Kraftwerk Remixed

When you consider the huge part that Kraftwerk played in the development of electronic music, it is perhaps surprising how few remixes they have to their name – just N of their tracks have been remixed by others. In a way, there’s something rather beautiful about the preservation of their artistic vision in this way, but it’s also something of a shame that we can’t hear a few more reinterpretations, especially given how good the ones we did get are.

So here’s the full list:

YearTrackRemixerVersion(s)
1983Tour de FranceFrançois KevorkianKevorkian Remix (German)
Kevorkian Remix (English)
Kevorkian Remix (various edit versions)
1986Musique Non StopFrançois Kevorkian12″ Version
1986Der Telefon Anruf / The Telephone CallFrançois Kevorkian & Ron St. GermainRemix (German)
Remix (English)
1991Radioactivität / RadioactivityFrançois KevorkianFrançois Kevorkian 7″ Remix (German)
François Kevorkian 7″ Remix (English)
François Kevorkian 12″ Remix (English)
1991Radioactivität / RadioactivityWilliam OrbitWilliam Orbit 7″ Remix (German)
William Orbit 12″ Remix (German)
William Orbit 7″ Remix (English)
William Orbit 12″ Remix (English)
William Orbit Hardcore Mix (English)
2000Expo 2000OrbitalOrbital Mix
2000Expo 2000François Kevorkian & Rob RivesFrançois K + Rob Rives Mix
2000Expo 2000DJ RolandoDJ Rolando Mix
2000Expo 2000Underground ResistanceUnderground Resistance Mix
UR Infiltrated Mix
UR Thought 3 Mix
2004AerodynamikAlex Gopher & Étienne De CrécyAlex Gopher / Étienne De Crécy Dynamik Mix
2004AerodynamikFrançois KevorkianFrançois K Aero Mix
François K Aero Mix Instrumental
2007AerodynamikHot ChipIntelligent Design Mix
2007La FormeHot ChipKing of the Mountains Mix

There you have it – just eighteen remixes plus a handful of variations, of seven tracks, by eleven other artists. Some of the early ones don’t even stray far from the originals. But they’re pretty much uniformly fantastic, and do form a key part of Kraftwerk‘s wonderful discography – so I hope that one day we can see them all collected together. The Remix, anyone?

Kraftwerk – Aerodynamik

Kraftwerk singles are a rare enough treat, but it’s only in recent years (and by that, I mean perhaps the last two decades or so) that I think you would be able to safely regard them as a full single package. With Aerodynamik, I think you could argue that they reached their pinnacle.

Fans had been somewhat divided over album Tour de France Soundtracks (2003), but this single, now with a slightly tweaked title (on the album it’s Aéro Dynamik) and released fifteen years ago this week, was better received – although you would be pushed to notice this from its chart performance, as it peaked at just number 33 in the UK – although that far eclipsed its German performance, where it hit just number 80.

Key to the single is the new Kling Klang Dynamix version, Kraftwerk‘s own seven-minute remix with heavily reworked drums and percussive sounds. You would, of course, have to appreciate the original, but I suspect most people did, as it’s clearly one of the standout tracks on Tour de France Soundtracks. Having established that, even just an extended version would be great – but this is more than just expansive – it’s a comprehensive rework of the original, while still entirely in the same spirit – it’s absolutely brilliant. Before that, though, we had already had a taster with the Kling Klang Radio Mix, a four-minute edit of the Dynamix, which is exceptional too.

Another nice thing that happened with Kraftwerk was their embracing of remix culture from the early 1980s onwards – it almost feels out of character for them, given how purist they have become about their own music, but a small group of artists have been let loose on their catalogue, and they have created, pretty much without exception, wonderful versions. Hopefully one day, the Düsseldorf quartet will formalise these versions in a remix album – I’ll be at the front of the queue.

To prove my point, the brilliant Alex Gopher and Étienne de Crécy turn up for the third version on this single, the Dynamik Mix, adding some wonderful eccentricities – the drums are a bit more metallic, and are augmented by some nice woodblock usage, but the key to the mix is the enormous acid synth arpeggio that runs all the way through. At the risk of repeating myself, this is exceptional too. For Kraftwerk to have returned the preceding year after twelve years of silence with material this good is very impressive.

Closing the release sees longtime Kraftwerk remixer François Kevorkian turn up for his Aero Mix, a broader and more expansive take on the track. Like all of François’s Kraftwerk remixes, it’s a subtle reworking, almost a dub mix or a “part two” version at times, with relatively few new sounds, but it’s always good to have his take on a track. If I had to choose, I’d say that of these remixes I probably like this one the least, but there’s really nothing in it – his is a typically subtle reworking of some great material.

So if you buy any Kraftwerk singles, I can provide a list of which you should track down, but this one should be high on the list. It would be a full three years before the next single, which ironically saw Aerodynamik coming out again, this time as a double a-side with La Forme, remixed by Hot Chip, and in a bright green neon sleeve.

The CD version of Aerodynamik is hard to find now, but the digital release is widely available.

Artist of the Week – Air

Time now for another artist of the week, plucked straight out of the archives. As always, apologies in advance if any of this is plagiarised, or if it contains any inaccuracies.

Air are Jean-Benoît Dunckel and Nicolas Godin, from Versailles. Together with Étienne de Crécy and Alex Gopher, who would both go on to carve out musical careers for themselves, they started making music in the early 1990s. The first Air single Modular Mix was released late in 1995, and within very little time they were a huge underground act in France, and were carving a name out for themselves in the UK as well. The British release of Modular Mix peaked at number 177 in 1996.

Their first proper studio album Moon Safari was released in 1998, and, with the help of hits such as Sexy Boy and Kelly Watch the Stars, catapulted them into the top end of the UK charts.

After spending the following year touring, they returned at the start of 2000 with the soundtrack to Sofia Coppola‘s The Virgin Suicides, which gave them their third hit album and their fourth UK top 75 single with the beautiful Playground Love.

The second studio album 10,000 Hz Legend was released in 2001, and sadly has come to be seen as a bit of a mistake. It ditched the pure electronic sounds and turned instead to more traditional rock sounds, featuring various guest artists including Beck. However, it was still a substantial hit in the UK, and its remix companion Everybody Hertz also scraped onto the charts.

Last year saw the release of possibly their most bizarre project to date, an audio book entitled City Reading, and featuring their music, accompanying Alessandro Baricco‘s surreal stories. A very entertaining idea, but of course, not that easy to listen to!

Their most recent album Talkie Walkie was released in January this year, and the only single to be released so far in the UK is Alpha Beta Gaga, from the Orange adverts, which was a minor hit. The album is absolutely stunning, though, and features several fantastic tracks. As well as potentially huge singles such as Cherry Blossom Girl and Another Day, there’s another soundtrack piece from Sofia Coppola‘s latest film Lost in Translation, and many more great tracks.