long time after, but never managed to regain his initial success.

Heatwave, on the other hand, had already had a number two hit with Boogie Nights, and would continue hitting the top twenty for the next three years. So who won?

Winner: Graham Parker. Hindsight, it seems, is a fine thing!

Best Comedy Recording

I’m assuming that’s what this award was for – The BRITs website lists it under the wrong category. Nominees:

  • Monty Python
  • Richard Burton & Cast
  • Tony Hancock

Winner: unfortunately history doesn’t record who won!

Best British Producer

Nominees:

  • George Martin
  • Glyn Johns
  • Gus Dudgeon
  • Mickie Most

As is normal with the Best Producer category, I’ve never heard of most of these, but I’m not proposing looking them up…

Winner: George Martin.

Best British Single

Nominees:

  • 10cc – I’m Not in Love (1975)
  • Procul Harum – Whiter Shade of Pale (1967)
  • Queen – Bohemian Rhapsody (1975)
  • The Beatles – She Loves You (1963)

Winner: a tie, shared by Procul Harum

… and Queen.

Best Classical Recording

Nominees:

  • Janet Baker – Das Lied von der Erde
  • John Williams – Guitar Concerto – Rodrigo

Winner: again, history doesn’t record who won this!

Best International Pop Album

Nominees:

  • Abba – Arrival (1976)
  • Carole King – Tapestry (1971)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water (1970)
  • Stevie Wonder – Songs in the Key of Life (1976)

Winner: Simon & Garfunkel.

Best International Pop Single

Nominees:

  • Elvis Presley – Jailhouse Rock (1957)
  • Frank Sinatra – My Way (1969)
  • Ike & Tina Turner – River Deep, Mountain High (1966)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water (1970)

Elvis, of course, had only passed away a couple of months prior to this ceremony.

Winner: unknown.

Best Orchestral Album

Nominees:

  • Oliver Knussen – War Requiem
  • Otto Klemperer – Beethoven Symphonies
  • Sir Adrian Boult – The Planet Suite
  • Sir Georg Solti – Wagner Ring Cycle

Otto Klemperer is my favourite, mainly because he wouldn’t have looked out of place in a silent movie. Actually, since he was born in 1885, he probably was in one.

Winner: unknown.

Outstanding Contribution

Joint winners: The Beatles and L.G. Wood.

The story of L.G. Wood is sadly forgotten in the internet age (OK, he isn’t on Wikipedia), but the BRITs website describes him as “a remarkable figure”. He was chairman of the BPI and EMI in 1977, and was apparently the person who originally signed The Beatles.

Performances

  • Cliff Richard – Miss You Nights
  • George Martin – A Hard Day’s Night
  • Julie Covington – Only Women Bleed
  • Procul Harum – Whiter Shade of Pale
  • Simon & Garfunkel – Old Friends

Further Reading / Viewing

The BPI Awards 1985

As promised, today we start our journey through the BRIT Awards ceremonies of the past. We begin way back on 11th February 1985 at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London, where Noel Edmonds is introducing the BPI Awards 1985:

The year we’re celebrating, 1984, is, as we now know, one of the most important years in electronic pop music. This ceremony is also among the best documented of any of them. But having seen what we’ve seen in recent years, this is a fascinatingly corporate affair. As we’ll see Edmonds, the James Cordon of his day, does a great job, but the show is almost entirely lacking in glitz, glamour, or indeed Mr. Blobby. As he says, there were fourteen awards altogether, so based on various online sources here’s my relatively complete record of the 1985 ceremony.

Best British Female Solo Artist

Presented by Sting. Nominees:

  • Annie Lennox
  • Alison Moyet
  • Sade
  • Tracey Ullman
  • Kim Wilde

Winner: Alison Moyet.

Best British Album

Presented by Pete Townsend, somewhat the worse for wear. I’m not sure what Noel means when he says “he was the recipient of a special award” – in a previous year perhaps? Anyway, nominees:

  • Sade – Diamond Life
  • Nik Kershaw – Human Racing
  • U2 – The Unforgettable Fire
  • Queen – The Works
  • Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Welcome to the Pleasuredome

In subsequent years, U2 would be forced into the International categories, so it’s strange that they were nominated here, but there we go.

Winner: Sade.

Best Classical Recording

Presented by Richard Baker out of The 1930s. Nominees:

  • Arnold Bax Symphony No. 4 – Ulster Orchestra conducted by Bryden Thomson
  • Britten’s The Turn of the Screw – Royal Opera House Orchestra conducted by Sir Colin Davis
  • Mozart’s The Magic Flute – Rundfunkchor Leipzig and Staatskapelle Dresden conducted by Sir Colin Davis
  • Verdi’s Il Travatore – Orchestra of the National Academy of Santa Cecilia conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini
  • Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons – The Academy of Ancient Music conducted by Christopher Hogwood

Winner: Vivaldi‘s Four Seasons.

Best British Group

Presented by Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi from Status Quo, who at the time had recently given up touring apparently. Before starting again a couple of years later. Nominees:

  • Bronski Beat
  • Frankie Goes to Hollywood
  • Queen
  • U2
  • Wham!

Winner: Wham!

Best British Producer

Presented by George Martin. Nominees:

  • Peter Collins
  • Steve Jolley and Tony Swain
  • Laurie Latham
  • Steve Lillywhite
  • Trevor Horn

Apparently it’s about time he won it for the third time running. Winner: Trevor Horn, who seems to have attended with an animal on his head.

Best British Single

Frankie Goes to Hollywood stood a pretty good chance of winning this one. Nominees:

  • Bronski Beat – Smalltown Boy
  • Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Relax
  • Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Two Tribes
  • George Michael – Careless Whisper
  • Sade – Smooth Operator

Winner: Frankie Goes to Hollywood – Relax.

Best British Male Solo Artist

Presented by Toyah Willcox. Nominees:

  • David Bowie
  • Howard Jones
  • Nik Kershaw
  • Paul McCartney
  • Paul Young

Unfortunately I can’t work out how to embed this video, but you can watch it in full here.

The winner is, of course, Paul Young.

Best Soundtrack / Cast Recording

Presented by Barbara Dickson and Elaine Paige. Nominees:

  • Electric Dreams (various artists)
  • Footloose (various artists)
  • Give My Regards to Broad Street (Paul McCartney)
  • Purple Rain (Prince and the Revolution)
  • The Woman in Red (Stevie Wonder and Dionne Warwick)

Winner: Purple Rain.

Best International Artist

Presented by a rather confused Holly Johnson out of Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Nominees:

  • Michael Jackson
  • Prince and the Revolution
  • Lionel Richie
  • Bruce Springsteen
  • ZZ Top

Winner: a decidedly bemused Prince, but without The Revolution in tow.

Radio 1 Best British Newcomer

Presented by Steve Wright in the afternoon.

Make sure you pay attention to Steve’s advice to stop taping records off the radio. As he says, it’s very, very naughty. Also in a fascinatingly off-colour joke, we learn that apparently Michael Jackson isn’t gay.

Winner: Frankie Goes to Hollywood.

Remember, Relax was banned on BBC Radio 1, so I’m particularly intrigued that their listeners would have voted for them in such numbers!

Runners up: Nik Kershaw (second place), Bronski Beat (third place).

Best Comedy Recording

Presented by “windswept and interesting” Billy Connolly. Nominees:

  • Wierd Al Yankovic – Eat It
  • Neil (The Young Ones) – Hole in My Shoe
  • Roland Rat – Rat Rapping
  • Mel Brooks – To Be or Not to Be (The Hitler Rap)
  • Alexei Sayle – Ullo John Got a New Motor

Winner: Neil from The Young Ones.

Best British Video

Although the strategy of getting nominated multiple times wasn’t quite as successful for Wham! in the video category. Nominees:

  • Duran Duran – Wild Boys
  • Wham! – Wake Me Up Before You Go Go
  • Wham! – Last Christmas

Winner: Duran Duran.

Outstanding Contribution

Winner: The Police.

Special Award

A special award was given to Bob Geldof and Midge Ure for their work on the Band Aid single.

Performances

Just the introductions, I’m afraid…

  • Alison Moyet – All Cried Out
  • Bronski Beat – Smalltown Boy
  • Howard Jones – What is Love?
  • Nik Kershaw – Wouldn’t it Be Good
  • Tina Turner – What’s Love Got to Do with It

Further Reading / Viewing

Edit: by strange coincidence The Guardian decided to celebrate the same ceremony by publishing Neil Tennant‘s review from Smash Hits, which you can read here. Thanks to daveid on the Pet Shop Boys forum for spotting this one.

Edit: removed two videos that are no longer available (13 August 2017).