Ivor Novello Awards Winners 1956-2018 (Part Two)

Last week, we ran through the 63-year history of the Ivor Novello Awards, and listed all the winners in the Song and Album categories, and the special and one-off awards. Let’s finish that journey now, starting with the Artist Award categories.

Artist Awards

Outstanding Services to British Music

  • 1956 – Jack Payne
  • 1957 – A.P. Mantovani
  • 1958 – Ted Heath
  • 1959 – Billy Cotton
  • 1960 – Lionel Bart
  • 1961 – Eric Maschwitz
  • 1962 – Cliff Richard, Jet Harris, Hank Marvin, Tony Meehan and Bruce Welch
  • 1963 – Lawrence Wright
  • 1964 – Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr
  • 1965 – Paddy Roberts
  • 1966 – BBC TV (for the production of the series ‘A Song For Europe’)
  • 1967 – Joe Loss
  • 1968 – Alan Herbert
  • 1969 – Andrew Gold
  • 1970 – Noel Coward
  • 1971 – Cliff Richard
  • 1972 – Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1973 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1974 – Tolchard Evans
  • 1975 – Vera Lynn
  • 1976 – Dick James
  • 1977 – Adrian Boult
  • 1978 – Harry Mortimer
  • 1979 – George Martin
  • 1980 – Robert Mayer
  • 1981 – William Walton
  • 1982 – Lennox Berkeley
  • 1984 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1985 – Michael Tippett
  • 1986 – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1987 – Yehudi Menuhin
  • 1988 – David Heneker
  • 1989 – Paul McCartney
  • 1990 – Mick Avory, Dave Davies, Ray Davies, Ian Gibbons and Jim Rodford
  • 1991 – Robert Farnon
  • 1996 – Jeff Lynne

Songwriter of the Year

  • 1970 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1971 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1972 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1973 – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1974 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1975 – Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • 1976 – Wayne Bickerton and Tony Waddington
  • 1977 – Biddu
  • 1978 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1979 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1980 – Ben Findon
  • 1981 – Ben Findon
  • 1982 – Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni
  • 1983 – Andy Hill
  • 1984 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1985 – George Michael
  • 1986 – Roland Orzabal
  • 1987 – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1988 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1989 – George Michael and Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman (presented jointly)
  • 1990 – Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • 1991 – Phil Collins
  • 1992 – Mick Hucknall
  • 1993 – Colin Angus and Richard West
  • 1994 – Gary Barlow
  • 1995 – Tony Mortimer
  • 1996 – Damon Albarn, Graham Coxon, Alex James, Dave Rowntree and Noel Gallagher (presented jointly)
  • 1997 – George Michael
  • 1998 – Richard Ashcroft
  • 1999 – Guy Chambers and Robbie Williams
  • 2000 – Fran Healy
  • 2001 – Craig David and Mark Hill
  • 2002 – Dido Armstrong
  • 2003 – Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion and Chris Martin
  • 2004 – Ed Graham, Dan Hawkins, Justin Hawkins and Frankie Poullain
  • 2005 – Tom Chaplin, Richard Hughes and Tim Rice-Oxley
  • 2006 – Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett
  • 2007 – Dan Gillespie Sells, Ciaran Jeremiah, Kevin Jeremiah, Richard Jones and Paul Stewart
  • 2008 – Mika
  • 2009 – Eg White
  • 2010 – Lily Allen and Greg Kurstin
  • 2011 – Ben Drew
  • 2012 – Adele Adkins
  • 2013 – Calvin Harris
  • 2014 – Tom Odell
  • 2015 – Ed Sheeran
  • 2016 – Adele
  • 2017 – Skepta
  • 2018 – Ed Sheeran

PRS for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music

  • 1977 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1979 – Jeff Lynne
  • 1981 – John Lennon
  • 1982 – Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Kenney Jones, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend
  • 1983 – Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford
  • 1984 – Andy Brown, Peter Kircher, Alan Lancaster, Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi
  • 1985 – Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, John Lodge, Patrick Moraz and Ray Thomas
  • 1986 – Elton John
  • 1987 – John Deacon, Freddie Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor
  • 1988 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1989 – Mark Knopfler and John Illsley
  • 1990 – David Bowie
  • 1991 – Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and Bill Wyman
  • 1992 – David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters and Richard Wright
  • 1993 – Bernie Calvert, Allan Clarke, Bobby Elliott, Tony Hicks, Graham Nash and Terry Sylvester
  • 1994 – Tim Rice
  • 1995 – Lonnie Donegan
  • 1996 – Kenney Jones, Ronnie Lane, Steve Marriott and Ian McLagan
  • 1997 – Elvis Costello
  • 1998 – Morrissey
  • 1999 – Chrissie Hynde
  • 2000 – Chris Lowe and Neil Tennant
  • 2001 – Topper Headon, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon and Joe Strummer
  • 2002 – Kate Bush
  • 2003 – Bryan Ferry
  • 2004 – Errol Brown
  • 2005 – Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes, Andy Taylor, John Taylor and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Ray Davies
  • 2007 – Norman Cook
  • 2008 – Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook
  • 2009 – Robert Del Naja, Grant Marshall and Andrew Vowles
  • 2010 – Trevor Horn
  • 2011 – Paul Rodgers
  • 2012 – Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Mark Owen and Robbie Williams
  • 2013 – Justin Hayward
  • 2014 – Jeff Beck
  • 2015 – Boy George
  • 2016 – Geoff Barrow, Beth Gibbons and Adrian Utley
  • 2017 – Anne Dudley
  • 2018 – Billy Bragg

International Achievement

  • 1970 – Tom Jones
  • 1980 – Paul McCartney
  • 1991 – Albert Hammond
  • 1992 – Bernie Taupin
  • 1993 – Rod Temperton
  • 1994 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 1997 – Noel Hogan and Dolores O’Riordan
  • 1998 – Enya, Nicky Ryan and Roma Ryan
  • 1999 – Martin Gore
  • 2001 – Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris, Nicko McBrain, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith
  • 2002 – Sting
  • 2003 – Astro, James Brown, Ali Campbell, Robin Campbell, Earl Falconer, Norman Hassan, Brian Travers and Michael Virtue
  • 2004 – Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O’Brien, Phil Selway and Thom Yorke
  • 2005 – Robert Smith
  • 2006 – Ian Anderson
  • 2008 – Phil Collins
  • 2010 – Imogen Heap
  • 2011 – Matthew Bellamy, Dominic Howard and Christopher Wolstenholme
  • 2013 – Gavin Rossdale
  • 2014 – Ted Dwane, Ben Lovett, Winston Marshall and Marcus Mumford
  • 2016 – Wayne Hector
  • 2017 – Florence Welch
  • 2018 – Billy Ocean

Outstanding Contribution to British Musical Theatre

  • 1994 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1996 – Cameron Mackintosh

Lifetime Achievement

  • 1980 – Edgar Yipsel Harburg and Jimmy Kennedy
  • 1983 – Vivian Ellis
  • 1989 – Cliff Richard
  • 1992 – Eric Clapton
  • 1993 – George Shearing
  • 1994 – Ron Goodwin
  • 1995 – Van Morrison
  • 1997 – John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • 1999 – Rod Stewart
  • 2001 – Pete Townshend
  • 2007 – Peter Gabriel
  • 2008 – David Gilmour
  • 2010 – Paul Weller
  • 2012 – Mark Knopfler
  • 2014 – Christine McVie
  • 2015 – Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne and Bill Ward
  • 2016 – Damon Albarn
  • 2017 – Nitin Sawhney

The Jimmy Kennedy Award

  • 1985 – Tommie Connor
  • 1986 – Lionel Bart
  • 1987 – Hugh Charles
  • 1988 – Norman Newell
  • 1989 – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1990 – Herbert Kretzmer
  • 1991 – John Barry
  • 1992 – Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • 1993 – Les Reed
  • 1994 – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1995 – Don Black
  • 1996 – Tony Macaulay
  • 1997 – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1998 – Barry Mason
  • 1999 – Peter Callander and Mitch Murray
  • 2000 – Geoff Stephens

Outstanding Song Collection

  • 1993 – Marcella Detroit, Siobhan Fahey and Dave Stewart
  • 1994 – Paul Weller
  • 1995 – Elvis Costello
  • 1996 – Joan Armatrading
  • 1997 – Richard Thompson
  • 1998 – Johnny McElhone and Sharleen Spiteri
  • 1999 – Wallis Buchanan, Simon Katz, Jason Kay, Derrick McKenzie, Toby Smith and Stuart Zender
  • 2000 – Mike Barson, Mark Bedford, Chris Foreman, Cathal Smyth, Suggs, Lee Thompson and Daniel Woodgate
  • 2001 – Roy Wood
  • 2002 – Mick Hucknall
  • 2003 – Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jnr and The Edge
  • 2004 – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley, Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 2005 – John Deacon, Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor
  • 2006 – Philip Cunningham, Gillian Gilbert, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Bernard Sumner
  • 2007 – Yusuf Islam
  • 2008 – Gabrielle
  • 2009 – Vince Clarke
  • 2011 – Steve Winwood
  • 2012 – Gary Kemp
  • 2013 – Noel Gallagher
  • 2014 – Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons
  • 2015 – Albert Hammond
  • 2016 – Charlie Burchill, Derek Forbes, Jim Kerr and Mick MacNeil
  • 2017 – Pulp
  • 2018 – Cathy Dennis

PRS for Music Special International Award

  • 1999 – Hal David
  • 2000 – Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
  • 2001 – Stevie Wonder
  • 2002 – Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus
  • 2003 – Brian Wilson
  • 2004 – Lamont Dozier, Brian Holland and Eddie Holland
  • 2005 – Lou Reed
  • 2006 – Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff
  • 2007 – Quincy Jones
  • 2008 – Diane Warren
  • 2009 – Smokey Robinson
  • 2010 – Neil Sedaka
  • 2011 – Stephen Sondheim
  • 2012 – Jimmy Webb
  • 2013 – Randy Newman
  • 2014 – Nile Rodgers
  • 2015 – Paul Williams
  • 2016 – Bryan Adams
  • 2017 – Bill Withers
  • 2018 – Lionel Richie

BASCA Fellowship

  • 2006 – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 2009 – David Ferguson
  • 2009 – Don Black
  • 2010 – Tim Rice
  • 2012 – Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 2015 – Annie Lennox

The Ivors Inspiration Award

  • 2008 – Jazzie B
  • 2009 – Edwyn Collins
  • 2010 – Johnny Marr
  • 2011 – Dizzee Rascal
  • 2012 – Siouxsie Sioux
  • 2013 – Marc Almond
  • 2014 – Jerry Dammers
  • 2015 – James Dean Bradfield, Sean Moore and Nicky Wire
  • 2016 – Mark Day, Paul Davis, Paul Ryder, Shaun Ryder and Gary Whelan
  • 2017 – Gary Numan
  • 2018 – Shane MacGowan

The Ivors Classical Music Award

  • 2003 – Boots of Lead – Simon Holt
  • 2004 – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2005 – John Tavener
  • 2006 – Harrison Birtwistle
  • 2007 – John Rutter
  • 2008 – Jonathan Dove
  • 2009 – James MacMillan
  • 2010 – Peter Maxwell Davies
  • 2011 – Michael Nyman
  • 2013 – Errollyn Wallen
  • 2014 – John McCabe
  • 2015 – Judith Weir
  • 2016 – Oliver Knussen
  • 2018 – Thea Musgrave

The Ivors Jazz Award

  • 2012 – Stan Tracey
  • 2017 – John Surman

Genre or Style-Specific Awards

Best Instrumental or Light Orchestral Work

  • 1956 – The Dam Busters – Eric Coates
  • 1957 – The Westminster Waltz – Robert Farnon
  • 1958 – Elizabethan Serenade – Ronald Binge
  • 1959 – Lingering Lovers – Ron Goodwin
  • 1960 – Windows of Parish – Tony Osborne
  • 1961 – Seashore – Robert Farnon
  • 1962 – The Secrets of the Seine – Tony Osborne
  • 1963 – Nicola – Steve Race
  • 1964 – Carlos’ Theme – Ivor Slaney
  • 1965 – Bombay Duckling – Max Harris
  • 1966 – March of the Mods – Tony Carr
  • 1967 – The Power Game – Wayne Hill
  • 1968 – Love in the Open Air – Paul McCartney
  • 1969 – Ring of Kerry – Peter Hope
  • 1971 – March from the Colour Suite – Gordon Langford
  • 1975 – Four Dances from Aladdin – Ernest Tomlinson
  • 1976 – Introduction and Air to a Stained Glass Window – John Gregory
  • 1977 – Rain Forest – Biddu
  • 1978 – Cavatina – Stanley Myers
  • 1979 – Song For Guy – Elton John
  • 1980 – War of the Worlds – Jeff Wayne and Gary Osborne

Best Comedy Song

  • 1956 – Got’n Idea – Paddy Roberts and Jack Woodman
  • 1958 – Three Brothers – Paddy Roberts
  • 1959 – I’m So Ashamed – Ken Hare
  • 1960 – The Ballad of Bethnal Green – Paddy Roberts
  • 1964 – Flash, Bang, Wallop – David Heneker
  • 1966 – A Windmill In Old Amsterdam – Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge
  • 1967 – Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy? – Allan Smethurst
  • 1968 – Grocer Jack – Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • 1969 – I’m the Urban Spaceman – Neil Innes
  • 1971 – Grandad – Herbie Flowers and Ken Pickett
  • 1972 – Ernie – Benny Hill
  • 1973 – The People Tree – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1974 – Nice One Cyril – Helen Clarke and Harold Spiro

Best Swing / Rhythm Composition

  • 1956 – Big City Suite – Ralph Dollimore
  • 1957 – Itinerary of an Orchestra – Johnny Dankworth and Dave Lindup
  • 1958 – Overdrive – Tommy Watt

Best Jazz Work

  • 1959 – The Colonel’s Tune – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1960 – Beaulieu Festival Suite – Kenny Graham
  • 1961 – Apache – Jerry Lordan
  • 1962 – African Waltz – Galt Macdermot
  • 1963 – Outbreak of Murder – Gordon Franks
  • 1964 – What the Dickens – Johnny Dankworth

Best Beat Song

  • 1966 – It’s Not Unusual – Gordon Mills and Les Reed
  • 1969 – Build Me Up Buttercup – Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • 1974 – Rubber Bullets – Lol Crème, Kevin Godley and Graham Gouldman

Best Ballad or Romantic Song

  • 1969 – I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten – Clive Westlake
  • 1971 – Home Lovin’ Man – Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway and Tony Macaulay
  • 1972 – No Matter How I Try – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1973 – The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face – Ewan MacColl
  • 1974 – Won’t Somebody Dance with Me – Lynsey De Paul

The Best Pop Song

  • 1971 – Love Grows – Tony Macaulay and Barry Mason
  • 1972 – Simple Game – Mike Pinder
  • 1973 – Oh Babe What Could I Say – Hurricane Smith
  • 1974 – You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me – Tony Macaulay and Geoff Stephens
  • 1975 – Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas
  • 1976 – I’m Not In Love – Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 1977 – Don’t Go Breaking My Heart – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Baker Street – Gerry Rafferty
  • 1980 – I Don’t Like Mondays – Bob Geldof
  • 1981 – Stop the Cavalry – Jona Lewie
  • 1982 – Every Little Thing She Does is Magic – Sting
  • 1983 – Our House – Carl Smyth and Chris Foreman
  • 1984 – Karma Chameleon – Boy George, John Moss, Michael Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett

Best Middle of the Road Song

  • 1976 – Harry – Catherine Howe
  • 1977 – Music – John Miles

The Ivors Dance Award

  • 1998 – You’re Not Alone – Tim Kellett and Robin Taylor-Firth
  • 1999 – Horny – Mousse T and Errol Rennalls
  • 2000 – Re-Rewind – Mark Hill/Craig David
  • 2001 – Woman Trouble – Mark Hill, Craig David, Robbie Craig and Pete Devereux
  • 2002 – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head – Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis
  • 2003 – Lazy – Ashley Beedle, Darren House, Darren Rock and David Byrne
  • 2004 – Strict Machine – Alison Goldfrapp, Will Gregory and Nick Batt

Musicals, Films, Television, Radio, and Video Games

The Best Song From a Musical

  • 1956 – Salad Days – Dorothy Reynolds and Julian Slade
  • 1958 – Free as Air – Dorothy Reynolds, Julian Slade
  • 1960 – Lock Up Your Daughters – Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson
  • 1961 – Oliver! – Lionel Bart
  • 1962 – Stop the World I Want to Get Off – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1966 – Charlie Girl – David Heneker and John Taylor
  • 1972 – I Don’t Know How To Love Him – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best British Musical

  • 1963 – Summer Holiday – Brian Bennett, Stanley Black, Ronald Cass, Mike Conlin, Hank Marvin, Peter Myers, Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • 1965 – Robert and Elizabeth – Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar
  • 1974 – Jesus Christ Superstar – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1975 – Treasure Island – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1976 – Great Expectations – Cyril Ornadel and Hal Shaper
  • 1978 – Privates on Parade – Denis King and Peter Nicholls
  • 1979 – Evita – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1980 – Songbook – Monty Norman and Julian Mo
  • 1982 – Cats – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn
  • 1983 – Windy City – Tony Macaulay and Dick Vosburgh
  • 1984 – Blood Brothers – Willie Russell
  • 1985 – The Hired Man – Howard Goodall
  • 1986 – Me and My Girl – Reginald Armitage and Douglas Furber
  • 1987 – The Phantom of the Opera – Charles Hart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe
  • 1990 – Aspects of Love – Don Black, Charles Hart and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1992 – Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

Best Film Score Theme or Song

  • 1957 – The March Hare – Philip Green
  • 1959 – Inn of the Sixth Happiness – Malcolm Arnold
  • 1967 – Born Free – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1973 – Diamonds Are Forever – John Barry and Don Black
  • 1978 – How Deep Is Your Love – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1979 – Bright Eyes – Mike Batt
  • 1980 – Caravans – Mike Batt
  • 1981 – Xanadu – Jeff Lynne
  • 1982 – The French Lieutenant’s Woman – Carl Davis
  • 1983 – For All Mankind – Ravi Shankar and George Fenton
  • 1984 – Going Home – Mark Knopfler
  • 1985 – We All Stand Together – Paul McCartney
  • 1986 – We Don’t Need Another Hero – Graham Lyle and Terry Britten
  • 1987 – Sweet Freedom – Rod Temperton
  • 1988 – Cry Freedom – George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa
  • 1989 – Two Hearts – Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier
  • 1990 – Henry V Nons Nobis Domine – Patrick Doyle
  • 1991 – Witches – Stanley Myers
  • 1992 – Under Suspicion – Christopher Gunning
  • 1993 – Tears in Heaven – Eric Clapton and Will Jennings
  • 1994 – The Piano – Michael Nyman
  • 1995 – Circle of Life – Elton John and Tim Rice
  • 1996 – Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman – Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange, Michael Kamen and Bryan Adams
  • 1998 – Picture of You – Paul Wilson, Andy Watkins, Ronan Keating and Eliot Kennedy
  • 1999 – The Flame Still Burns – Chris Difford, Marti Frederiksen and Mick Jones

Best Original Film Score

  • 1968 – Doctor Dolittle – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1969 – Madwoman of Caillot – Michael Lewis
  • 1976 – Murder on the Orient Express – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 1979 – The Silent Witness – Alan Hawkshaw
  • 1995 – Shadowlands – George Fenton
  • 1996 – Don Juan De Marco – Michael Kamen
  • 1997 – 101 Dalmatians – Michael Kamen
  • 1998 – William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet – Craig Armstrong, Marius De Vries and Nellee Hooper
  • 1999 – Firelight – Christopher Gunning
  • 2000 – The World Is Not Enough – David Arnold
  • 2001 – X-Men – Michael Kamen
  • 2002 – Shrek – Harry Gregson-Williams and John Powell
  • 2003 – The Quiet American – Craig Armstrong
  • 2004 – Max – Dan Jones
  • 2005 – Enduring Love – Jeremy Sams
  • 2006 – Evil – Francis Shaw
  • 2007 – Ice Age: The Meltdown – John Powell
  • 2008 – Atonement – Dario Marianelli
  • 2009 – There Will Be Blood – Jonny Greenwood
  • 2010 – Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs – John Powell
  • 2011 – How To Train Your Dragon – John Powell
  • 2012 – The First Grader – Alex Heffes
  • 2013 – Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
  • 2014 – The Epic of Everest – Simon Fisher Turner
  • 2015 – ‘71 – David Holmes
  • 2016 – Ex_Machina – Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury
  • 2017 – Kubo and the Two Strings – Dario Marianelli
  • 2018 – Jackie – Mica Levi

Best Television or Radio Theme or Song

  • 1962 – The Maigret Theme – Ron Grainer
  • 1963 – Steptoe and Son – Ron Grainer
  • 1964 – Theme from ‘The Avengers’ – Johnny Dankworth
  • 1965 – Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life – Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin
  • 1971 – Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mr Hitler – Jimmy Perry and Derek Taverner
  • 1974 – Galloping Home – Denis King
  • 1975 – No Honestly! – Lynsey De Paul
  • 1976 – The Edwardians (Upstairs, Downstairs Theme) – Alexander Faris
  • 1977 – Sam – John McCabe
  • 1978 – Poldark – Kenyon Emrys-Roberts
  • 1979 – Lillie – Joseph Horovitz
  • 1980 – Nunc Dimittis – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1981 – I Could Be So Good for You – Gerard Kenny and Patricia Waterman
  • 1982 – Brideshead Revisited – Geoffrey Burgon
  • 1983 – Theme From Harry’s Game – Paul Brennan
  • 1984 – That’s Livin’ Alright – David Mackay and Ken Ashby
  • 1985 – Jewel in the Crown – George Fenton
  • 1986 – Edge of Darkness – Eric Clapton and Michael Kamen
  • 1987 – The Monocled Mutineer – George Fenton
  • 1988 – Fortunes of War – Richard Holmes
  • 1989 – Testament – Nigel Hess
  • 1990 – Ruth Rendell Mysteries – Brian Bennett
  • 1991 – Victorian Kitchen – Paul Reade
  • 1992 – Darling Buds of May – Philip Burley and Barrie Guard
  • 1993 – Civvies – Michael Storey
  • 1994 – Stalag Luft – Stanley Myers
  • 1995 – Middlemarch – Stanley Myers
  • 1996 – The Hanging Gale – Shaun Davey
  • 1997 – Hetty Wainthropp Investigates – Nigel Hess
  • 1998 – Rebecca – Christopher Gunning
  • 1999 – Close Relations – Rob Lane
  • 2000 – Trial By Fire – Richard G Mitchell
  • 2001 – Gormenghast – Richard Rodney Bennett
  • 2002 – The Blue Planet – George Fenton

Best Television or Radio Soundtrack

  • 1973 – Colditz – Robert Farnon
  • 2003 – Feltham Sings – Dextrous and Simon Armitage
  • 2004 – The Young Visitors – Nicholas Hooper
  • 2005 – Blackpool – Rob Lane
  • 2006 – Elizabeth I – Rob Lane
  • 2007 – The Virgin Queen – Martin Phipps
  • 2008 – Oliver Twist – Martin Phipps
  • 2009 – Wallace and Gromit (A Matter of Loaf and Death) – Julian Nott
  • 2010 – Desperate Romantics – Daniel Pemberton
  • 2011 – Any Human Heart – Dan Jones
  • 2012 – The Shadow Line – Martin Phipps
  • 2013 – Lucian Freud: Painted Life – John Harle
  • 2014 – Ripper Street – Dominik Scherrer
  • 2015 – The Honourable Woman – Natalie Holt and Martin Phipps
  • 2016 – London Spy – Keefus Ciancia and David Holmes
  • 2017 – War and Peace – Martin Phipps
  • 2018 – The Miniaturist – Dan Jones

Best Theme from a Commercial

  • 1990 – Abbey Endings (Abbey National) – Lionel Bart
  • 1991 – Only You (Fiat Tempra) – Geoff MacCormack and Simon Goldenberg
  • 1992 – Driven By You (Ford Motor Company) – Brian May

Best Original Video Game Score

  • 2010 – Killzone 2 – Joris de Man
  • 2011 – Napoleon: Total War – Richard Beddow, Richard Birdsall and Ian Livingstone
  • 2018 – Horizon Zero Dawn – Joris de Man, Joe Henson and Alexis Smith
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Ivor Novello Awards Winners 1956-2018 (Part One)

Let’s take a final look at the history of the Ivor Novello Awards, by trying to summarise the winners by award category. As they should, these have evolved somewhat over the years, and many have changed their name, so I’ve tried to reconcile them into a single category if they’re roughly the same. I’ve generally tried to use the most recent name in each instance.

Best Song or Album

PRS for Music Most Performed Work

  • 1956 – Ev’rywhere – Tolchard Evans and Jack Fishman
  • 1957 – My September Love – Tolchard Evans and Richard Mullen *
  • 1958 – We Will Make Love – Russ Hamilton *
  • 1959 – Trudie – Joe Henderson *
  • 1960 – Side Saddle – Russ Conway *
  • 1961 – As Long As He Needs Me – Lionel Bart *
  • 1962 – My Kind of Girl – Leslie Bricusse
  • 1963 – Stranger on the Shore – Acker Bilk
  • 1964 – She Loves You – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1965 – Can’t Buy Me Love – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1966 – I’ll Never Find Another You – Tom Springfield
  • 1967 – Michelle – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1968 – Puppet on a String – Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • 1969 – Congratulations – Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • 1970 – Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1971 – Yellow River – Jeff Christie
  • 1972 – My Sweet Lord – George Harrison
  • 1973 – Beg Steal or Borrow – Tony Cole, Graeme Hall and Steve Wolfe
  • 1974 – Get Down – Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1975 – Wombling Song – Mike Batt
  • 1976 – I’m Not In Love – Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart
  • 1977 – Save Your Kisses For Me – Tony Hiller, Martin Lee and Lee Sheriden *
  • 1978 – Don’t Cry for Me Argentina – Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1979 – Night Fever – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1980 – Bright Eyes – Mike Batt
  • 1981 – Together We Are Beautiful – Ken Leray
  • 1982 – You Drive Me Crazy – Ronnie Harwood
  • 1983 – Golden Brown – Jean J. Burnell, Hugh Cornwell, Jet Black and David Greenfield
  • 1984 – Every Breath You Take – Sting
  • 1985 – Careless Whisper – George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley
  • 1986 – Easy Lover – Phillip Bailey, Phil Collins and Nathan East
  • 1987 – Chain Reaction – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1988 – Never Gonna Give You Up – Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman
  • 1989 – I Should Be So Lucky – Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman
  • 1990 – This Time I Know It’s For Real – Mike Stock, Matt Aiken, Pete Waterman and Donna Summer
  • 1991 – Blue Savannah – Andy Bell and Vince Clarke
  • 1992 – I’m Too Sexy – Fred Fairbrass, Rob Manzoli and Richard Fairbrass
  • 1993 – Deeply Dippy – Fred Fairbrass, Rob Manzoli and Richard Fairbrass
  • 1994 – Ordinary World – Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes, John Taylor and Warren Cuccurullo
  • 1995 – Love is All Around – Reg Presley
  • 1996 – Back For Good – Gary Barlow
  • 1997 – Fast Love – George Michael
  • 1998 – I’ll Be Missing You (Every Breath You Take) – Sting
  • 1999 – Angels – Robbie Williams and Guy Chambers
  • 2000 – Beautiful Stranger – William Orbit and Madonna
  • 2001 – Pure Shores – Shaznay Lewis and William Orbit
  • 2002 – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head – Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis
  • 2003 – Just A Little – Michelle Escoffery, John Hammond Hagan, George Hammond Hagan
  • 2004 – Superstar – Mich Hansen, Joseph Belmaati and Mikkel Sigvardt
  • 2005 – Toxic – Cathy Dennis, Bloodshy, Henrik Jonback and Avant
  • 2006 – You’re Beautiful – James Blunt, Amanda Ghost and Sacha Skarbek
  • 2007 – I Don’t Feel Like Dancin’ – Elton John, Scott Hoffman and Jason Sellards
  • 2008 – Shine – Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Mark Owen and Stephen Robson
  • 2009 – Mercy – Steve Booker and Duffy
  • 2010 – The Fear – Lily Allen and Greg Kurstin
  • 2011 – She Said – Eric Appapoulay, Richard Cassell, Ben Drew and Tom Wright-Goss
  • 2012 – Rolling In The Deep – Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth
  • 2013 – Next to Me – Hugo Chegwin, Harry Craze, Anup Paul and Emeli Sandé
  • 2014 – Let Her Go – Mike Rosenberg
  • 2015 – Rather Be – James Napier and Jack Patterson
  • 2016 – Hold Back The River – Iain Archer and James Bay
  • 2017 – Hymn for the Weekend – Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion and Chris Martin
  • 2018 – Shape of You – Steve Mac, Johnny McDaid and Ed Sheeran

Those with an asterisk (*) were awarded jointly as Most Performed Work and Best Selling British Song, as a single award.

Best Selling British Song

  • 1957 – My September Love – Tolchard Evans and Richard Mullen *
  • 1958 – We Will Make Love – Russ Hamilton *
  • 1959 – Trudie – Joe Henderson *
  • 1960 – Side Saddle – Russ Conway *
  • 1961 – As Long As He Needs Me – Lionel Bart *
  • 1962 – Walkin’ Back To Happiness – Michael Hawker and John Schroeder
  • 1963 – Telstar – Joe Meek
  • 1964 – She Loves You – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1965 – Can’t Buy Me Love – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1966 – We Can Work It Out – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1967 – Yellow Submarine – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1968 – The Last Waltz – Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • 1969 – Hey Jude – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1970 – Get Back – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1971 – In the Summertime – Ray Dorset
  • 1972 – My Sweet Lord – George Harrison
  • 1973 – Mouldy Old Dough – Nigel Fletcher and Rob Woodward
  • 1974 – I Love You Love Me Love – Mike Leander
  • 1975 – Tiger Feet – Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn
  • 1976 – Bohemian Rhapsody – Freddie Mercury
  • 1977 – Save Your Kisses For Me – Tony Hiller, Martin Lee and Lee Sheriden *
  • 1978 – Mull of Kintyre – Paul McCartney and Denny Laine
  • 1979 – Night Fever – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1980 – Bright Eyes – Mike Batt
  • 1981 – There’s No One Quite Like Grandma – Gordon Lorenz
  • 1982 – Stand and Deliver – Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni
  • 1983 – Come On Eileen – Kevin Rowland, Kevin Adams and James Paterson
  • 1984 – Karma Chameleon – Boy George, John Moss, Michael Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett
  • 1985 – Do They Know It’s Christmas? – Bob Geldof and Midge Ure
  • 1986 – I Know Him So Well – Tim Rice, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson
  • 1987 – Every Loser Wins – Simon May, Stewart James and Bradley James
  • 1988 – Never Gonna Give You Up – Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman
  • 1989 – Mistletoe & Wine – Leslie Stewart, Jeremy Paul and Keith Strachan
  • 1990 – Too Many Broken Hearts – Mike Stock, Matt Aiken and Pete Waterman
  • 1991 – Sacrifice/Healing Hands – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1992 – Bohemian Rhapsody / These are the Days of Our Lives – Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon
  • 1993 – Would I Lie To You – Mick Leeson and Peter Vale
  • 1994 – Mr Blobby – David Rogers and Paul Shaw
  • 1995 – Love is All Around – Reg Presley
  • 1996 – Back For Good – Gary Barlow
  • 1997 – Wannabe – Victoria Adams, Melanie Brown, Emma Bunton, Melanie Chisholm, Geri Halliwell, Matt Rowe and Richard Stannard
  • 1998 – Candle In The Wind 1997 – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1999 – Believe – Brian Higgins, Steve Torch, Paul Barry, Stuart McLennan, Tim Powell and Matt Gray
  • 2000 – The Millennium Prayer – Paul Field and Stephen Deal
  • 2001 – Can We Fix It – Paul Joyce
  • 2002 – Pure and Simple – Pete Kirtley, Tim Hawes and Alison Clarkson
  • 2003 – Anything Is Possible – Cathy Dennis and Chris Braide
  • 2004 – Mad World – Roland Orzabal
  • 2005 – Do They Know It’s Christmas? – Bob Geldof and Midge Ure
  • 2006 – That’s My Goal – Jorgan Elofsson, Jeremy Godfrey and Bill Padley
  • 2007 – A Moment Like This – Jorgen Elofsson and John Reid
  • 2008 – Beautiful Liar – Ian Dench, Mikkel Eriksen, Amanda Ghost, Tor Erik Hermansen and Beyonce Knowles
  • 2009 – Viva La Vida – Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion and Chris Martin

Those with an asterisk (*) were awarded jointly as Most Performed Work and Best Selling British Song, as a single award.

Best Song Musically and Lyrically

  • 1956 – In Love for the Very First Time – Paddy Roberts and Jack Woodman
  • 1957 – By the Fountains of Rome – Norman Newell and Mátyás Seiber
  • 1958 – A Handful of Songs – Lionel Bart, Michael Pratt and Tommy Steele
  • 1959 – The Wind Cannot Read – Peter Hart
  • 1960 – The Village of St. Bernadette – Eula Parker
  • 1961 – Portrait of My Love – Norman Newell and Cyril Ornadel
  • 1962 – What Kind of Fool Am I? – Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • 1963 – My Love and Devotion – Howard Barnes, Harold Fields and Joe Roncoroni
  • 1964 – If I Ruled The World – Leslie Bricusse and Cyril Ornadel
  • 1965 – Downtown – Tony Hatch
  • 1966 – Yesterday – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1968 – She’s Leaving Home – John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • 1970 – Where Do You Go To My Lovely – Peter Sarstedt
  • 1971 – Something – George Harrison
  • 1972 – Don’t Let It Die – Hurricane Smith
  • 1973 – Without You – Tom Evans and Peter Ham
  • 1974 – Daniel – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1975 – Streets of London – Ralph McTell
  • 1978 – Don’t Cry for Me Argentina – Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1979 – Baker Street – Gerry Rafferty
  • 1980 – The Logical Song – Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson
  • 1981 – Woman in Love – Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1982 – Memory – Andrew Lloyd Webber, T.S. Eliot and Trevor Nunn
  • 1983 – Have You Ever Been in Love – Andy Hill, Pete Sinfield and John Danter
  • 1984 – Every Breath You Take – Sting
  • 1985 – Against All Odds (Take A Look At Me Now) – Phil Collins
  • 1986 – Nikita – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1987 – Don’t Give Up – Peter Gabriel
  • 1988 – Something Inside So Strong – Labi Siffre
  • 1989 – They Dance Alone – Sting
  • 1990 – The Living Years – BA Robertson and Mike Rutherford
  • 1991 – Sacrifice – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1992 – The Whole of the Moon – Mike Scott
  • 1993 – Why – Annie Lennox
  • 1994 – If I Ever Lose My Faith in You – Sting
  • 1995 – Think Twice – Andy Hill andPeter Sinfield
  • 1996 – Common People – Jarvis Cocker, Nick Banks, Candida Doyle, Steve Mackey and Russell Senior
  • 1997 – Too Much Love Will Kill You – Brian May, Frank Musker and Elizabeth Lamers
  • 1998 – Paranoid Android – Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood, Phil Selway, Colin Greenwood and Ed O’Brien
  • 1999 – Believe – Brian Higgins, Stuart McLennan, Paul Barry, Steve Torch, Matt Gray and Tim Powell
  • 2000 – Strong – Robbie Williams and Guy Chambers
  • 2001 – Babylon – David Gray
  • 2002 – Walk On – Adam Clayton, The Edge, Bono and Larry Mullen Jnr
  • 2003 – The Other Side – David Gray
  • 2004 – Leave Right Now – Francis Eg White
  • 2005 – Dry Your Eyes – Mike Skinner
  • 2006 – Suddenly I See – KT Tunstall
  • 2007 – Elusive – Scott Matthews
  • 2008 – Love Is A Losing Game – Amy Winehouse
  • 2009 – One Day Like This – Guy Garvey, Richard Jupp, Craig Potter, Mark Potter and Peter Turner
  • 2010 – The Fear – Lily Allen and Greg Kurstin
  • 2011 – Becoming a Jackal – Conor O’Brien
  • 2012 – The A Team – Ed Sheeran
  • 2013 – Next to Me – Hugo Chegwin, Harry Craze, Anup Paul and Emeli Sandé
  • 2014 – Strong – Dominic Major, Hannah Reid and Daniel Rothman
  • 2015 – Take Me To Church – Andrew Hozier-Byrne
  • 2016 – Wasn’t Expecting That – Jamie Lawson
  • 2017 – Black Man in a White World – Dean ‘Inflo’ Josiah Cover and Michael Kiwanuka
  • 2018 – Magnificent (She Says) – Guy Garvey, Craig Potter, Mark Potter and Pete Turner

International Hit of the Year

  • 1967 – Winchester Cathedral – Geoff Stephens
  • 1968 – A Whiter Shade of Pale – Gary Brooker and Keith Reid
  • 1969 – Delilah – Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • 1970 – Love Is All – Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • 1971 – In the Summertime – Ray Dorset
  • 1972 – Jesus Christ Superstar – Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice
  • 1973 – Without You – Tom Evans and Pete Ham
  • 1974 – Power To All Our Friends – Guy Fletcher and Doug Flett
  • 1975 – The Night Chicago Died – Peter Callander and Mitch Murray
  • 1976 – I’m Not In Love – Graham Gouldman – Eric Stewart
  • 1977 – Save Your Kisses For Me – Tony Hiller, Martin Lee and Lee Sheriden
  • 1978 – Don’t Cry for Me Argentina – Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • 1979 – Stayin’ Alive – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1980 – We Don’t Talk Anymore – Alan Tarney
  • 1981 – Another Brick in the Wall – Roger Waters
  • 1982 – In the Air Tonight – Phil Collins
  • 1983 – Ebony and Ivory – Paul McCartney
  • 1984 – Let’s Dance – David Bowie
  • 1985 – The Reflex – Simon Le Bon, John Taylor, Roger Taylor, Andy Taylor and Nick Rhodes
  • 1986 – 19 – Paul Hardcastle, Mike Oldfield, Bill Couturie and Jonas McCord
  • 1987 – West End Girls – Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe
  • 1988 – Never Gonna Give You Up – Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman
  • 1989 – Faith – George Michael
  • 1990 – She Drives Me Crazy – David Steele and Roland Gift
  • 1991 – All Around the World – Lisa Stansfield, Ian Devaney and Andrew Morris
  • 1992 – Crazy – Seal
  • 1993 – Would I Lie To You – Mick Leeson and Peter Vale
  • 1994 – Living on My Own – Freddie Mercury
  • 1995 – Love is All Around – Reg Presley
  • 1996 – Kiss From A Rose – Seal
  • 1997 – Wannabe – Victoria Adams, Melanie Brown, Emma Bunton, Melanie Chisholm, Geri Halliwell, Matt Rowe and Richard Stannard
  • 1998 – Candle In The Wind 1997 – Elton John and Bernie Taupin
  • 1999 – Believe – Brian Higgins, Stuart McLennan, Paul Barry, Steve Torch, Matt Gray and Tim Powell
  • 2000 – Genie In A Bottle – Pam Sheyne, David Frank and Steve Kipner
  • 2001 – It Feels So Good – Sonique, Linus Burdick, Simon Belofsky and Graeme Pleeth
  • 2002 – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head – Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis
  • 2003 – Complicated – Lauren Christy, David Alspach, Graham Edwards and Avril Lavigne
  • 2004 – White Flag – Dido Armstrong, Rollo Armstrong and Richard Nowels
  • 2005 – Vertigo – Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr
  • 2006 – You’re Beautiful – James Blunt, Amanda Ghost and Sacha Skarbek
  • 2007 – Sorry – Madonna and Stuart Price

Best Lyric

  • 1978 – Matchstalk Men and Matchstalk Cats and Dogs – Michael Coleman and Brian Burke
  • 1979 – The Man with the Child in His Eyes – Kate Bush
  • 1980 – I Don’t Like Mondays – Bob Geldof
  • 1981 – Take That Look Off Your Face – Don Black
  • 1982 – Woman – John Lennon
  • 1983 – Private Investigations – Mark Knopfler

Best Contemporary Song

  • 1985 – Two Tribes – Holly Johnson, Peter Gill and Mark O’Toole
  • 1986 – We Don’t Need Another Hero – Graham Lyle and Terry Britten
  • 1987 – It’s Alright (Baby’s Coming Back) – Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • 1988 – You Win Again – Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • 1989 – Love Changes (Everything) – Simon Climie, Dennis Morgan and Rob Fisher
  • 1990 – All Around the World – Lisa Stansfield, Ian Devaney and Andrew Morris
  • 1991 – Killer – Adam ‘Adamski’ Tinley and Seal
  • 1992 – Crazy – Seal
  • 1993 – Would I Lie To You – Peter Vale and Mick Leeson
  • 1994 – Pray – Gary Barlow
  • 1995 – You Gotta Be – Des’ree Weekes and Ashley Ingram
  • 1996 – Alright – Danny Goffrey, Gaz Coombes and Michael Quinn
  • 1997 – A Design for Life – James Dean Bradfield, Sean Moore and Nicky Wire
  • 1998 – Karma Police – Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood, Phil Selway, Colin Greenwood and Ed O’Brien
  • 1999 – Here’s Where The Story Ends – Harriet Wheeler and David Gavurin
  • 2000 – Why Does It Always Rain On Me – Fran Healy
  • 2001 – Seven Days – Craig David, Mark Hill and Darren Hill
  • 2002 – Shining Light – Tim Wheeler
  • 2003 – Weak Become Heroes – Mike Skinner
  • 2004 – Stronger Than Me – Amy Winehouse and Salaam Remi
  • 2005 – Take Me Out – Robert Hardy, Alex Kapranos, Nick McCarthy and Paul Thomson
  • 2006 – Wires – Joel Pott, Steven Roberts, Timothy Wanstall and Carey Willetts
  • 2007 – Rehab – Amy Winehouse
  • 2008 – People Help The People – Simon Aldred
  • 2009 – Grounds For Divorce – Guy Garvey, Richard Jupp, Craig Potter, Mark Potter and Peter Turner
  • 2010 – Daniel – Natasha Khan
  • 2011 – Pass Out – Timothy McKenzie, Patrick Okogwu and Marc Williams
  • 2012 – Video Games – Lana Del Rey and Justin Parker
  • 2013 – Pelican – Sam Doyle, Rupert Jarvis, Orlando Weeks, Felix White and Hugo White
  • 2014 – Retrograde – James Blake
  • 2015 – Rather Be – James Napier and Jack Patterson
  • 2016 – All My Friends – James Carter, Oliver Lee, Cass Lowe and Chance The Rapper
  • 2017 – Man – Skepta and Josh Homme
  • 2018 – Question Time – Dave and Fraser T Smith

Album Award

  • 2005 – Final Straw – Iain Archer, Nathan Connolly, Gary Lightbody, Mark McClelland and Jonny Quinn
  • 2006 – Employment – Nick Baines, Nick Hodgson, Simon Rix, Andrew White and Ricky Wilson
  • 2007 – Whatever People Say I Am That’s What I’m Not – Alex Turner
  • 2008 – In Rainbows – Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Edward O’Brien, Philip Selway and Thom Yorke
  • 2009 – We Started Nothing – Julian De Martino and Katie White
  • 2010 – Sunny Side Up – Paolo Nutini
  • 2011 – The Defamation of Strickland Banks – Ben Drew
  • 2012 – Let England Shake – PJ Harvey
  • 2013 – An Awesome Wave – Thomas Green, Joe Newman, Gwilym Sainsbury and Augustus Unger-Hamilton
  • 2014 – Push the Sky Away – Nick Cave and Warren Ellis
  • 2015 – So Long, See You Tomorrow – Jack Steadman
  • 2016 – Darling Arithmetic – Conor O’Brien
  • 2017 – The Dreaming Room – Laura Mvula
  • 2018 – Gang Signs & Prayer – Michael ‘Stormzy’ Omari

One-Off and Special Awards

One-Off Awards

  • 1966 – The Year’s Outstanding Contemporary Folk Song – Catch the Wind – Donovan
  • 1970 – The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Arranger / Composer – Ernest Tomlinson
  • 1972 – Entertainment Music – Ron Goodwin
  • 1976 – Best British Work for Children – Captain Noah and His Floating Zoo – Michael Flanders and Joseph Horovitz
  • 1976 – Music Publisher of the Year – Geoffrey Heath
  • 1984 – The Best Rock Song – Let’s Dance – David Bowie
  • 1992 – Award in Recognition of the Exceptional Success of a Single Song – Everything I Do (I Do It For You) – Bryan Adams, Michael Kamen and Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange
  • 1995 – The Radio 1 Award for Continuing Innovation in Music – Brian Eno
  • 2000 – International Achievement in Musical Theatre – Robert Elhai, Elton John, Lebo M, Tsidii Le Loka, Mark Mancina, Jay Rifkin, Tim Rice, Julie Taymor and Hans Zimmer

Special Awards

  • 1956 – A Personal Special Award – Haydn Wood
  • 1961 – Any work which in the opinion of the Judges, is worthy of an Award, but which may not necessarily be governed by Existing Categories – Goodness Gracious Me – Herbert Kretzmer and David Lee
  • 1961 – Special Award – What Do You Want If You Don’t Want Money? – Johnny Worth
  • 1964 – Special Award in Recognition of Fifty Years’ Service to the Music Industry – The Performing Rights Society
  • 1970 – Special Award for Originality – Space Oddity – David Bowie
  • 1970 – Special Award for The Most Contemporary Song – Melting Pot – Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway
  • 1977 – Special Award for the James Bond Theme – Monty Norman
  • 1978 – Special Award – Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • 1979 – Special Award for Services to British Songwriters – Victor Knight
  • 1983 – Special Award for 25 Years In The Music Business – Brian Bennett, Hank Marvin and Bruce Welch
  • 2005 – The Ivors Special Award for Songwriting – Mick Jagger and Keith Richards
  • 2015 – The Ivors Special Anniversary Award – Bob Geldof and Midge Ure

In the second and final part next week, we’ll look at the Artist, Genre or Style-Specific Awards, and awards for Musicals, Films, Television, Radio, and Video Games.

Ivor Novello Awards – The 1980s

After drifting off the rails somewhat in the 1970s, the Ivor Novello Awards started to go back to being about songwriting in the 1980s. Although they still seemed a little more obsessed with Bucks Fizz and Cliff Richard than is really healthy.

Ivor Novello Awards 1980

Grosvenor House, London, hosted the 25th Ivor Novello Award ceremony.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: The Logical Song, performed by Supertramp, written by Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson. Also nominated: Bright Eyes, performed by Art Garfunkel, written by Mike BattWe Don’t Talk Anymore, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Alan Tarney
  • The Best Pop Song: I Don’t Like Mondays, performed by The Boomtown Rats, written by Bob Geldof. Also nominated: Video Killed the Radio Star, performed by Buggles, written by Bruce Woolley, Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes; Off the Wall, performed by Michael Jackson, written by Rodney Temperton
  • The Best Theme from a Radio or Television Production: Nunc Dimittis, written by Geoffrey Burgon. Also nominated: Secret Army, written by Robert FarnonShoestring, written by George Fenton
  • The Best Film Song, Theme or Score: Caravans, written by Mike Batt. Also nominated: Music Machine, written by Leslie Hurdle and Frank RicottiYanks, written by Richard Rodney Bennett
  • The Outstanding British Lyric: I Don’t Like Mondays. Also nominated: He Was Beautiful, performed by Iris Williams, written by Cleo LaineBright Eyes
  • The Best Instrumental or Popular Orchestral Work: War of the Worlds, written by Jeff Wayne and Gary Osborne. Also nominated: The Valley of Swords, written by Mike BattAfrican Sanctus, written by David Fanshawe
  • The International Hit of the Year: We Don’t Talk Anymore, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Alan Tarney. Also nominated: Too Much Heaven, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice GibbI Don’t Like Mondays
  • The Most Performed Work: Bright Eyes. Also nominated: We Don’t Talk Anymore; Cavatina, performed by John Williams, written by Stanley Myers
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Bright Eyes. Also nominated: I Don’t Like MondaysAnother Brick in the Wall (Part 2), performed by Pink Floyd, written by Roger Waters
  • The Best British Musical: Songbook, written by Monty Norman and Julian More. Also nominated: A Day in Hollywood, A Night in the Ukraine, written by Dick Vosburgh and Frank Lazarus
  • Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Robert Mayer
  • Songwriter of the Year: Ben Findon
  • Special Award for International Achievement: Paul McCartney
  • Special Award for Lifetime Achievement: Edgar Yipsel Harburg and Jimmy Kennedy

Ivor Novello Awards 1981

The 26th Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Woman in Love, performed by Barbara Streisand, written by Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb. Also nominated: Babooshka, written by Kate BushTogether We Are Beautiful, performed by Fern Kinney, written by Ken LerayYour Ears Should be Burning Now, performed by Marti Webb, written by Tony Macaulay and Don Black
  • The Best Pop Song: Stop the Cavalry, written by Jona Lewie. Also nominated: Don’t Stand So Close to Me, performed by The Police, written by StingWhat You’re Proposing, performed by Status Quo, written by Francis Rossi and Bernard Frost
  • The Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: I Could Be So Good for You, written by Gerard Kenny and Patricia Waterman. Also nominated: Fox, written by George FentonJuliet Bravo, written by J.S. Bach and arranged by Derek Goom
  • The Best Film Song, Theme or Score: Xanadu, written by Jeff Lynne. Also nominated: Flash, written by Brian MaySilver Dream Machine, written by David Essex
  • The Outstanding British Lyric: Take That Look Off Your Face, performed by Marti Webb, written by Don Black. Also nominated: Stop the Cavalry, written by Jona LewieWoman in Love, performed by Barbara Streisand, written by Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • The International Hit of the Year: Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2). Also nominated: Woman in LoveAnother One Bites the Dust, performed by Queen, written by John Deacon
  • The Most Performed Work: Together We Are Beautiful. Also nominated: January, February, performed by Barbara Dickson, written by Alan TarneyI’m In The Mood for Dancing, performed by The Nolan Sisters, written by Ben Findon, Michael Myers and Robert Puzey
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: There’s No One Quite Like Grandma, performed by St. Winifred’s School Choir, written by Gordon Lorenz. Also nominated: Woman in LoveDon’t Stand So Close to Me
  • Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: William Walton
  • Special Award for Outstanding Contribution to British Music: John Lennon
  • Songwriter of the Year: Ben Findon

Ivor Novello Awards 1982

The 27th Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Memory, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber, T.S. Eliot and Trevor Nunn. Also nominated: Woman, written by John LennonThe Land of Make Believe, performed by Bucks Fizz, written by Andy Hill and Pete Sinfield
  • The Best Pop Song: Every Little Thing She Does is Magic, performed by The Police, written by Sting. Also nominated: Don’t You Want Me, performed by The Human League, written by Phil Oakey, Adrian Wright and Jo Callis; Wired for Sound, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Alan Tarney and BA Robertson
  • The Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: Brideshead Revisited, written by Geoffrey Burgon. Also nominated: Flame Trees of Thika, written by Ken Howard and Alan BlaikleyShillingbury Tales, written by Ed Welch
  • The Best Film Theme or Song: The French Lieutenant’s Woman, written by Carl Davis. Also nominated: Without Your Love, written by Billy Nicholls; For Your Eyes Only, written by Bill Conti and Mick Leeson
  • The Outstanding British Lyric: Woman. Also nominated: The One That You Love, performed by Air Supply, written by Graham Russell; When He Shines, performed by Sheena Easton, written by Florrie Palmer and Dominic Bugatti
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Stand and Deliver, performed by Adam and the Ants, written by Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni. Also nominated: Vienna, performed by Ultravox, written by Billy Currie, Chris Cross, Warren Cann and Midge UreDon’t You Want Me
  • The International Hit of the Year: In the Air Tonight, written by Phil Collins. Also nominated: (Just Like) Starting Over, written by John Lennon; Woman in Love; Every Little Thing She Does is Magic
  • The Most Performed Work: You Drive Me Crazy, performed by Shakin’ Stevens, written by Ronnie Harwood. Also nominated: Woman
  • Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Lennox Berkeley
  • The Best British Musical: Cats, written by: Andrew Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn
  • Songwriters of the Year: Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni
  • Special Award for Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Kenney Jones, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend

Ivor Novello Awards 1983

The 28th Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Have You Ever Been in Love, written by Andy Hill, Pete Sinfield and John Danter. Also nominated: Now Those Days Are Gone, performed by Bucks Fizz, written by Andy Hill and Nichola Martin; Heartbreaker, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • The Best Pop Song: Our House, performed by Madness, written by Carl Smyth and Chris Foreman. Also nominated: I Don’t Wanna Dance, written by Eddy Grant; Come On Eileen, performed by Dexys Midnight Runners, written by Kevin Rowland, Kevin Adams and James Paterson
  • The Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: Theme From Harry’s Game, composed by Paul Brennan. Also nominated: Omnibus, composed by George Fenton; Smiley’s People, composed by Patrick Gowers
  • The Best Film Theme or Song: For All Mankind, composed by Ravi Shankar and George Fenton. Also nominated: Time and Tide, composed by Alan Price; Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)
  • The Outstanding British Lyric: Private Investigations, performed by Dire Straits, written by Mark Knopfler. Also nominated: The Dreaming, written by Kate Bush; Have You Ever Been in Love
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Come On Eileen. Also nominated: Do You Really Want to Hurt Me, performed by Culture Club, written by Boy George, Michael Craig, John Moss and Roy Hay; Ebony and Ivory, written by Paul McCartney and performed with Stevie Wonder
  • The International Hit of the Year: Ebony and Ivory. Also nominated: Heartbreaker; Don’t You Want Me
  • The Most Performed Work: Golden Brown, performed by The Stranglers, written by Jean J. Burnell, Hugh Cornwell, Jet Black and David Greenfield. Also nominated: Oh Julie, written by Shakin’ Stevens; Love Plus One, performed by Haircut 100, written by Nick Heyward
  • The Best British Musical: Windy City, written by: Tony Macaulay and Dick Vosburgh
  • Lifetime Achievement in British Music: Vivian Ellis
  • Songwriter of the Year: Andy Hill
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford
  • Special Award for 25 Years In The Music Business: Brian Bennett, Hank Marvin and Bruce Welch

Ivor Novello Awards 1984

The 29th Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • The Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Every Breath You Take, performed by The Police, written by Sting. Also nominated: Pipes of Peace, written by Paul McCartney; True, performed by Spandau Ballet, written by Gary Kemp
  • The Best Pop Song: Karma Chameleon, performed by Culture Club, written by Boy George, John Moss, Michael Craig, Roy Hay and Phil Pickett. Also nominated: Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This), performed by Eurythmics, written by Annie Lennox and Dave StewartThriller, performed by Michael Jackson, written by Rod Temperton
  • The Best Rock Song: Let’s Dance, written by David Bowie. Also nominated: Every Breath You TakeOwner of a Lonely Heart, performed by Yes, written by Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire and Trevor Horn
  • The Best Theme from a TV or Radio Production: That’s Livin’ Alright, composed by David Mackay and Ken Ashby. Also nominated: The Late Late Breakfast Show, composed by Gary Kemp; Partners in Crime, composed by Joseph Horovitz
  • The Best Film Theme or Song: Going Home, written by Mark Knopfler. Also nominated: Walking in the Air, written by Howard BlakeAll Time High, written by Tim Rice and John Barry
  • The Best British Musical: Blood Brothers, written by Willie Russell. Also nominated: Poppy, written by Pete Nichols and Monty NormanMr Cinders, written by Clifford Grey, Greatrex Newman, Leo Robin, Vivian Ellis and Richard Myers
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Karma Chameleon. Also nominated: Only You, performed by Yazoo, written by Vince Clarke; Let’s Dance, written by David Bowie
  • The Most Performed Work: Every Breath You Take. Also nominated: Karma ChameleonMoonlight Shadow, written by Mike Oldfield
  • The International Hit of the Year: Let’s Dance, written by David Bowie. Also nominated: Every Breath You TakeKarma Chameleon
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Andrew Lloyd Webber
  • Songwriters of the Year: Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Andy Brown, Peter Kircher, Alan Lancaster, Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi

Ivor Novello Awards 1985

The 30th Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • Best Contemporary Song: Two Tribes, performed by Frankie Goes to Hollywood, written by Holly Johnson, Peter Gill and Mark O’Toole. Also nominated: I Won’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me, written by Nik Kershaw; Relax, performed by Frankie Goes to Hollywood, written by Holly Johnson, Peter Gill and Mark O’Toole
  • Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Against All Odds (Take A Look At Me Now), written by Phil Collins. Also nominated: Careless Whisper, performed by Wham!, written by George Michael and Andrew RidgeleyI Should have Known Better, written by Jim Diamond and Graham Lyle
  • Best Theme from a TV or Radio Production: Jewel in the Crown, written by George Fenton. Also nominated: Another Six English Towns, written by Jim Parker; Kennedy, written by Richard Hartley
  • Best Film Theme or Song: We All Stand Together, written by Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Champions, written by Carl Davis; Company of Wolves, written by George Fenton
  • Best British Musical: The Hired Man, words and music by Howard Goodall. Also nominated: Starlight Express, written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe; The Boyfriend, written by Sandy Wilson
  • Most Performed Work: Careless Whisper. Also nominated: Two Tribes; I Won’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me
  • The Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Do They Know It’s Christmas?, performed by Band Aid, written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure
  • International Hit of the Year: The Reflex, performed by Duran Duran, written by Simon Le Bon, John Taylor, Roger Taylor, Andy Taylor and Nick Rhodes. Also nominated: Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run), written by Billie Ocean and Keith Diamond; Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go, performed by Wham!, written by George Michael
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Michael Tippett
  • Songwriter of the Year: George Michael
  • The Jimmy Kennedy Award: Tommie Connor
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, John Lodge, Patrick Moraz and Ray Thomas

Ivor Novello Awards 1986

The 31st Ivor Novello Awards were held at Grosvenor House, London.

  • Best Contemporary Song: We Don’t Need Another Hero (Thunderdome), performed by Tina Turner, written by Graham Lyle and Terry Britten. Also nominated: 19, written by Paul Hardcastle, Mike Oldfield, Bill Couturie and Jonas McCord; Money for Nothing, performed by Dire Straits, written by Mark Knopfler and Sting; Running Up That Hill, written by Kate Bush
  • Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Nikita, written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin. Also nominated: I Want To Know What Love Is, performed by Foreigner, written by Mick Jones; Everybody Wants to Rule the World, performed by Tears for Fears, written by Roland Orzabal, Ian Stanley and Chris HughesI Know Him So Well, performed by Elaine Page, written by Tim Rice, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson
  • The Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: Edge of Darkness, written by Eric Clapton and Michael Kamen. Also nominated: The Last Place on Earth, written by Trevor Jones; Eastenders, written by Leslie Osborne and Simon May
  • The Best Film Theme or Song: We Don’t Need Another Hero, written by Graham Lyle and Terry Britten. Also nominated: Hit That Perfect Beat, written by John Foster, Steve Bronski and Larry SteinbachekA View to a Kill, written by Duran Duran and John Barry
  • The Best British Musical: Me and My Girl, written by Reginald Armitage and Douglas Furber. Also nominated: Lennon, written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon; Mutiny, written by David Essex and Richard Crane
  • Most Performed Work: Easy Lover, written by: Phillip Bailey, Phil Collins and Nathan East
  • Best Selling ‘A’ Side: I Know Him So Well. Also nominated: 19; Easy Lover
  • International Hit of the Year: 19. Also nominated: Shout, performed by Tears for Fears, written by Roland Orzabal and Ian Stanley; A View to a Kill, written by Duran Duran and John Barry
  • The Jimmy Kennedy Award: Lionel Bart
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Malcolm Arnold
  • Songwriter of the Year: Roland Orzabal
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Elton John

Ivor Novello Awards 1987

The 1987 Ivor Novello Awards took place on 15th April at Grosvenor House, London.

  • Best Contemporary Song: It’s Alright (Baby’s Coming Back), performed by Eurythmics, written by Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart. Also nominated: West End Girls, performed by Pet Shop Boys, written by Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe; Sledgehammer, written by Peter Gabriel
  • Best Song Musically and Lyrically: Don’t Give Up, written by Peter Gabriel. Also nominated: All I Ask of You, written by Charles Hart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe; The Miracle of Love, performed by Eurythmics, written by Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Every Loser Wins, written by Simon May, Stewart James and Bradley James. Also nominated: Chain Reaction, written by Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb; Living Doll, written by Lionel Bart
  • Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: The Monocled Mutineer, written by George Fenton. Also nominated: Theme from Lost Empires, written by Derek Hilton; Time After Time, written by Rod Argent and Robert Howes
  • Most Performed Work: Chain Reaction, performed by Diana Ross, written by: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb
  • International Hit of the Year: West End Girls. Also nominated: Nikita, written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin; The Edge of Heaven, performed by Wham!, written by George Michael
  • Best Film Theme or Song: Sweet Freedom, written by Rod Temperton. Also nominated: A Kind of Magic, written by Roger Taylor; In Too Deep, written by Tony Banks, Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford
  • The Best British Musical: The Phantom of the Opera, written by Charles Hart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe. Also nominated: Chess, written by Tim Rice, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson; Charlie Girl, written by David Heneker and John Taylor
  • The Jimmy Kennedy Award: Hugh Charles
  • Songwriters of the Year: Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Yehudi Menuhin
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: John Deacon, Freddie Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor

Ivor Novello Awards 1988

The 1988 Ivor Novello Awards took place on 7th April at Grosvenor House, London.

  • Best Contemporary Song: You Win Again, performed by Bee Gees, written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb. Also nominated: Never Gonna Give You Up, performed by Rick Astley, written by Stock Aitken Waterman (Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman); What Have I Done to Deserve This?, performed by Pet Shop Boys with Dusty Springfield, written by Chris Lowe, Neil Tennant and Allee Willis
  • Best Song Musically and Lyrically: (Something Inside) So Strong, written by Labi Siffre. Also nominated: I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me), performed by Aretha Franklin and George Michael, written by Simon Climie and Dennis Morgan; Throwing It All Away, written by Tony Banks, Phil Collins and Michael Rutherford
  • Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Never Gonna Give You Up. Also nominated: You Win Again; China in Your Hand, performed by T’Pau, written by Carol Decker and Ronald Rogers
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: David Heneker
  • Best Theme from a Television or Radio Production: Fortunes of War, written by Richard Holmes. Also nominated: Neighbours, written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent; My Family and Other Animals, written by Daryl Runswick
  • Most Performed Work: Never Gonna Give You Up. Also nominated: Respectable, performed by Mel and Kim, written by Stock Aitken Waterman; Living in a Box, performed by Living in a Box, written by Marcus Vere and Steve Pigott
  • International Hit of the Year: Never Gonna Give You Up, written by Stock Aitken Waterman. Also nominated: It’s a Sin, performed by Pet Shop Boys, written by Chris Lowe and Neil Tennant; I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)
  • Best Film Score Theme or Song: Cry Freedom, written by George Fenton and Jonas Gwangwa. Also nominated: The Living Daylights, written by John Barry and Pal Waaktaar; Theme from Castaway, written by Stanley Myers
  • The Jimmy Kennedy Award: Norman Newell
  • Songwriters of the Year: Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb and Robin Gibb

Ivor Novello Awards 1989

The 1989 Ivor Novello Awards were held on 4th April at Grosvenor House, London.

  • Best Contemporary Song: Love Changes (Everything), written by Simon Climie, Dennis Morgan and Rob Fisher. Also nominated: A Little Respect, performed by Erasure, written by Andy Bell and Vince Clarke; Father Figure, written by George Michael
  • Best Song Musically and Lyrically: They Dance Alone (Cueca Solo), written by Sting. Also nominated: Perfect, performed by Fairground Attraction, written by Mark Nevin; Mary’s Prayer, performed by Danny Wilson, written by Gary Clark
  • Best Selling ‘A’ Side: Mistletoe & Wine, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Leslie Stewart, Jeremy Paul and Keith Strachan. Also nominated: Especially for You, performed by Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan, written by Stock Aitken Waterman; I Should Be So Lucky, performed by Kylie Minogue, written by Stock Aitken Waterman
  • Most Performed Work: I Should Be So Lucky. Also nominated: Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car, written by Billy Ocean and Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange; Love Changes (Everything)
  • Best Theme from a TV or Radio Production: Testament, written by Nigel Hess. Also nominated: The Long March, written by Christopher Gunning; Young Musician of the Year, written by Edward Gregson
  • Best Film Theme or Song: Two Hearts, written by Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier. Also nominated: A Fish Called Wanda, written by Trevor Jones and  John Du Prez; Childhood Days, written by Barry Gibb and Maurice Gibb
  • International Hit of the Year: Faith, written by George Michael. Also nominated: I Should Be So Lucky; Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car
  • Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Mark Knopfler and John Illsley
  • Songwriters of the Year: George Michael and Matt Aitken, Mike Stock and Peter Waterman (presented jointly)
  • The Jimmy Kennedy Award: Leslie Bricusse
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Paul McCartney
  • Lifetime Achievement: Cliff Richard

Further Reading

Ivor Novello Awards – The 1960s

Before we launch into the “Ivors” from the sixties, a quick word about the credits here. The Ivor Novello Awards are, unusually and entirely laudably, given for songwriting rather than performing, but that isn’t necessarily compatible with most people understand music. In the interests of context, I’ve therefore added performer names where I know them (but I didn’t bother researching them in a lot of detail, so please comment below if you see things you feel need changing!)

Apart from the usual pop suspects, it’s great to see awards and nominations for John Barry and Ron Grainer in amongst these lists!

Ivor Novello Awards 1960

The fifth Ivor Novello Awards were broadcast on BBC Television on 6th June 1960, with Eric Robinson conducting the Orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: Side Saddle, written by Russ Conway. Also nominated: Living Doll, by Lionel Bart
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: The Village of St. Bernadette, written by Eula Parker. Also nominated: Maybe This Year, by Ronald Wakley and Marcel Stellman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Item: The Ballad of Bethnal Green, written by Paddy Roberts. Also nominated: Little White Bull, by Michael Pratt, Lionel Bart and Tommy Steele
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Beaulieu Festival Suite, written by Kenny Graham. Also nominated: Jazzboatby Joe Henderson
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Windows of Parish, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Ring Ding, by Steve Race
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Lock Up Your Daughters, written by Lionel Bart and Laurie Johnson. Also nominated: Meet The Familyby Peter Greenwell and Peter Wildeblood
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Lionel Bart

Ivor Novello Awards 1961

The 1961 ceremony was presented by W.E. Butlin, and broadcast on BBC Television on 20th May 1961. The broadcast was introduced by David Jacobs, and starred Max Bygraves, Georgia Brown, Matt Monro, Craig Douglas, Bert Weedon, Paddy Roberts, Max Harris and Douglas Gamley. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra which was led by David McCallum.

  • The Best Selling and Most Performed Song of the Year: As Long As He Needs Me, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: Apache, performed by The Shadows, written by Jerry Lordan
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: Portrait Of My Love, written by Norman Newell and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: As Long As He Needs Me, by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: Seashore, written by Robert Farnon. Also nominated: The Willow Waltz, by Cyril Watters
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in Jazz or Beat Idiom: Apache. Also nominated: Hit and Miss, by John Barry
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contribution to the Score of a Stage Play, Film, TV Programme or Radio Production: Oliver, written by Lionel Bart. Also nominated: The Gurney Slade Theme, by Max Harris
  • Judges’ Choice Award (any work which in the opinion of the Judges, is worthy of an Award, but which may not necessarily be governed by Existing Categories): Goodness Gracious Me, written by Herbert Kretzmer and David Lee. Also nominated: The Belle of Barking Creek, by Paddy Roberts
  • Outstanding Personal Services to British Popular Music: Eric Maschwitz
  • Special Award: What Do You Want If You Don’t Want Money?, written by Johnny Worth

Ivor Novello Awards 1962

W.E. Butlin turned up again for the 1962 ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 13th May 1962. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Cliff Richard and The Shadows, Anthony Newley, Helen Shapiro and Her Hair, Matt Monro, Johnny Dankworth and His Orchestra, Tony Osborne, Ron Grainer and The Ivor Raymonde Singers. Eric Robinson conducted the orchestra, led by David McCallum.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: My Kind of Girl, written by Leslie Bricusse. Also nominated: Portrait of My Love, by Cyril Ornadel and Norman Newell
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1961 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Walkin’ Back To Happiness, written by Michael Hawker and John Schroeder. Also nominated: Are You Sure, by Bob Allison and John Allison
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: What Kind of Fool Am I?, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley. Also nominated: No Greater Love, by Michael Carr and Bunny Lewis
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral Composition: The Secrets of the Seine, written by Tony Osborne. Also nominated: Stranger on the Shore, by Acker Bilk
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: African Waltz, written by Galt Macdermot. Also nominated: Duddly Dell, by Dudley Moore
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Stage Play: Stop The World I Want to Get Off, written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: The Maigret Theme, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: The Avengers’ Theme, by Johnny Dankworth
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Cliff Richard and The Shadows

Ivor Novello Awards 1963

For the third year running, W.E. Butlin presented the eighth Ivor Novello ceremony, broadcast on BBC Television on 4th May 1963. The broadcast was introduced by Catherine Boyle and starred Acker Bilk, Matt Monro, The Tornados, Steve Race, Ron Grainer, Gordon Franks and Cliff Richard and The Shadows.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Stranger on the Shore, written by Acker Bilk. Also nominated: Wonderful Land, by Jerry Lordan
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1962 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Telstar, written by Joe Meek. Also nominated: Bachelor Boy, by Cliff Richard and Bruce Welch
  • The Most Outstanding Song of the Year, Musically and Lyrically: My Love and Devotion, written by Howard Barnes, Harold Fields and Joe Roncoroni. Also nominated: Jeannie, by Norman Newell and Russ Conway
  • The Year’s Outstanding Light Orchestral or Other Non-Vocal Composition: Nicola, written by Steve Race. Also nominated: Turkish Coffee, by Tony Osborne
  • The Year’s Outstanding Original Jazz Composition: Outbreak of Murder, written by Gordon Franks. Also nominated: Revival, by Joe Harriott
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical: Summer Holiday, performed by Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Also nominated: Blitz, written by Lionel Bart
  • The Year’s Outstanding Composition in a Film, Radio Production or Television Programme: Steptoe and Son, written by Ron Grainer. Also nominated: March from A Little Suite, by Trevor Duncan
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Popular and Light Music: Lawrence Wright

Ivor Novello Awards 1964

As we now know, 1963 was the year when popular music changed for good, with The Beatles rising to fame. For the 1964 award ceremony, they evolved quickly, ditching most of the jazz instrumentals and switching to a heavy focus on the Fab Four.

  • The Most Broadcast Work of the Year: She Loves You, performed by The Beatles and written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Dance One, by Elaine Murtagh, Valerie Murtagh and Ray Adams
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1963 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: She Loves You, by The Beatles. Also nominated: I Want To Hold Your Hand, same artist
  • The Year’s Outstanding Song: If I Ruled The World, written by Leslie Bricusse and Cyril Ornadel. Also nominated: All My Loving, by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Carlos’ Theme, written by Ivor Slaney. Also nominated: Scarlett O’Hara, by Jerry Lordan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Jazz Work: What the Dickens, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Sweet September, by Bill McGuffie
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Musical Show, For Stage, Cinema, Television or Radio: Theme from The Avengers, written by Johnny Dankworth. Also nominated: Half a Sixpence, by David Heneker
  • The Year’s Most Amusing or Novel Composition: Flash, Bang, Wallop, written by David Heneker. Also nominated: Harvest of Love, by Benny Hill and Tony Hatch
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: The Beatles and some additional hangers-on (Brian Epstein, George Harrison, John Lennon, George Martin, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr)
  • Special Award in Recognition of Fifty Years’ Service to the Music Industry: Performing Rights Society

Ivor Novello Awards 1965

The tenth ceremony, somewhat hilariously sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin (yes, him), took place on 13th July 1965 at the Savoy Hotel.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Can’t Buy Me Love, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1964 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Can’t Buy Me Love. Also nominated: I Feel Fine, same artist
  • Outstanding Song of 1964: Downtown, written by Tony Hatch. Also nominated: Losing You, by Tom Springfield and Clive Westlake
  • The Year’s Outstanding Orchestral / Instrumental Composition: Bombay Duckling, written by Max Harris
  • The Year’s Outstanding Theme from Radio, TV or Film: Not So Much A Programme, More A Way Of Life, written by Caryl Brahms, Ron Grainer and Ned Sherrin. Also nominated: Hard Day’s Night
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Robert and Elizabeth, written by Ron Grainer and Ronald Millar. Also nominated: Maggie May, written by Lionel Bart
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Paddy Roberts

Ivor Novello Awards 1966

The 1966 ceremony, also sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, took place at the Hammersmith Palais, London, and was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra. It was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 12th July 1966.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: I’ll Never Find Another You, written by Tom Springfield. Also nominated: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1965 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: We Can Work It Out, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Help
  • Outstanding Song of 1965: Yesterday, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Where Are You Now My Love, written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent
  • The Year’s Outstanding Beat Song: It’s Not Unusual, performed by Tom Jones, written by Gordon Mills and Les Reed. Also nominated: Look Through Any Window, by Graham Gouldman and Charles Silverman
  • The Year’s Outstanding Novelty Composition: A Windmill In Old Amsterdam, written by Ted Dicks and Myles Rudge. Also nominated: Mrs Brown, You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter, written by Trevor Peacock
  • The Year’s Outstanding Score of a Stage Musical: Charlie Girl, written by David Heneker and John Taylor
  • The Year’s Outstanding Contemporary Folk Song: Catch the Wind, by Donovan
  • The Year’s Outstanding Instrumental Composition: March of the Mods, written by Tony Carr. Also nominated: The Kiss, by Jack Parnell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: BBC TV, for the production of the series A Song For Europe

Ivor Novello Awards 1967

Still sponsored by Sir Billy Butlin, the twelfth ceremony took place at the Lyceum Ballroom, London, was introduced by Brian Matthew with Joe Loss and His Orchestra, and was broadcast on the BBC Light Programme on 27th March 1967.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Michelle, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: Yesterday
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1966 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Yellow Submarine, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Also nominated: What Would I Be, written by Jackie Trent
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Winchester Cathedral, written by Geoff Stephens. Also nominated: Call Me, written by Tony Hatch
  • Film Song of the Year: Born Free, written by John Barry and Don Black. Also nominated: Time Drags By, performed by The Shadows, written by Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch, Brian Bennett and John Rostill
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy?, written by Allan Smethurst. Also nominated: Dedicated Follower of Fashion, written by Ray Davies
  • Instrumental Composition of the Year: The Power Game, written by Wayne Hill. Also nominated: Khartoum, written by Frank Cordell
  • Special Award for Outstanding Services to British Music: Joe Loss

Ivor Novello Awards 1968

For some reason, from 1968 onwards, history no longer seems to record the nominated but losing entries.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Puppet on a String, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1967 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: The Last Waltz, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: A Whiter Shade of Pale, performed by Procul Harum, written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid
  • Best British Song, Musically and Lyrically: She’s Leaving Home, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Novelty Song of the Year: Grocer Jack, written by Keith West and Mark Wirtz
  • Best Instrumental Theme: Love in the Open Air, written by Paul McCartney
  • Special Award: Leslie Bricusse, for The Film Score Doctor Dolittle
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Alan Herbert

Ivor Novello Awards 1969

The fourteenth Ivor Novello Awards were sponsored by the BBC, and took place on 22nd May 1969.

  • The Most Performed Work of the Year: Congratulations, performed by Cliff Richard, written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin
  • The ‘A’ Side of the Record Issued in 1968 Which Achieved the Highest Certified British Sales: Hey Jude, performed by The Beatles, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • Britain’s International Song of the Year: Delilah, written by Barry Mason and Les Reed
  • The Most Romantic Song of the Year: I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten, written by Clive Westlake
  • Outstanding Dance / Beat Song of the Year: Build Me Up Buttercup, written by Michael D’Abo and Tony Macaulay
  • Novelty Song of the Year: I’m The Urban Spaceman, written by Neil Innes
  • Light Music Composition of the Year: Ring of Kerry, written by Peter Hope
  • Outstanding Services to British Music: Andrew Gold (presented posthumously)

Further Reading